Portrait of Dr Omar Al-Tabbaa

Dr Omar Al-Tabbaa

Senior Lecturer in Strategy & International Business

About

Dr Omar Al-Tabbaa is a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in Strategy and International Business, and he leads the MSc International Business & Management programme at Kent Business School.
He received his MSc (with Distinction) and PhD degrees from the University of Leeds, where he became a fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Previously he was a visiting researcher at Leeds University Business School. 

Recognising his work and commitment, Dr. AL-Tabbaa has received several awards including the ‘Outstanding Academic Performance Award’ at PhD level (University of Leeds), Best Paper Award (British Academy of Management), Highly Commended Paper prize (Emerald Literati Network), and was nominated three times for the ‘Thank You Award’, for teaching excellence, (University of Huddersfield). 

In addition to academia, Dr Al-Tabbaa has extensive experience in the business development sector as he established and led the first Business and Technology Incubator in Palestine; a project funded by the World Bank. 

Research interests

Overall, Dr Al-Tabbaa’s research focuses on two broad themes: the nature and process of inter-organisational relationship, and sustainable business model innovation. Under the first theme, he investigates the collaborating mechanism between organisations in different settings including strategic alliance and internationalisation of SMEs, cross-sector collaboration, co-innovation, and technology transfer. In the second theme, Dr Al-Tabbaa studies how organisations develop their business models to create value in developing economies, and how they can engage in the emerging phenomenon of sharing economy.
His research, teaching, and enterprise activities have been supported by grants from both industries and research institutions totalling more than £1,000,000.  

Selected research and enterprise Grants 

2015-2018

  • Erasmus+ Capacity Building in Higher Education (561966-EPP-1-2015-1-PS-EPPKA2-CBHE-JP)
  • €832,191.0 
  • Co-principle investigator 
  • The grant aims to develop business and economic research centres (including curriculum development) at Palestinian Higher Education Institutions. The project involves collaboration with four Palestinian institutions and three European universities.

2015-2016

  • European Subsea Cables Association (ESCA)
  • £25,000 
  • Co-principle investigator
  • The project aimed to develop a comprehensive socio-economic impact evaluation framework for UK subsea cable industry.

2009-2013

  • University of Leeds
  • £50,000
  • Leeds University Business School doctoral research fellowship

2007-2008

  • World Bank - InfoDe program
  • $25,700
  • Grant Lead
  • The project aimed to develop a regional supporting network for business incubators by designing an innovative training model for building the capacity of the Middle East and North Africa incubators network members. 

 2006-2007

  • World Bank-InfoDev program
  • $125,000
  • Grant Lead
  • The project aims at enhancing the socio-economic situation in the Gaza Strip by using innovation to create new start-up ICT businesses. In specific, the project aimed to establish the first business incubator in the Palestinian territories.

Teaching

Dr Al-Tabbaa’s teaching interests lie in the areas of strategic management, innovation process and enablers and research methodology. He has taught International Business and Strategy modules at both undergraduate and graduate levels in different universities including Leeds, Huddersfield, and Kent.

Supervision

Current Supervisees

  • Simdul Miri-Dashe: Business model innovation through scalability in the renewable energy sector in Africa 
  • Maksym Koghut: Exploring the Role of Blockchain Technology in Inter-organisational Trust Formation 
  • Sara Odat: The effect of the sharing economy at innovating SMEs business model in developing economies 
  • Matt Snell: Solar energy social enterprises operating in the nexus between formal and informal economies (the University of Huddersfield, External supervisor)
  • Yeneingeda Kassahun: University-Industry Interaction between developing and developed economies (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, External supervisor) 

Past Supervisees

  • Nadia Zahoor: Alliance capability, internationalization, and co-innovation in SMEs 
  • Abdalhamed Nasr: Alliance capability in family businesses 

Professional

  • External Examiner, University of Essex
  • Fellow of the Higher Education Academy
  • Academic Consultant, Said Foundation, UK
  • Visiting Research Fellow University of Leeds, (2014-2018)
  • Academic Consultant, Chevening Scholarships Secretariat, (2013-2014)  



Publications

Article

  • Zahoor, N., Al-Tabbaa, O., Khan, Z. and Wood, G. (2020). Collaboration and Internationalization of SMEs: Insights and Recommendations from a Systematic Review. International Journal of Management Reviews [Online]. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijmr.12238.
    This article performs a systematic literature review of the undeniably diverse – and somewhat fragmented – current state of research on the collaborations and internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). We analyze key works and synthesize them into a framework that conceptually maps key antecedents, mediators, and moderators that influence the internationalization of SMEs. In addition, we highlight limitations of the literature, most notably in terms of theoretical fragmentation; extant theories are deployed and illustrated but rarely extended in a manner that significantly informs subsequent work. At an applied (but related) level, we argue the need for supplementary work that explores the distinct stages of internationalization – and the scope and scale of this process – rather than assuming closure around particular events. With this, we highlight the need for more rigorous and empirically informed explorations of contextual effects that take account of the consequences of developments in the global economic ecosystem.
  • Zahoor, N. and Al-Tabbaa, O. (2020). Inter-organizational collaboration and SMEs’ innovation: A systematic review and future research directions. Scandinavian Journal of Management [Online] 36. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scaman.2020.101109.
    Inter-organizational collaboration (IOC) has gained increased attention in research and practice given its documented influence on the innovation of small and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs). Regardless of the growing number of studies, there is still lack of research that scrutinizes and synthesizes this body of knowledge. This paper undertakes a systematic review of 113 studies from 2000 to 2019 to analyse research trends and findings on the nature and dynamics of IOC-innovation relationship in SMEs domain. Based on this analysis, we develop a framework grounded in selected theoretical lenses and empirical findings to advance our understanding of key antecedents, mediators, moderators and outcomes. We highlight that extant theories are deployed and illustrated but rarely extended in a manner that significantly informs subsequent work. Furthermore, we identify that innovation is a complex process that involves different mechanisms. On that basis, we have identified several research gaps and provided a future research agenda that we mapped into four dimensions: theory, phenomenon, methodology and context.
  • Saadatyar, F., Al-Tabbaa, O., Dagnino, G. and Vazife, Z. (2020). Industrial clusters in the developing economies: insights from the Iranian carpet industry. Strategic Change [Online] 29:227-239. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1002/jsc.2324.
    Industrial clusters are perceived as potential drivers of SMEs development and efficient policy instruments to lead national and regional innovation and growth. However, these clusters in developing economies are typically placed in complex environments that impose a mix of serious challenges which adversely affect their overall performance. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the nature of these challenges and understand their dynamics using a case study of a carpet industry cluster in Iran. Using multiple sources of evidence, the study reveals two distinct, yet interrelated, levels of challenges: micro and macro. Under each level, a number of key dimensions were identified and theoretically linked which helped to conceptualize the structure of these challenges and model their dynamics.
  • De Silva, M., Al-Tabbaa, O. and Khan, Z. (2020). Business Model Innovation by International Social Purpose Organizations: the Role of Dynamic Capabilities. Journal of Business Research [Online]. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.12.030.
    This paper examines the role played by dynamic capabilities and business model innovation in international social purpose organizations (ISPOs)1 operating across developing and developed countries. Utilizing a qualitative multiple case study methodology, we identify a set of dynamic capabilities deployed and leveraged by these organizations for business model innovation in order to achieve their dual mission of social and economic value creation. The findings highlight unique micro-foundational capabilities of the founders that are vitally important to perceive social challenges as opportunities for ISPOs to sense socially and economically intertwined prospects. We discuss the specific organizational-level capabilities—at both the production and selling sites—that are developed and utilized by ISPOs to seize opportunities by combining competing social and economic logics. In relation to transformation, ISPOs develop ecosystem-wide production- and market-related capabilities—in both developing and developed countries—that enable them to scale-up their dual mission business model through co-creation.
  • Workplace spirituality as a source for competitive advantage: an empirical study (2019). International Journal of Organizational Analysis [Online]. Available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJOA-10-2019-1915.
    Purpose: This paper aims to theorize and empirically examines the role of perceived spirituality in developing organization competitiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts a quantitative approach, where the structural equation modeling approached was applied to analyze a unique dataset collected from 550 health-care staff in two international hospitals in Iran.

    Findings: The results show that although the workplace spirituality (WS) can indirectly enhance the development of competitive advantages by affecting the level of organizational commitment; however, the direct relationship of WS and competitive advantage has a higher path coefficient than its indirect one. Also, interestingly, it is found that, although WS affects the three dimensions of organizational commitment (affective, continuance and normative commitment), but only WS by mediating role of affective commitment can affect the competitive advantage at understudied hospitals.

    Originality/value: This study makes important theoretical contributions by conceptualizing and validating the effect of WS on the development of organization competitive advantage. As such, the authors explicate the commitment-related paths through which WS can affect organization overall performance.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Leach, D. and Khan, Z. (2019). Examining Alliance Management Capabilities in Cross-sector Collaborative Partnerships. Journal of Business Research [Online] 101:268-284. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.04.001.
    While there is a significant amount of research on cross-sector collaboration, we still lack an adequate
    understanding of the nature and dynamics of Alliance Management Capabilities (AMC) that
    organizations demand when stretching their inter-organizational relationships beyond the boundaries of
    their sector. We address this gap by investigating the role of AMC in establishing and maintaining cross-sector
    collaborations, focusing on the perspective of nonprofit organizations (NPOs). Using qualitative
    data obtained from a diverse group of NPOs that are actively in collaboration with the business sector,
    we identified a unique set of AMC that are deployed at the pre- and post-formation stages of
    collaboration, and concomitantly at both stages (or cross-cutting AMC). Moreover, we provide an
    integrative framework that explains how these capabilities are leveraged and developed within the
    context of cross-sector collaboration which takes a circular path that comprises strategic actions and
    learning routines. We draw implications for theory and practice.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Leach, D. and Khan, Z. (2019). Examining alliance management capabilities in cross-sector collaborative partnerships. Journal of Business Research [Online] 101:268-284. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.04.001.
    While there is a significant amount of research on cross-sector collaboration, we still lack an adequate understanding of the nature and dynamics of Alliance Management Capabilities (AMC) that organizations demand when stretching their inter-organizational relationships beyond the boundaries of their sector. We address this gap by investigating the role of AMC in establishing and maintaining cross-sector collaborations, focusing on the perspective of nonprofit organizations (NPOs). Using qualitative data obtained from a diverse group of NPOs that are actively
    in collaboration with the business sector, we identified a unique set of AMC that are deployed at the pre- and post-formation stages of collaboration, and concomitantly at both stages (or cross-cutting AMC). Moreover, we provide an integrative framework that explains how these capabilities are leveraged and developed within the context of cross-sector collaboration which takes a circular path that comprises strategic actions and learning routines. We draw implications for theory and practice.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Ankrah, S. and Zahoor, N. (2019). Systematic literature review in management and business studies: a case study on university-industry collaboration. SAGE Research Methods Cases Business & Management [Online]. Available at: https://methods.sagepub.com/case/systematic-literature-review-in-business-studies-university-industry-collab?fromsearch=true.
    Although it first appeared in the medical sciences, the systematic literature review has become an established methodology in reviewing the accumulated knowledge in different fields. It is useful for scrutinizing and synthesizing a large volume of research on a specific topic or phenomenon, seeking to generate new insights from integrating empirical evidence, identifying knowledge gaps and inconsistencies, and setting directions for future research. Accordingly, in this case study, we aim to illustrate the steps for developing a rigorous systematic review in business and management research. Specifically, we reflect on our experience in systematically reviewing the research produced on University-Industry Collaboration phenomenon. We show examples of the different steps, stages, and activities of this approach, and discuss the various decisions we made throughout our research journey. Moreover, we provide learned lessons, highlight caveats, and offer suggestions and guidance for enhancing the rigor of future systematic literature review research.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O. (2019). Cross-Sector Partnership Research from a Civil Society Perspective: Two Current Trends. Annual Review of Social Partnerships [Online] 2018:24-26. Available at: https://www.crcpress.com/rsc/downloads/ARSP_13.pdf?fbclid=IwAR2_xmPJoQhM0bha8H0-anQ15XxCt3WIr1Va7jDq59Y-AFB9SHkMr5-hLxQ.
    It is conspicuous that research on cross-sector collaboration is increasingly dedicating attention to assessing the perspective of civil society. Examining this body of literature has indicated two salient research trends: the effect of cross-sector partnership on civil society organizations performance and the impact of civil society organisations on the effectiveness of cross-sector partnerships.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O. and Ankrah, S. (2018). ‘Engineered’ University-Industry Collaboration: A social capital perspective. European Management Review [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/emre.12174.
    While there is an extensive body of knowledge on University-Industry Collaboration (UIC) for technology transfer, two salient gaps remain. First, studies on UIC have predominately focused on situations when the relationship is established based on perceived complementary needs between collaborators. However, research on ‘engineered’ UIC, or when the collaboration has been triggered and coordinated by a third party, is still scarce. Second, we lack proper understanding into the micro foundation of technology transfer process using the lens of social capital (SC). This is a necessary inquiry given the prevailing conception of technology transfer as a sociotechnical process. We address these two gaps by investigating the idiosyncrasy of SC in five case studies of the Faraday Partnership Initiative, a UK public-sponsored program designed to enhance cross-sector technology transfer. As key contributions, we develop a conceptual framework that explains how social capital facilitates technology transfer in engineered UIC. We also advance the debate on academic engagement and commercialization by elaborating how knowledge produced by academics can be transformed into useable forms of technology by distinguishing between technology translation and transfer. The former emerged as a critical element of the latter.
  • Social capital to facilitate ‘engineered’ university–industry collaboration for technology transfer: A dynamic perspective (2016). Technological Forecasting & Social Change [Online] 104:1-15. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2015.11.027.
    Over the last decade, social capital concept has received considerable amount of research being regarded as an
    important value creation mechanism. However, we still have limited understanding about the nature of interaction
    between the dimensions of this capital, and how it can be useful in mitigating the impediments evolving
    during government-sponsored (i.e., engineered) university–industry collaboration (UIC). In this paper, we address
    the previous gap by analyzing the dynamics of social capital dimensions during the preformation and
    postformation stages of UIC. The paper relies on a unique context that comprises five embedded case studies
    of UIC for technology transfer: the Faraday Partnership Initiative, a UK government-backed novel scheme for enhancing
    innovation. The analysis shows that the impact and interaction of the dimensions were not static but
    rather varying over time. Further, we present a new value creation framework for social capital through mapping
    its power in reducing the intensity of difficulties emerged during the collaboration lifetime. We also identify two
    facilitating factors as critical in creating and maintaining social capital in engineered UIC. The present study thus
    contributes to a deeper understanding of the value of inter-organizational social capital.
  • Ankrah, S. and Al-Tabbaa, O. (2015). Universities–industry collaboration: A systematic review. Scandinavian Journal of Management [Online] 31:387-408. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scaman.2015.02.003.
    The collaboration between universities and the industry is increasingly perceived as a vehicle to enhance innovation through knowledge exchange. This is evident by a significant increase in studies that investigate the topic from different perspectives. However, this body of knowledge is still described as fragmented and lacks efficient comprehensive view. To address this gap, we employed a systematic procedure to review the literature on universities–industry collaboration (UIC). The review resulted in identifying five key aspects, which underpinned the theory of UIC. We integrate these key aspects into an overarching process framework, which together with the review, provide a substantial contribution by creating an integrated analysis of the state of literature concerning this phenomenon. Several research avenues are reported as distilled from the analysis.
  • An Investigation into Factors Influencing Students’ Attitude toward using Social Media as a Recruitment Tool (2014). International Journal of Management Academy [Online] 2:9-26. Available at: http://www.ijoma.org/?_action=articleInfo&article=10855.
    It is of no doubt that social media sites have become the most dominated subject in today life. However, the effect of those websites has widely disseminated not only into social life but into the business world as well. Recruitment is one of the topics that have influence by social networking sites. Previous studies have shown growing use of social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn as a recruitment tool. As a result studying individuals’ attitudes toward using those websites have grabbed significant attention into the scientific field. In fact, many factors have influence on individuals’ attitudes. This research is an investigation into factors influencing student’s attitude toward using social media as a recruitment tool. A total of 101 respondents were participated in this quantitative research. The collected data were analysed by using various methods like Reliable scale of Cronbach, Pearson correlation, Distributive Statistics, T-Test and Multiple regression. The findings indicate that the respondents were not using social media as a recruitment tool. However, the results also revealed that perceived social media usefulness and self-efficacy, and privacy concern were significantly correlated to the students’ attitude while Year of study has no influence on the dependent variable students’ attitude.
  • Huatuco Huaccho, L., Moxham, C. and Al-Tabbaa, O. (2014). Third Sector and performance. International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management [Online] 63. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1108/IJPPM-05-2014-0081.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Leach, D. and March, J. (2014). Collaboration Between Nonprofit and Business Sectors: A Framework to Guide Strategy Development for Nonprofit Organizations. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations [Online] 25:657-678. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-013-9357-6.
    Collaboration between nonprofit and business sectors is widely regarded as a value creation process that benefits society, business, and nonprofit organizations (NPOs). This process, however, has rarely been considered from a nonprofit perspective. In this paper, we discuss a new framework to assist NPOs in developing strategic collaborations with businesses. We argue that, by being strategically proactive rather than reactive to what businesses might offer, NPOs can increase the scale of their cross-sector collaborations and thus enhance their sustainability. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Gadd, K. and Ankrah, S. (2013). Excellence models in the non-profit context: strategies for continuous improvement. International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management [Online] 30:590-612. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1108/02656711311315521.
    Purpose – This paper provides insights into the applicability of excellence models (in particular the
    European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model), for use in the nonprofit
    context as a strategy for performance improvement aiming to enhance sustainability.
    Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on an exploratory, qualitative in-depth case
    study approach, which includes three UK-based nonprofit organizations (NPOs) as research case
    studies.
    Findings – In general, we found the quality models to be relevant to the NPO context, and potentially
    effective and useful as a performance improvement strategy for NPOs. However, we also propose some
    modifications to the EFQM model to address the specific characteristics of this sector. Additionally, we
    compare two of the most widely used quality models (EFQM and MBNQA), and suggest that although
    both are relevant for NPOs, the EFQM model has some superior advantages.
    Originality/value – This paper contributes to the debate about the sustainability of organizations
    and the underpinning mechanisms behind their efficiency. Many researchers and practitioners are
    continually debating how an organization can optimize its available resources, as this is considered to be
    one of the primary foundations for organization sustainability. The added contribution of this paper
    advances this debate a step further by providing insights into how concepts and tools which have been
    initially designed for the for-profit sector can be deployed by nonprofit organizations (NPOs).
    In addition, the paper provides further views about the approaches NPOs might use in response to the
    current political and financial challenges.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Gadd, K. and Ankrah, S. (2013). Excellence models in the non-profit context: Strategies for continuous improvement. International Journal of Quality and Reliability Management [Online] 30:590-612. Available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02656711311315521.
    Purpose: This paper provides insights into the applicability of excellence models (in particular the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model), for use in the nonprofit context as a strategy for performance improvement aiming to enhance sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on an exploratory, qualitative in-depth case study approach, which includes three UK-based nonprofit organizations (NPOs) as research case studies. Findings: In general, we found the quality models to be relevant to the NPO context, and potentially effective and useful as a performance improvement strategy for NPOs. However, we also propose some modifications to the EFQM model to address the specific characteristics of this sector. Additionally, we compare two of the most widely used quality models (EFQM and MBNQA), and suggest that although both are relevant for NPOs, the EFQM model has some superior advantages. Originality/value: This paper contributes to the debate about the sustainability of organizations and the underpinning mechanisms behind their efficiency. Many researchers and practitioners are continually debating how an organization can optimize its available resources, as this is considered to be one of the primary foundations for organization sustainability. The added contribution of this paper advances this debate a step further by providing insights into how concepts and tools which have been initially designed for the for-profit sector can be deployed by nonprofit organizations (NPOs). In addition, the paper provides further views about the approaches NPOs might use in response to the current political and financial challenges. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O. and Rustom, R. (2011). General framework for designing multi-use simulation modules for estimating project durations. Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management [Online] 11:321-337. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1108/14714171111149034.
    Purpose: This paper seeks to propose a general framework to be used in developing multi?use simulation modules for estimating project durations at the planning phase.
    Design/methodology/approach: The research method incorporates two main stages. First, conceptualisation of the general framework, and second, implementing the framework in modelling and experimenting simulation modules, which involves data collection, statistical analysis, templates building through the ARENA software, and modules verification and validation.
    Findings: The framework was found to be effective in providing an approach for building multi?use simulation modules. The validation and verification processes of the developed simulation module reflect the soundness of the proposed framework.
    Practical implications: Useful insights have been presented in this research regarding building multi?use simulation modules in infrastructure construction projects. In addition, the paper demonstrates examples about how simulation interaction interface can contribute to the efficiency of using the simulation technique.
    Originality/value: Given the lack of general approaches for building multi?use simulation modules, this research suggests a simplified approach for developing multi?use modules. Both academics and practitioners can benefit from this new approach by understanding the mechanism behind the multi?use model concept as explained in this paper.

Book section

  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Leach, D. and March, J. (2015). Nonprofit-business collaboration: operationalising a strategy for nonprofit organizations. In: Public Service Operations Management: A Research Handbook. Routledge, p. 30. Available at: https://www.routledge.com/Public-Service-Operations-Management-A-research-handbook/Radnor-Bateman-Esain-Kumar-Williams-Upton/p/book/9781138813694.

Conference or workshop item

  • Pitsis, P., Schweitzer, J., Mount, M. and Al-Tabbaa, O. (2018). Positive Design: Using Design Thinking as a Creative Process for Enhancing Project Outcomes. In: Academy of Management Meeting.
    This PDW brings together scholars and practitioners working on creativity, design thinking
    and strategy to explore, debate, and illustrate the ways in which design thinking is being used
    as a creative process to positively impact people as the beneficiaries and stakeholders of
    projects. The PDW is the first of a series of PDWs to be proposed at AOM over the next
    three years seeking to bring the design thinking and positive organizational scholarship
    communities together to advance knowledge, theorizing and research on how design thinking
    can impact projects to improve society and have a positive and sustainable impact on people,
    planet and profit. The workshop will be an interactive, design thinking led session and will
    produce micro-projects to advance the ‘positive design’ cause within the academy. This
    session will also be supported by the Project Management Institute (PMI) and will seek to
    broaden and build networks across AOM, SMS and PMI to advance creative approaches to
    project design with a focus on beneficiaries and stakeholders.
  • Zahoor, N. and Al-Tabbaa, O. (2017). Linking inter-organizational collaboration, innovation, and internationalization in SMEs: a systematic review. In: Academy of International Business UK & Ireland Chapter (AIB-UKI) Conference.
    Inter-organizational collaboration (IOC) has been widely claimed as influential in enhancing SMEs innovation and internationalization performance. However, the literature on this topic is fragmented, consistent views on the relationships between the three constructs (IOC, innovation and internationalization) is largely missed. To address this gap, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review (with narrative synthesis technique) of 117 empirical studies published between 2000 and 2016 that address relationships between these three constructs (IOC-innovation, IOC-internationalization, and IOC-innovating-internationalization) in SMEs setting. Our study reveals that there is an upward trend (yet varies across the three relationships) in publishing articles on this subject overtime. In addition, we show the building blocks underpinning the dominating variables in these studies including enablers, moderators, mediators, and outcomes. Overall, the analysis suggests that while IOC, innovation and internationalization research has made significant progress over the years, there are still substantial gaps in the literature, which leave important areas for further investigation.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O. and Leach, D. (2017). Alliance Management Capabilities in Non-Market Setting: The Case of Cross-Sector Collaboration. In: Academy of Management Proceedings. Academy of Management, p. 16347. Available at: https://journals.aom.org/doi/10.5465/AMBPP.2016.16347abstract.
    Alliance management capabilities (AMCs) are typically perceived as higher-order resources that can affect an organization’s ability to derive value from inter-organizational collaboration. Extant research has predominantly focused on business-to-business relationships. In this paper, we examine AMCs in a nontraditional (non-market) context: nongovernment-business collaboration (NBC). Furthermore, we assess AMCs from the perspective of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Using qualitative data obtained from interviews with 38 employees (who represented 26 UK- based NGOs), along with evidence from organizational documents, we identified three distinct groups of NGO-specific AMCs: pre- collaboration, post-collaboration, and hybrid capabilities. These capabilities embody the way in which NGOs attract, establish, and manage collaborative linkages with businesses. In particular, the hybrid capabilities, which are utilized before and during the collaboration, emphasize the importance of learning processes and stakeholder management throughout the collaboration process. More general, the findings show that NGOs leverage their AMCs through two strategic actions, namely exploring and exploiting, which contributes to the Resource-Based View theory by explaining the pathway between capabilities and realized value.
  • Zahoor, N., Al-Tabbaa, O. and Anchor, J. (2016). Alliance Management Capabilities and Internationalization: The Mediating Role of Innovation. In: The 36th SMS (Strategic Management Society) Annual International Conference. Available at: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/30115/.
    Despite the abundance of research on the internationalization of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) sector, we know little about the relationship between alliance management capabilities (AMC) and internationalization in this sector. Based on the resource-based view and capabilities perspective, we attempt to address this gap by offering a conceptual understanding of how AMC can impact on internationalization activity in terms of capabilities and performance. Specifically, we contend that radical and incremental co-innovations are necessary strategic actions to leverage the AMC when SMEs pursue internationalization. Furthermore, we suggest that partners’ diversity can moderate the link between AMC and co-innovation
  • Al-Tabbaa, O., Kolk, A. and Leach, D. (2016). On Meaningfulness Beyond Corporate Form: Exploring Cross-Sector Collaboration from NGOs Perspective. In: 2016 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2016.10496abstract.
    While interest in collaboration between business and non- governmental organizations (NGOs) has grown rapidly in the past decades, literature has underexposed the peculiarities of the NGO partner, compared to the ample attention for the perspective of the firm and the implications for society. In the context of growing uncertainty of government funding and budgetary constraints, NGOs have taken a more proactive approach of embracing partnerships with business to foster their organizational viability and strategic economic interests, in addition to their traditional focus on social value and meaningfulness. Using two complementary studies, one qualitative, the other more quantitative, we explore activities adopted by NGOs to generate resources and further their objectives in collaborating with firms, considering their strategy context, content and process, and how these reflected in their external communication and presentation, especially via organizational websites. Findings show the most prominent dimensions of NGOs’ strategy for partnerships, including the deployment of intrinsic and extrinsic attributes, the provision of specific options for collaboration, and evidence of past achievement to increase trustworthiness. Our findings also shed light on the factors relevant for firms seeking to partner with an NGO as a means to further their meaningfulness.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O. (2015). Did the nonprofit sector become strategic regarding working with businesses?. In: The Strategic Management Society 35th Annual International Conference,. Available at: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/24259/.
    Nonprofit-business collaboration (NBC) has become an important value creation mechanism for both society and businesses. This value creation process, however, has been rarely considered from the nonprofit perspective, in particular how they plan to attract prospective business partners. We address this gap by investigating the website content of NPOs that actively engage with the business sector. The results show that active-in-collaboration NPOs do have a strategic orientation towards the collaboration with the business sector. Importantly, the analysis reveals four common attributes across the sample, which provide insights into the features of the NBC strategy from the NPOs standpoint.
  • Strategizing Organizational Emergency Management: Strategies-as-Practice Perspective (2014). In: 34th Strategic Management Society Conference.
    Emergency management (EM) in the oil and gas industry is of strategic importance to organizations as it can have impact on people’s lives and organizational reputation. This developmental paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding organizational EM strategies by considering the micro-level activity of emergency response and responders in shaping strategy at the macro-level. The practices of key organizational responders during emergencies are strategic because they draw on strategic plans and are crucial to strategic outcomes. However, these key participants may not have formal strategy roles. It is argued that an understanding of whether and how their practices are incorporated into practices that shape strategy may situate them closer to the centre of strategizing activities; from outsiders to insiders.
  • Al-Tabbaa, O. and Leach, D. (2013). From beggar to partner: nonprofit-business collaboration as a strategic choice for the nonprofits. In: Academy of Management Conference. Academy of Management. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.5465/AMBPP.2013.13686abstract.
    Nonprofit-Business collaboration (NBC) has been widely investigated, being regarded as a value creation mechanism for society (by providing better solutions to address complex social issues) and business (by delivering economic gains as part of social responsibility programs). NBC from the perspective of nonprofit organizations (NPOs), however, has been overlooked, in particular how they plan strategically to attract prospective business partners. In this paper, we propose a framework to facilitate NPOs’ strategy development and assess its relevance with data obtained from 15 NPOs. In general, findings indicate that the framework captures the foundations of effective strategy in terms of the number and quality of collaborations. The paper provides recommendations for practice and new research directions.

Monograph

  • Elliott, C., Al-Tabbaa, O., Semeyutin, A. and Tchouamou Njoya, E. (2017). An Economic and Social Evaluation of the UK Subsea Cables Industry. European Subsea Cables Association (ESCA).
    This research report seeks to estimate the value of the UK subsea cables industry, considering its value to 1) the digital economy, and 2) the electricity industry.
    An initial estimate of the economic value of the UK telecommunications subsea cables industry to the digital economy values it at £62.8 billion per annum. The impact of the UK electricity subsea cables industry is smaller but still significant at £2.8 billion per annum.
    The economic value of the UK subsea cables industry both for the telecommunications and energy sectors is then measured in more detail using the Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) modelling approach that has increasingly overtaken the more traditional Cost Benefit Analysis approach to computing economic values. This analysis also provides estimates of the impact of changes in the industry on various sectors of the economy, as well as on the macro economy. Yet first a qualitative research methodology, namely a Comprehensive Impact Evaluation Framework is applied to identify benefits of the UK subsea cables industry to multiple stakeholders in the telecommunications and energy sectors. By identifying the relevant direct and indirect stakeholders, this ensures that the CGE models developed are as accurate as possible.
    The stakeholder analysis also allows us to going beyond a monetary analysis of the potential benefits of the subsea cables industry, by identifying the range of stakeholders positively impacted by the presence of the UK subsea cables industry. In the telecommunications sector there are benefits to businesses and households from better quality and speed of digital communication, as well as improved reliability of Internet connectivity. These benefits translate into improved business efficiency, improved ability to manage people and processes, as well as improved opportunities for the international communication of product and process innovations. In the electricity sector, the use of subsea cables is vital for the import and export of electricity, as well as to connect offshore electricity production to the mainland electricity grid system. Hence, subsea cables ensure improved reliability and security of electricity supplies, as well as access to international markets. Given that offshore electricity production is a vital part of renewables electricity production in the UK, this production has environmental benefits and contributes to reduced pollution and the UK’s better ability to meet pollution reduction targets.
    The qualitative and quantitative analyses combine to highlight the positive value of the UK subsea cables industry both on the telecommunications and electricity market sectors. The impact on the telecommunications sector is larger as was to be expected given the importance of this sector on the UK economy as a whole, while subsea cables are of importance in the electricity market predominantly in terms of electricity imports and exports, and the production of electricity from off-shore wind farms.
    Not only is the UK subsea cables market important in terms of its impact on the telecommunications and electricity sectors, but the quantitative analysis has highlighted the benefits of future growth in the UK subsea cables industry on UK macroeconomic variables including GDP; consumer income; capital formation; exports and imports and government revenues. Growth in the UK telecommunications subsea cables industry is likely positively to impact the UK financial and insurance sector the most, while growth in the UK electricity subsea cables industry is expected to have its greatest positive impact on the UK manufacturing industry.

Research report (external)

  • Caroline, E., Al-Tabbaa, O., Semeyutin, A. and Tchouamou, E. (2016). An Economic and Social Evaluation of the UK Sub-Sea Cables Industry. [Online]. University of Huddersfield. Available at: http://www.escaeu.org/download/?Id=363.
    This research report seeks to estimate the value of the UK subsea cables industry, considering its value to 1) the digital economy, and 2) the electricity industry. An initial estimate of the economic value of the UK telecommunications subsea cables industry to the digital economy values it at £62.8 billion per annum. The impact of the UK electricity subsea cables industry is smaller but still significant at £2.8 billion per annum. The economic value of the UK subsea cables industry both for the telecommunications and energy sectors is then measured in more detail using the Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) modelling approach that has increasingly overtaken the more traditional Cost Benefit Analysis approach to computing economic values. This analysis also provides estimates of the impact of changes in the industry on various sectors of the economy, as well as on the macro economy. Yet first a qualitative research methodology, namely a Comprehensive Impact Evaluation Framework is applied to identify benefits of the UK subsea cables industry to multiple stakeholders in the telecommunications and energy sectors. By identifying the relevant direct and indirect stakeholders, this ensures that the CGE models developed are as accurate as possible. The stakeholder analysis also allows us to going beyond a monetary analysis of the potential benefits of the subsea cables industry, by identifying the range of stakeholders positively impacted by the presence of the UK subsea cables industry. In the telecommunications sector there are benefits to businesses and households from better quality and speed of digital communication, as well as improved reliability of Internet connectivity. These benefits translate into improved business efficiency, improved ability to manage people and processes, as well as improved opportunities for the international communication of product and process innovations. In the electricity sector, the use of subsea cables is vital for the import and export of electricity, as well as to connect offshore electricity production to the mainland electricity grid system. Hence, subsea cables ensure improved reliability and security of electricity supplies, as well as access to international markets. Given that offshore electricity production is a vital part of renewables electricity production in the UK, this production has environmental benefits and contributes to reduced pollution and the UK’s better ability to meet pollution reduction targets. The qualitative and quantitative analyses combine to highlight the positive value of the UK subsea cables industry both on the telecommunications and electricity market sectors. The impact on the telecommunications sector is larger as was to be expected given the importance of this sector on the UK economy as a whole, while subsea cables are of importance in the electricity market predominantly in terms of electricity imports and exports, and the production of electricity from off-shore wind farms. Not only is the UK subsea cables market important in terms of its impact on the telecommunications and electricity sectors, but the quantitative analysis has highlighted the benefits of future growth in the UK subsea cables industry on UK macroeconomic variables including GDP; consumer income; capital formation; exports and imports and government revenues. Growth in the UK telecommunications subsea cables industry is likely positively to impact the UK financial and insurance sector the most, while growth in the UK electricity subsea cables industry is expected to have its greatest positive impact on the UK manufacturing industry.

Forthcoming

  • Alhyari, A., Al-Tabbaa, O. and Zeng, M. (2020). Government Business Model Innovation: Multi Stakeholders Collaborations in Ecosystems. In: British Academy of Management Conference (2020).
    Governments are increasingly investing in innovation-centric initiatives aiming to offer new alternatives for improving public value creation, especially in emerging economies which are assuming a more leading position in the global economy. While several studies can be found on different forms of public sector innovation, research on business models innovation in this sector is still limited. Thus, this study aims to investigate government business model innovation and value creation focusing on public and private multi stakeholder collaborations in ecosystems. Understanding how governments and multi-actors collaborations are driving the growth of ecosystems have important implications and gains to the fields of strategy and management. Guided by the revealed Government BMI, policymakers and managers will have a new innovation alternative aligned with strategy towards an enhanced public value creation. Whereas, the BMI ecosystem multi-stakeholders approach is expected to affect managing the entire ecosystem sector prosperously.
  • Odat, S., Al-Tabbaa, O. and Khan, Z. (2020). Business Model Innovation in the Sharing Economy: integrating activity system and dynamic capabilities perspectives. In: BAM 2020 Proceedings. British Academy of Management.
    The Digital Platform Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (DPSMEs) introduced to the world as a disruptive innovation with a new BMI. Yet, this innovation process is still unknown in literature. This paper discusses a new framework to investigate the dynamic process of innovating DPSMEs activities in BM. This study argues that BMI as change process of set of activities in BM (including; scan the environment, identify the possibilities and threats, and assess them) rely upon the abilities of firm to sense the global opportunities and threats, the ability to recognize and translate these opportunities to the need to change by developing different alternative of BM themes (NICE) before downsizing them and selecting a dominant theme, and the ability to redesign, reconfigure, and innovate BM elements (content, structure, and governance) by investing in new resources. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
  • The effects of autonomous contracting on inter-organisational relationships: A process model of trust, social capital and value co-creation (2020). In: BAM 2020 Proceedings. British Academy of Management.
    Engaging in relationships with other organisations through the deployment of autonomous technologies offers a substantial improvement for the efficiency by ensuring that the inter-organisational business processes are better scheduled, coordinated, executed, and monitored. One manifestation of this trend is autonomous contracting, also known as blockchain-based smart contracting, which enables an autonomous execution of pre-defined digital agreements. However, little is known about how such technologies influence firms’ relational resources such as trust and social capital that aid the conduct of social affairs, and subsequently affect performance. This study therefore investigated the social processes and the outcomes of inter-organisational relationships in the autonomous contracting settings through semi-structured interviews (N = 25) with executives of firms that either use the technology or facilitate its implementation. The findings revealed the conducive effect of autonomous contracting for value-co-creation by the firms. The findings also revealed that autonomous contracting facilitates co-creation of value through enabling system trust and enhancing social capital. The study contributes to the inter-organisational relationship literature and our understanding of how interfirm relationships can evolve in the autonomous contracting settings.
  • Simdul, M., Al-Tabbaa, O. and Amankwah-Amoah, J. (2020). Business model innovation, renewable energy application and the scalability of SME’s in sub-Saharan Africa. In: BAM 2020 Proceedings. British Academy of Management.
    This study is situated in Business Model Innovation, an emerging field in management literature. The concept seeks to describe the re-inventive strategies businesses adopt towards maintaining value propositions and competitive advantage. Ability to achieve this is largely dependent on accessibility to requisite resources within the given environment of the business. This is applicable to businesses faced with enhancing their growth potential with significant resource constraints in challenging environments. Small and Medium scale enterprises tend to experience such challenges especially within developing countries. Understanding the essential factors and capabilities which assist them in the business model innovation process creates an avenue for research furtherance. Based on this, the research intends to examine the identified phenomenon through a multiple case study analysis of SME companies in the renewable energy industry within Nigeria, a developing country.
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