Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies

The MEMS Master Class Series

These occasional sessions invite visiting experts - from both outside and inside the University of Kent - to offer students additional research skills. Recent Master Classes have included:

The Foundation of Lambeth Palace Library - Professor James Carley (Kent)

‘a precious treasure’: the foundation of Lambeth Palace Library (18 March, 20015)

Using examples from the libraries of Archbishops John Whitgift (d. 1604) and Richard Bancroft (d. 1610) we shall look at the component parts that make up the early library at Lambeth Palace.  In several of these cases—in particular Henry VIII and Thomas Wakefield—we shall note parallels with books later brought by Sancroft to Canterbury.  This will be followed by a discussion of the catalogues put together by the early archbishops and the subsequent history of the library up to the Restoration.

Recommended readings: James P. Carley, ‘“Accurately and Exquisitely Made”: George Abbots Preface to the 1612 Catalogue of Lambeth Palace Library’, in From the Reformation to the Permissive Society: A Miscellany in Celebration of the 400th Anniversary of Lambeth Palace Library, ed. Melanie Barber, et al. (Woodbridge, 2010), pp. 43–62; Lambeth Palace Library: Treasures from the Collections of the Archbishops of Canterbury, ed. Richard Palmer et al. (London, 2010).

James Carley is Professor of the History of the Book at the University of Kent. He has taught at Oberlin College, the University of Rochester and York University, Toronto. He is an Associate Fellow at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto, and an Honorary Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford.

He has published extensively on Glastonbury Abbey and its chronicles and is the author of two monographs on Henry VIII's library and its sources. He is working on the second volume of his edition, translation and study of the De uiris illustribus of the Tudor antiquary and book collector John Leland. Growing out of his Sandars Lectures in Bibliography at the University of Cambridge is a three volume project on Archbishops Whitgift, Bancroft and the foundation of Lambeth Palace Library.

Canterbury Cathedral Library: history and component parts - Professor James Carley and Dr David Shaw (Kent)

‘a rich storehouse of ancient manuscripts’.  Canterbury Cathedral Library: history and component parts (11 March, 2015)

This session will begin with an examination of a printed book deriving from the library of King Henry VIII that is now stored at Canterbury Cathedral Library.  We shall then discuss the medieval libraries at Christ Church Priory and St Augustine’s and look at a few survivors now found in the Cathedral Library.  David Shaw will describe some of the early post-dissolution collectors, giving examples and Shaw and Carley will then together discuss the books, including the Henry VIII survivor, that were sent to Canterbury from Lambeth Palace by Archbishop William Sancroft towards the end of the 17th century.  Our last example will be a book that derived from Thomas Wakefield, first regius professor Hebrew at Cambridge.  We shall look closely at Wakefield’s marginalia and see why the integrity of collections is important, the whole being greater than the sum of the parts.

Recommended reading: Nigel Ramsay, ‘The Cathedral Archives and Library’, in A History of Canterbury Cathedral, ed. Patrick Collinson, Nigel Ramsay and Margaret Sparks (Oxford, 1995), pp. 341–407.

 

James Carley is Professor of the History of the Book at the University of Kent. He has taught at Oberlin College, the University of Rochester and York University, Toronto. He is an Associate Fellow at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto, and an Honorary Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. He has published extensively on Glastonbury Abbey and its chronicles and is the author of two monographs on Henry VIII's library and its sources. He is working on the second volume of his edition, translation and study of the De uiris illustribus of the Tudor antiquary and book collector John Leland. Growing out of his Sandars Lectures in Bibliography at the University of Cambridge is a three volume project on Archbishops Whitgift, Bancroft and the foundation of Lambeth Palace Library.

Dr David Shaw is Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Kent. His research interests include the history of the book in early modern Europe, French Renaissance studies, and rare-books librarianship.

 

The Development of a National Library under King Henry VIII - Professors James Carley and David Starkey (Kent)

The moste magnificent libraries of yowr royal palacis’:  the development of a national library under King Henry VIII (4 March, 2015)

This master class willl begin with a background survey of the royal library inherited by Henry VIII and this will be followed by a descripton of its re-formation during the tumultuous 1530s.  Next will come a description of the marks in the books themselves that allow us to identify items that survive in the British Library and elsewhere.  Following this we shall look briefly at marginalia entered in the books by Henry VIII and others.  During the second half of the seminar David Starkey will discuss how we interpret the data.

Recommended reading: James P. Carley, The Books of King Henry VIII and his Wives (London, 2004); Henry VIII: Man and Monarch, ed. Sue Doran, Andrea Clarke and David Starkey (London, 2009); Royal Manuscripts: the Genius of Illumination, ed. Scot McKendrick et al. (London, 2011).

 

James Carley is Professor of the History of the Book at the University of Kent. He has taught at Oberlin College, the University of Rochester and York University, Toronto. He is an Associate Fellow at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto, and an Honorary Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. He has published extensively on Glastonbury Abbey and its chronicles and is the author of two monographs on Henry VIII's library and its sources. He is working on the second volume of his edition, translation and study of the De uiris illustribus of the Tudor antiquary and book collector John Leland. Growing out of his Sandars Lectures in Bibliography at the University of Cambridge is a three volume project on Archbishops Whitgift, Bancroft and the foundation of Lambeth Palace Library.

David Starkey is an Honorary Visiting Professor of History at the University of Kent. He is a British constitutional historian and a radio and television presenter.

Researching the Undocumented Past - Professor Chris Dyer (Leicester)

30 January, 2015

In this session, Professor Chris Dyer examined how things which are not conventionally recorded can, non the less, be detected from hints and silences.

Professor Chris Dyer is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Leicester his research interests include The economic and social history of medieval England, which includes the management of landed estates, agrarian history, peasant mentality and rebellion, standards of living (including diet and housing), consumers and consumption, relations between town and country, the role of towns, especially of smaller towns, the conditions and attitudes of wage earners, poverty, the origins of capitalism, landscape history, rural depopulation, and money and commerce. Much of this research has been focussed on the west midland region (Gloucestershire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire) but has also included the east midlands, East Anglia and Yorkshire.

 

Editing from Manuscript Materials - Professor Tony Edwards (Kent)

March, 2012

Professor Edwards challenged participants to think critically about the choices that that editors make in rendering a manuscript text into print, and demonstrated the need for editors to articulate their methods clearly by inviting students to critique edited texts alongside their manuscript sources.

Tony Edwards is Professor of Medieval Manuscripts at the University of Kent. His research interests are Middle English, early modern, bibliography, textual criticism and the history of the book.

Developing Bibliographic Skills - Professor Ralph Hana (Oxford)

 

Textual Relations and Stemmata - Professor Michael G. Sargent (CU New York)

 

Working With Material Sources - Dr Glen Adamson (The V&A)

 

Codicological Methodologies - Professor Erik Kwakkel (Leiden)

 

The Provenance of Medieval and Early Modern Books - Prof Jan Cermak (CU Prague)

 

 

 

 

Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Rutherford College, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NX

Telephone +44 1227 823140. Fax +44 1227 827060

Last Updated: 11/03/2015