Kent Graduate School

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Advanced Training at Kent

Workshops for 2016-17

 

Kent offers a wide range of advanced training workshops delivered by world class researchers drawn from a range of disciplines. The workshops are not necessarily discipline specific, but instead explore topics of interest to researchers in social, natural and medical sciences, as well as the arts and humanities.

Workshops are open to doctoral and postdoctoral researchers, early-career researchers, research staff and non-university researchers (unless otherwise stated). Please see individual course descriptions for information regarding fees and course eligibility. Postgraduate researchers studying at universities which form part of Kent’s Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTPs) are eligible for a fee waiver.

To book or for more information, please contact advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk.

Forthcoming Workshops

Digital Film for Research and Public Engagement

Date and Time: 2.00pm Monday 5 June 2017 - 5.00pm Tuesday 6 June

Open to: Postgraduate research students

Description:

A one and a half day workshop for PhD candidates with Professor Paul Allain and Stacie Lee Bennett exploring digital film for presenting research and enabling public engagement.

This hands-on workshop will address both practical and theoretical issues surrounding the use of digital media as a tool for doctoral projects across all disciplines.

The workshop is open to all CHASE-funded students and Arts and Humanities PhD students at CHASE institutions. 

If participants have their own digital media, please feel free to bring these to work with them under the leaders’ guidance during the workshop.

Trainer: Dr Paul Allain and Stacey Lee Bennett

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates and free to PGRs at CHASE institutions,*

Booking: Please complete the registration form at http://www.chase.ac.uk/film-for-research to apply for a space. Please direct any queries to enquiries@chase.ac.uk.

*CHASE institutions include Kent, UEA, Essex, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS.

Introduction to Health Research 2: Developing your Research Question

Date and Time: 30 May 2017, 1.00pm – 4.00pm

Description:

This workshop is part of a series of three half day workshops on the Introduction to Health Research, run by KentHealth in conjunction with the Graduate School. The aim of these workshops is to provide an overview of the ever-changing landscape of health research, including important definitions and concepts. The second workshop in the series includes an introduction to the pragmatics of health research in the UK, including permissions required to access patients (including the researcher's own patients) for research. This includes how long it takes to recruit patients and how to be realistic about the numbers of patients able to recruit.

Trainer: Dr Julie Hedayioglu.

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£40 all other participants.

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

Introduction to Health Research 3: Research Study Design and Management

Date and Time: 27 June 2017, 1.00pm – 4.00pm

This workshop is part of a series of three half day workshops on the Introduction to Health Research, run by KentHealth in conjunction with the Graduate School. The aim of these workshops is to provide an overview of the ever-changing landscape of health research, including important definitions and concepts. The third workshop in the series includes an overview of research methods in health. In the workshop the question of how to identify important clinical research questions will be addressed. There will also be an overview of research methods in health.

Trainer: Dr Julie Hedayioglu.

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£40 all other participants.

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

Principles of Geographical Information Systems: 3 day workshop

Date and Time:Saturday 13 May 2017 (9pm-5pm), Sunday 14 May 2017 (9pm-5pm), Monday 15 May 2017 (9pm-5pm), (Participants will need to attend all three days.)   

Open to: Postgraduate researchers as well as researchers.

Description:

The overall aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of GIS as well as an introduction to a range of methods for collection, management and interpretation of spatial data.  Particular attention is paid to the development of students’ analysis skills to deal with spatial data using GIS. This workshop will run for 3 consecutive days, 6 hours per day combining theoretical, tutorial and practical sessions. The tutorial and practical sessions will provide hands-on experience using ArcGIS which is the most widely used GIS system.
The workshop will cover:

  • Principles of cartography, coordinate systems and projections
  • Introduction to the fundamental principles of GIS
  • Data sources and methods of data acquisition
  • Types of spatial data, working with raster and vector data
  • Mapping (how to create and transform maps)
  • ArcGIS -overview of ArcGIS, ArcMap, ArcCatalog; ArcToolbox, Spatial Analyst
  • GIS operations (Calculating area, Intersection of polygons etc.)
  • Data manipulation, spatial data query and spatial analysis

Trainer: Dr Joseph Tzanopoulos.

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£180 other researchers: (non-Kent staff, alumni, charity, not for profit organisations)

£270 external/commercial participants.

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

New Directions in Visual Methodologies

Date and Time: 17 May 2017 from 10am-5.30pm

Description and Trainers:

Session 1: Dr Mike Poltorak: The Video Camera and Research

In this session we will use experiential based and practical video exercises to explore the multiple uses of the video camera to record, research, explore feedback methodologies and to create a 'shared anthropology'. We will also explore the multiple assumptions of what the camera does to social dynamics with the aim of identifying how the video camera may be useful for your particular research.  

Session 2: Dr Dawn Lyon: Using Audio-Visual Methods to explore Everyday Life

In this session we will consider the combination of time-lapse photography and sound as a means to document social space and render it in a form through which we can analyse key anthropological and sociological themes such as rhythm, movement, interaction, atmosphere, and the production of space. We’ll undertake a practical exercise to analyse a short film and discuss the gains and limitations of using audio-visual material in this way.

Session 3: Dr Erin Sanders-McDonagh: Mapping the social world using multi-sensory methods

This session explores new directions in visual methodologies by considering visual methods as part of a larger multisensory approach. We will look at an example of an ethnographic project in London that uses multi-sensory methods to map the city. Students will be introduced to different approaches to mapping the city, including smell mapping, neon mapping, and artefact trails. We will undertake a practical exercise where students will carry out a smell mapping exercise on campus, thinking about the ways different smells impact sense of place. We will analyse findings collectively and think about different ways of expressing/presenting findings.

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£60 other researchers: (non-Kent staff, alumni, charity, not for profit organisations)

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

R workshop - 4 day workshop

Dates and Times: 20, 21, 24, 25 July 2017, 9.00pm – 5.00pm (please note: you must be available to attend all four days)

Description:

R is an interactive computing environment and programming language designed for statistical analysis and graphics. R provides access to an ever expanding library of sophisticated routines and it is increasingly used in many fields of research including economics, medicine, biology and social science. The aim of this workshop is to help participants, including research students, to get started on their own data analysis. The target audience are people with basic statistical knowledge but little or no programming experience.

Topics will include:

  • an introduction to the R environment
  • the use of packages and libraries and other R basics
  • reading in data and data analysis, linear and related (eg generalised linear) models, hypothesis testing, statistical modelling, function optimisation, and other more advanced techniques.

Please note this is a 4 day workshop and you must attend all 4 days.

Trainer: Dr Takis Besbeas.

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£240 for other researchers: (non-Kent staff, alumni, charity, not for profit organisations)

£360 for commercial participants.

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

 


 

5

world class teaching

collaboration opportunities

excellent facilities

thought-provoking topics

networking opportunities

“Fantastic lecturer! Very enthusiastic, made the training very interesting and engaging.  Great lectures:practicals ratio!”

(‘R' Workshop’)

 

“Without this workshop I never would have been able to complete a systematic review satisfactory for publication or my PhD research.”

(Systematic Review Methods)

 

“Brilliant training - entertaining, practical, very interesting”.

(‘GIS': Principles of Geographic Information Systems)

 

“The session was well organised & conducted so that there was a good and relaxed atmosphere. The leader was well informed & open to questions & interaction with participants. After the break, the student contribution was excellent.”.

(Critical Methods 1: A Philosophical Overview)

 

“I will be applying what I've learned [in the multilevel analysis workshop] to do the analysis for my thesis”.

(Multilevel analysis workshop)

 

“I found it very practical and applied, so really useful for planning fieldwork”.

(‘Fieldwork in Challenging Circumstances’)

 


 

Advanced Training Portfolio

Below are advanced training workshops which have previously been offered at Kent. If you are interested in attending a course on any of these topics please contact advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

VIEW WORKSHOPS

Psychometric Scale Construction

Description:

This course held over two days will enable you to design, develop and evaluate your own psychometric scale (test/questionnaire/survey).

The facilitator will introduce participants to modern psychometric methods enabling them to design and develop valid and reliable tests / questionnaires / surveys. The workshop will combine lectures with hands-on practical exercises in a computer class using R – a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics.
Participants will learn the following concepts:
1. Developing a questionnaire: content mapping, issues to consider; good item writing practice. 
2. Principles of measurement scales; model-based measurement.
3. Test homogeneity and validity: factor models for continuous, binary and ordinal data.
4. Test scoring – classical methods and methods based on estimated factor scores.
5. Measurement precision and reliability – classical and modern approaches.

Please note: Participants must be familiar with basic statistics (descriptive statistics, correlation, regression and hypotheses testing). Some familiarity with factor analysis is desirable, but it is not essential.

It is assumed that participants are completely new to R. Practical exercises are designed so that R functionality needed for analysis of psychometric scales is introduced gradually. However, this is not a course in R – therefore, participants experienced in R will find the course just as useful.

Trainer: Dr Anna Brown

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£120 other researchers: (non-Kent staff, alumni, charity, not for profit organisations)

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

Introduction to Health Research 1: Health Research - The UK Landscape

Description:

The Introduction to Health Research workshop provides an overview of the important definitions and concepts, agencies (e.g. CRN, AHSN, CCGs, NHS Trusts etc), and processes involved in health research in the UK. The workshop is an introduction to the ever-changing landscape of health research and aims to provide you with a greater understanding of the processes involved in undertaking health research, as well as highlight the agencies that are available to support you in this endeavour. You will gain a greater understanding of the processes involved in undertaking health research, and become aware of the agencies available to support this endeavour. The session is invaluable for anyone starting out in this area, especially postgraduates, as well as for those who wish to refresh their knowledge. As the workshop is open to both academics and clinicians it is hoped that this will bring diverse and fruitful discussions as well as networking opportunities. There are three workshops in the series.

Trainer: Dr Julie Hedayioglu.

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£40 all other participants.

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

Application of Multilevel Analysis for Quantitative Social Science - 2-day workshop

Description:

Day one

Day one will consist of theoretical parts and one practical session. Participants will be given an introduction to multilevel modeling (MLM) and will learn the theoretical basis of random intercept models. They will then apply what they have learnt in a practical session, which will teach students how to conduct and interpret random intercept and random slope models in SPSS and STATA.


Day two

On the second day participants will learn about random slope models, and how to add contextual variables and interpret interactions. Participants will also learn about practical applications of MLM. They will also be introduced to different ways in which MLM results can be presented in their papers. In the practical afternoon session participants will be given the opportunity to work on their own data and or use the data provided to them to answer their own research question. The students are given the opportunity to present this work to the class, and get expert feedback from the course leaders. This provides an informal, comfortable environment in which participants can share their thoughts, feelings and concerns of their own MLM data analyses with the staff experts and other peers. This will provide participants with a unique, innovative opportunity to understand how MLM methods apply to different disciplines, which is important for the advancement of social sciences.

The course will be innovative in its approach to teaching MLM by providing both theoretical and practical parts, which give participants the opportunity to apply what they have learnt. Students will have the opportunity to informally present their own work, which will provide a vital opportunity to receive feedback from experts and peers. It will also give students a deeper understanding of interdisciplinary uses of MLM.

What you will learn

  • You will understand the ideas behind Multi-level analysis
  • You will learn the pros and cons of the method
  • You will learn when or when not to apply the model
  • You will learn how to run your own multi-level models
  • You will learn how to interpret the analysis outcomes
  • You will learn how to interpret multilevel analysis outcomes of others

Prerequisite

Students should have a working understanding of a regression model, and some experience having used either SPSS or STATA software packages.

Information regarding presentations

In our program you will see that on day 2 in the afternoon, we have a slot allocated for participants' presentations. This is a time slot where we encourage participants to present their own research to get direct feedback. The presentations should be questions concerning whether a multi-level approach is appropriate for this research and how to apply multi-level approaches to it, etc. From the previous workshops we have seen that the participants benefit greatly from this exercise, because they get intensive and very practical assistance on multi-level modelling, which helps them to move forth in actually putting the approach to practice. Due to time restrictions, we may not have time for all participants present. However, we encourage those of you who have either a set of problems in applying multi-level approaches to your research, or those of you who are not sure how to use a multi-level approach to your research question to present and make the most of this session.

The workshop will be delivered by:

Dr Heejung Chung

Dr Hannah Swift

Interpretative Methods: Hermeneutics for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Description:

These sessions investigate a series of methods for the interpretation of texts in the human and social sciences. By building on the philosophical foundations of interpretive methods, as well as practicing these methods, the sessions will give researchers the intellectual background and skills to interpret texts in various forms. The sessions will focus on three key aspects of interpretative methods:

  1. Phenomenology. What are the philosophical reasons behind the rise of interpretive methods? By engaging with the works of Hume and Hegel, this introduction session sets out the epistemological problem at the source of interpretive methods: the question of how human beings are to know the outside world at all if they only have access to it through the way it appears to us (the phenomena).
  2. Hermeneutics. How are we to interpret human action, particularly human action that is given to us in textual format? Hermeneutics, as the science of interpretation provides concrete methods for the study of texts and their authors, and provides answers for the philosophical question around these methods. By reading Gadamer on two issues: the hermeneutic cycle and the problem of application, this second session provides a philosophical and practical introduction to the method of hermeneutics.
  3. Contextualism. When looking at historical texts, what is the importance of the particular context within which they were written? Does this context necessarily influence and explain the texts, or can the texts be read on their own? The Cambridge School of intellectual history has defended the importance of historical context in interpreting the past, and this gave rise to a methodological debate in the human and social sciences. By focusing on the work of Skinner and the critique he faced from Bevir, this third session provides the student with a focused application of interpretive methods on a historical author of their choice.

By the end of the sessions, participants are expected to:

  1. Acquire a detailed understanding of the key philosophical issues underlying the problem of interpretation in the humanities and social sciences.
  2. Be able to use the insights of phenomenology as an epistemic device when it comes to approaches to textual material.
  3. Become familiar with the key tenants of hermeneutics, notably the hermeneutic cycle and the problem of application.
  4. Have critically engaged with the thought of Hans-Georg Gadamer and understood the key challenges hermeneutics poses to the methodology of the natural sciences.
  5. Develop heuristic devices based on the study of hermeneutics to apply to the reading of particular texts.

This workshop is particularly helpful for those whose main materials in their research are texts, whether historical or contemporary, literary or philosophical, theoretical or practical. Based on the development of a hermeneutic ontology, a phenomenological method, and the application of these heuristic devices to the study of texts, this workshop proposes an in-depth introduction to interpretative methods for the student of humanities or social sciences. Two readings will be required each week from the participants. These will be provided to attendees.

Session 1: David Hume, A Treatise on Human Nature, Vol. I, Part III, sections 6, 7, and 8. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Phenomenology of the Spirit, Preface.

Session 2: Hans-Georg Gadamer, Truth and Method, Chapter 4, Part 1. Hans-Georg Gadamer, Dialogue and Dialectic: Eight Hermeneutical Studies on Plato, Chapter 6.

Session 3: Quentin Skinner, ‘Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas Reviewed,’ History and Theory, Vol. 8, No. 1 (1969), pp. 3-53. Mark Bevir, ‘Objectivity in History,’ History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Oct., 1994), pp. 328-344.

Trainer: Dr Charles Devellennes

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£180 other researchers: (non-Kent staff, alumni, charity, not for profit organisations)

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

Innovation and Careers in Conservation and the Environment

Description:

The career opportunities within the conservation and environment sector are diverse but highly competitive. Getting a first foot on the ladder is often the most difficult step for postgraduates. With contributions from three experienced practitioners working in this sector, this workshop will explore the qualifications, skills, and career development opportunities that lie within the professional conservation and environment sector. For those seeking to further their academic careers, tips and guidance will be also provided on applying for postdoctoral funding.  Lunch is provided.

The session features a chaired panel discussion and will cover:

  • How to forge a career in the environmental sciences (career paths, the role of postgraduate training, skills needs and working with partners)
  • Career opportunities in environmental sciences
  • Applying for postdoctoral research funding

Schedule:

12.30-1.30: Arrive, lunch provided.

1.30-2.30: How to forge a career in the environmental sciences: 3 x 15 min short talks by conservation and environmental science professionals.
These will cover career paths, the role of postgraduate training, skills needs and working with partners.

  • Dr John Wilkinson (Regional, Training and Science Programmes Manager - Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Trust)
  • Rufus Howard (Director of Sustainable Development – Royal Haskoning DHV)
  • Dr Julia Baker (Biodiversity Officer - Balfour Beatty)

2.30-2.45: Bruce Woodcock (Careers and Employability Officer) Career opportunities in environmental sciences: what can the University careers service offer?

2.45-3.15: Tea/coffee

3.15-4.00: Applying for postdoctoral research funding: Dr Alexandra Leduc-Pagel (Research and International Development Officer, University of Kent)

4.00-4.30: Chaired panel discussion and round-up.

 

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£60 other researchers: (non-Kent staff, alumni, charity, not for profit organisations)

£90 external/commercial participants.

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

Camera Trapping: Data Capture, Processing and Analysis

Description:

The use of camera trapping as way to survey animal populations has gained wide popularity with scientists working in a range of environments worldwide. This non-invasive technique allows the researcher to gain an insight into the hidden world of some of the most elusive wild animals in some of the most challenging regions on the planet. This workshop will cover key aspects of setting up a systematic camera trapping survey in the field. The course will examine the various research and conservation needs for which remote cameras provide a powerful survey tool. The workshop will discuss implications for survey design as well as the practicalities involved in creating and conducting a camera trap study. Time will also be given to discussing the variety of equipment available, designing a camera trap project (including using cameras in the tree canopy) along with software tools useful in analysing and managing camera trap data and introducing some analytical approaches.
Attendees will also be provided with a list of literature and resources to assist them with camera trap planning, how to maximise the impact of camera trap images/videos and data processing and analysis.

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the pros and cons of using camera traps
  2. Understand the different types of camera traps and how they can be used for different surveys
  3. Be versed in different camera trap designs and survey types and decide which may best apply to their target species or different landscapes
  4. Understand how best to set up a camera trap and the kinds of logistical details to think about when doing so
  5. Manage camera trap data both in the field and for analysis
  6. Understand how to camera trap data are processed and be versed in some of the types of analysis employed with camera trap data

The workshop will be delivered by: Dr Susan Cheyne and Dr Rajan Amin

Dr. Susan Cheyne (http://www.susancheyne.com/) is the Co-Director of called Borneo Nature Foundation (http://www.borneonaturefoundation.org/en/) which has been running a long-term camera trapping project. She is also an Honorary Research Fellow of the School of Anthropology and Conservation at the University of Kent.  

Dr. Rajan Amin is a Senior Wildlife Biologist with the Zoological Society of London (http://www.zsl.org/users/rajan-amin) and he is an expert in the use of camera trapping for surveying and monitoring wildlife.

SCHEDULE


10:00-11:00         Introduction to camera trapping. This session will cover the different models and capabilities of camera traps, operational details and constraints and why the use of camera traps is becoming more common in conservation biology. (Dr. Susan Cheyne)


11:00-11:30         COFFEE BREAK

11:30-13:00         Setting up a systematic camera trapping survey in the field: Review of survey types and design. This session will cover key aspects of setting up systematic camera trap surveys in the field. The session will examine the various survey types for which remote cameras provide a powerful survey tool. (Dr. Susan Cheyne)

13:00-14:00         LUNCH BREAK

14:00-15:00     Overview of ZSL Camera Trap Analysis Tool (ZSL-CTAT) This is a comprehensive tool for the analysis of data form camera trap arrays. The newly developed ZSL camera trap data analysis tool will be presented along with case studies.The tool is freely available to all conservationists for species and biodiversity monitoring. (Dr.  Rajan Amin)

15:00-15:30         COFFEE BREAK

15:30-17:00         Logistics & camera trap equipment: how to set up camera traps and what to think about when doing so (inside, some outdoors-weather permitting). We will discuss implications for survey design as well as the practicalities involved in creating and conducting a camera trap study. (Dr. Susan Cheyne)

Fees:

Free to Kent postgraduates (and Kent staff) and Free to PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions,*

£30 for all other PGRs

£60 for other researchers: (non-Kent staff, alumni, charity, not for profit organisations)

Booking: Please book your space by emailing advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

Ethnography and Social Crisis

Description:

The recent credit crisis, and the austerity measures enforced as a remedy to the crisis, have set new challenges for social analysis. In this workshop we consider the advantages of the ethnographic perspective, as a general analytical approach in social-scientific research, in a period of crisis and austerity. We also provide practical exercises aiming to build ethnographic confidence among young researchers and post-graduate students.
‘Ethnography’ is a broad epistemological framework for conducting research, which encompasses a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods. A foundational principle for ethnography is a commitment to interpreting and analysing social life as this is meaningful from the bottom-up: that is, as social life is understood at the local level, by social actors situated in everyday life.

The workshop will last for a day and build upon the experience of experienced ethnographers. They will make available some of their data to encourage participants to reflect upon ethnographic analysis. During the practical sessions of the workshop, participants will experiment with ethnographic interpretation, using fragments of ethnographic data from crisis-afflicted Greece, Spain and Portugal. The workshop serves as an opportunity to learn basic skills about ethnography, and evaluate some of the challenges of conducting ethnographic research in times of crisis.

No preparation prior to the workshop is necessary, other than an enthusiastic commitment to learn about the analytical tools of the ethnographic perspective.

This workshop is organised in cooperation with the Centre for Ethnographic Research (CER).

Trainers: Dr Dimitrios Theodossopoulos, Professor João de Pina-Cabral,

Critical Methods in the Social Sciences: A Philosophical Overview

Description:

The first part of this session will introduce the background to the idea of critical methods in the Social Sciences by reviewing their development within modern European philosophy. The questions orienting this part of the session will be:

  • What are the philosophical presumptions underpinning the modern concern with method?
  • In what ways have these presumptions been challenged within the tradition of modern European philosophy?
  • Is the idea of a critical method oxymoronic?
  • Are critical methods always historicist and/or normative?

The second part of the session will consider the ways in which these considerations can be taken into the field.  A third part of the session will invite some of the participants to join in the discussion by presenting their own research with a view to examining whether or not the idea of critical methods is pertinent to their research, what challenges they face if it is and how they intend to meet those challenges.

Trainer: Dr Iain McKenzie

Statistical models for wildlife population assessment and conservation

Description:

Within the environmental sector there is currently a shortage of practitioners equipped with the statistical modelling skills to carry out reliable population assessments. Consequently, environmental impact assessments (EIAs) and development mitigation projects often use population assessment protocols that are not fit-for-purpose. The skills shortage arises because (1) recent advances in statistical models for population assessment are largely confined to the academic sector with little penetration to the end-users; and (2) although many postgraduate programmes have a statistical modelling training component, this often fails to expose PhD students to new models in the area and the potential applications these have for conservation practice. This training programme will provide a cohort of PhD students and early career researchers/practitioners with the relevant modelling skills required for a career that involves wildlife population assessment for conservation.

The workshop will focus on ecological questions that arise in conservation practice and use real case study data. Training will include individual-based models, such as capture-recapture, but will also embrace scenarios more frequently used in EIA, such as batch-marked, presence/absence, site occupancy and counts. Applications will include newts, butterflies, birds, bees, beetles, ibex and bats. Each module will be accompanied by a practical computer session using R and each module builds on the last so that delegates build a portfolio of statistical skills.

More detailed information about the workshop timetable and training outcomes is available here.

Trainer: Dr Rachel McCrea

 

 

Introduction to R

Description:

R is a free software environment and programming language designed for statistical analysis and graphics. It is now common place in the environmental and biological sciences, and increasingly used in other research fields including economics, medicine, and social science. The aim of this course is to introduce R to participants, including research students, and outline basic and advanced modelling routines in the software. The target audience will have a reasonable knowledge of statistics, but little or no programming experience, allowing us to focus on implementation in R.

Topics will include:


1.       Introduction to R and how to format, visualise, explore and manipulate data.

2.       Performing basic statistics and linear regression with example data

3.       Generalise linear mixed modelling (GLMM) and model selection from start to finish.

The workshop will be delivered by: Dr Simon Tollington.

 

Using Systematic Review Methods in Social Sciences

Description:

This course will take a critical look at what Systematic Review methods are, and how we may make use of them within the social sciences. A key element of the move towards ‘what works’, systematic review methods form an important part of research carried out to inform policies. It has been argued that these are amongst the ‘best’ methods to inform policy due to their characterisation as unbiased methods producing more certain research evidence. During the course participants will gain an understanding of the background and development of the method as well as a view of how we can use it in the social sciences, and the particular methodological problems we may run into when doing so due to the particularities of social sciences.

The workshop will be delivered by: Dr Trude Sundberg.

The Use of Drones in Conservation Surveys and Assessments

Description:

Drones are proving to be an extremely cost-effective tool for gathering field data in conservation programmes. Drones can be used to collect data on species their distribution, abundance and their habitat. The most common method to do this is with standard cameras that obtain high-resolution images while the drone flies over an area. Aerial photographs can be stitched together to produce near real-time geo-referenced land-cover maps of surveyed areas and even 3-dimensional forest models. Drones can also be equipped with video cameras, thermal imaging cameras, and a host of other sensors which makes them useful for various applications in ecological and conservation research.

The workshop will be delivered by: Professor Serge Wich and Andy Goodwin

Serge Wich is a professor of primate biology at Liverpool John Moores University where he is course leader for the Wildlife Conservation and UAV Technology MSc. In 2011 Serge co-founded ConservationDrones.org a not for profit organisation established to promote and support the use of drones for conservation applications. 

Andy Goodwin is chief pilot at Remote Insight - a professional drone mapping, imaging and data processing company. Prior to founding Remote Insight Andy worked at Liverpool John Moores University and headed up their Civic Drones project – a knowledge exchange programme focusing on drone applications. Andy is also a Conservation Drones team member.

 

 

Principles of Geographical Information Systems: 3 day workshop

Description:

The overall aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of GIS as well as an introduction to a range of methods for collection, management and interpretation of spatial data.  Particular attention is paid to the development of students’ analysis skills to deal with spatial data using GIS. This workshop will run for 3 consecutive days, 6 hours per day combining theoretical, tutorial and practical sessions. The tutorial and practical sessions will provide hands-on experience using ArcGIS which is the most widely used GIS system.
The workshop will cover:

  • Principles of cartography, coordinate systems and projections
  • Introduction to the fundamental principles of GIS
  • Data sources and methods of data acquisition
  • Types of spatial data, working with raster and vector data
  • Mapping (how to create and transform maps)
  • ArcGIS -overview of ArcGIS, ArcMap, ArcCatalog; ArcToolbox, Spatial Analyst
  • GIS operations (Calculating area, Intersection of polygons etc.)
  • Data manipulation, spatial data query and spatial analysis

Trainer: Dr Joseph Tzanopoulos.

 

Application of Multilevel Analysis for Quantitative Social Science - 2-day workshop

Description:

Day one (9:30am - 5pm)

Day one will consist of two theoretical parts and one practical afternoon session. In the morning participants will be given an introduction to multilevel modeling (MLM) and will learn the theoretical basis of random intercept models. In the afternoon they will learn about random slope models, how to add contextual variables and interpret interactions. They will then apply what they have learnt in a practical session, which will teach students how to conduct and interpret random intercept and random slope models in SPSS and HLM.  


Day two (9:15am - 5pm)

On the second day participants will learn about advanced applications of MLM. They will be introduced to the application of MLM for repeated measures designs and will gain insights into practical issues of MLM. In the practical afternoon session participants will be given the opportunity to work on their own data and present this work to the class, and get feedback from the leader. This provides an informal, confortable environment in which participants can share their thoughts, feelings and concerns of their own MLM data analyses with the staff and other peers. This will provide participants with a unique, innovative opportunity to understand how MLM methods apply to different disciplines, which is important for the advancement of social sciences.

The course will be innovative in it approach to teaching MLM by providing both theoretical and practical parts, which give participants the opportunity to apply what they have learnt. Students will have the opportunity to informally present their own work, which will provide a vital opportunity to receive feedback from experts and peers. It will also give students a deeper understanding of how interdisciplinary uses of MLM.

 

New Directions in Visual Methodologies

Description and Trainers:

Session 1: Dr Mike Poltorak: The Video Camera and Research

In this session we will use experiential based and practical video exercises to explore the multiple uses of the video camera to record, research, explore feedback methodologies and to create a 'shared anthropology'. We will also explore the multiple assumptions of what the camera does to social dynamics with the aim of identifying how the video camera may be useful for your particular research.  

Session 2: Dr Dawn Lyon: Using Audio-Visual Methods to explore Everyday Life

In this session we will consider the combination of time-lapse photography and sound as a means to document social space and render it in a form through which we can analyse key anthropological and sociological themes such as rhythm, movement, interaction, atmosphere, and the production of space. We’ll undertake a practical exercise to analyse a short film and discuss the gains and limitations of using audio-visual material in this way.

Session 3: Dr Joseph Tzanopolous: Time and Space in Visual Anthropological Research

In this session we will focus on temporality and spatiality in anthropological research. We will explore how can this spatio-temporal perspective be integrated into our data production. Specifically, we will discuss an emerging field of geo-media and how these can serve to social science research. What are the situations and context in which geo-media matter? How can spatio-temporal informations can be integrated with audio-visual data? We will discuss technical specification of various ‘geo devices’ and methods that can be used (e.g. participatory geo-mapping). Last but not the least we will discuss the ethics of research in regard to geo-media.

 

Fieldwork in Challenging Circumstances

Description:

This one-day workshop addresses the key issues and obstacles which doctoral students face when preparing to conduct fieldwork in challenging circumstances – conflict zones, situations of criminality or violence where trust is difficult to establish, field sites afflicted by war or violent conflict, and other situations where human relations are disrupted and subject to destructive pressure. The workshop also addresses how ethnographers engage with their data and research sites after the completion of such fieldwork: most notably the process of writing and analysis; and the challenges associated with ongoing interactions with informants.

Students will have the opportunity to train with three anthropologists that possess significant research expertise on the challenges involved.

Through participation in this intensive advanced workshop, students will obtain a range of insights and key skills relating to conducting fieldwork in challenging circumstances: from planning and logistics, to interaction in the field, to writing up and maintaining contacts post-fieldwork. Participants will have the opportunity to network with doctoral candidates working on related themes, and discuss their research with internationally-recognised Kent anthropologists with a range of relevant expertise.

Session I – Trust and the Ethnographic Method - Dr. Andrew Sanchez

Ethnographers have traditionally sought to build trusting relationships with their research participants through lengthy periods of fieldwork. During data collection, this method secures access to topics that may be sensitive. Analytically, the method allows one to better interpret data that is often subjective. However, the ethnographic use of trust requires careful consideration in research contexts where fieldwork is conducted among aggressors, criminals and people whose interlocutors assume them to be socially destructive.

This session considers the methodological and ethical questions of how one negotiates an assumption of criminality, violence and misrepresentation on the part of key informants, and conversely how one gains the trust of others in environments of heightened cynicism and anxiety.

Session II – Fieldwork Realism in (Post)conflict Circumstances - Dr. David Henig

This workshop considers the methodological, logistical, security and ethical questions for conducting ethnographic fieldwork in (post)conflict circumstances. It proposes ‘fieldwork realism’ as a way to effectively operationalise ethnographic research under such circumstances. It focuses on three interconnected aspects of the research process. These are i) Realistic planning and what it entails (i.e. the feasibility of the research project, imagining scenarios and contingency plans); ii) 'Being there' and how to go about it (i.e. security strategies, 'informed consent' under such circumstances, what/when to collect data), and how to elicit data while 'away' due to various access restrictions; iii) Ethics and the post-fieldwork period.

Session III –‘Temporary Objectification’ and the Challenges of Writing-up - Dr Judith Bovensiepen

This part of the workshop focuses on the challenges of writing-up research carried out in challenging circumstances. While acknowledging that all anthropological fieldwork faces the problem of how to write about people with whom one had personal relationships, this problem is accentuated when research was carried out in a conflict or post-conflict setting. We discuss Kirstin Hastrup’s notion of “temporary objectification”, which suggests that anthropological knowledge is not just relational (i.e. always bound up with its object), but also ever-changing. While it achieves a form of closure during the process of writing, it never becomes fully-fixed. This session will explore to what extent “temporary objectification” might present a way of dealing with the ethical challenges of writing about challenging circumstances.

Trainers: Dr Judith Bovensiepen, Dr David Henig and Dr Andrew Sanchez.

 

Geographic Information Software (GIS) for Social Data and Crisis Mapping

Description:

This 3-day workshop will be focused on the use of GIS (Geographic Information Software) for the analysis and mapping of social crisis data in an interdisciplinary context. This workshop is suitable for participations with no prior experience with GIS, and is designed to give the participants the best set of skills for the work they need to do. GIS is relevant for a range of research areas, including and not limited to: in conflict analysis, crime and terrorism mapping, social unrest mapping e.g. riots, epidemiology, archaeology, urban planning, conservation, and migration. This workshop will provide participants with a range of transferable GIS skills which will allow them to understand complex spatial data, explore spatial data, use and apply GIS in various ways, and create a range of visualisations to present this data. This course will cover the introduction to QGIS software, mapping techniques, location geocoding, geoprocessing of spatial data, exploratory spatial data analysis, and visualisation. This workshop will use open source QGIS software (http://www.qgis.org/en/site/) available for all platforms (Mac/Windows/Linux) which participants will install on their own computers. The workshop will work with various political data sets. More information is available here.

 

The Analysis of Multivariate Data

Description:

The course will teach how to analyse multivariate data, of the type one finds in databases or surveys using the package SPSS.  During the first day we will learn how to use the package SPSS. There will be a review of descriptive statistics, emphasising graphical methods, extreme observations, and statistical reasonning. After this we will explore comparison between means. This will require a discussion of normality tests, parametric testing, and non-parametric testing. The approach will be based on class experiments and interpretation of computer output. We will also discuss analysis of classifications: chi-square tests for contingency tables with an introduction to the basic ideas of log-linear models. This will be followed by a discussion of measures of association including Goodman-Kruskal for ordinal data, covariance, and correlation. The second day will be devoted to regression models, including logistic regression. The third day will be concerned with proper multivariate analysis. I will introduce the ideas behind principal components analysis, and factor analysis. This will be done with the help of data sets I have used in my research. The final part of the course will be devoted to interpreting the results that we obtained with factor analysis. This will involve biplots (representation of variables and cases in the same figure), and cluster analysis.

Careers in Conservation and the Environment

Description:

The career opportunities within the conservation and environment sector are diverse but highly competitive. Getting a first foot on the ladder is often the most difficult step for postgraduates. With contributions from four experienced practitioners working in this sector, this workshop will explore the qualifications, skills, and career development opportunities that lie within the professional conservation and environment sector. For those seeking to further their academic careers, tips and guidance will be also provided on applying for postdoctoral funding.

 

Critical Methods in the Social Sciences 1: A Philosophical Overview

Description:

The first part of this session will introduce the background to the idea of critical methods in the Social Sciences by reviewing their development within modern European philosophy. The questions orienting this part of the session will be:

  • What are the philosophical presumptions underpinning the modern concern with method?
  • In what ways have these presumptions been challenged within the tradition of modern European philosophy?
  • Is the idea of a critical method oxymoronic?
  • Are critical methods always historicist and/or normative?

The second part of the session will consider the ways in which these considerations can be taken into the field.  A third part of the session will invite some of the participants to join in the discussion by presenting their own research with a view to examining whether or not the idea of critical methods is pertinent to their research, what challenges they face if it is and how they intend to meet those challenges.

Trainer: Dr Iain McKenzie

Critical Methods in the Social Sciences 2: Creativity and Critique -

Description:

One of the central elements of critical methods is that they express a complex relationship between discovery and creativity. At the heart of this complexity is the philosophically rich notion of the event. After a scene-setting presentation into the major themes, the session will focus on open discussion related to the nature of events and how events relate to history and causality. 

At stake in these discussions will be questions that are especially pertinent for researchers using methods inspired by the dialectical tradition of modern European philosophy (for example, Hegelian and Marxist approaches) and for those that aim to use genealogical methods within their work (for example, Nietzschean and Foucauldian approaches). This session develops themes raised in the workshop on Critical Methods in the Social Sciences: A Philosophical Introduction but attendance at that workshop is NOT a prerequisite for attendance at this one.

Trainer: Dr Iain McKenzie, School of Politics and International Relations.

Critical Methods in the Social Sciences 3: Sense, Language and Critique

Description:

Many researchers in the social sciences are engaged in projects that require an in-depth appreciation of the nature of language. In this session we will discuss the linguistic turn in analytical and continental philosophy and the assumptions that orient these perspectives with a particular emphasis on the problem of sense and critique.

This session develops themes raised in the workshops on Critical Methods in the Social Sciences: A Philosophical Introduction and Critical Methods in the Social Sciences: Creativity and Critique but attendance at those workshops is NOT a prerequisite for attendance at this one. The overall aim is a free-flowing discussion oriented around the basic philosophical and methodological issues guiding critically oriented research in the social sciences.

The questions guiding this session will be:

  • Why is sense so important?
  • What is at the heart of the debate between poststructuralist, Critical Theorists and hermeneuticists?
  • To what extent can communicative approaches produce valid research and be guided by an emancipatory agenda?

Trainer: Dr Iain McKenzie, School of Politics and International Relations.

Fees: Free to Kent postgraduates, and PGRs in Kent doctoral training partnership institutions.*

Booking: This workshop is now fully booked. To add yourself to the waiting list please email advancedtraining@kent.ac.uk

*Kent is in a DTP with: UEA, Essex, Reading, RHUL, Surrey, Sussex, Goldsmiths, Open University, Birkbeck, The Courtauld Institute, SOAS, Roehampton, City University London

The problem with p-values: Null hypothesis significance testing and its critics across disciplines


I give a conceptual overview of the standard model of inferential statistics used in many sciences (null hypothesis significance testing or NHST, involving interpretation of p-values), and explain the reasons why some statisticians and journal editors have become dissatisfied with it. I explain several of the alternatives commonly proposed and distinguish between the more and less fruitful ones. I will also use my experience as a journal action editor and consumer of research in psychology to give examples of how the new statistics are changing criteria for evidence at our journals. The talk should help researchers used to working with p-values to navigate the often treacherous new landscape of effect sizes, confidence intervals and Bayes factors. Input on how you perceive matters in your field, especially from disciplines other than psychology, is highly welcome.


Trainer: Professor Roger Giner-Sorolla, Professor of Social Psychology.

 

Digital Humanities Masterclass

Description:

This Masterclass will present through first-hand experience the shifting nature of Digital Humanities over the last decade.  The Digital Humanities, both as a field of inquiry and as a set of practices, are changing the way we research, make arguments, and publish in the 21st century. We feel this change around us as much as we know it, with the pace of technological change materialized in the continually updating devices in our pockets. In fact, the cell phone is a good analogy for the Digital Humanities: it is at once a marvel of technology can do for us and a symbol of what we are missing while we look at the screen.


To say it directly, Digital Humanities brings new data and new tools, but also new misconceptions and new biases that will be explored in this masterclass.  It will be illustrated through examples drawn from the adoption of digital technologies to exemplify this trend. To explore this change, Eric Poehler will draw on two projects: one in the field at Pompeii (the Quadriporticus Project) and the other online (Pompeii Bibliography and Mapping Project).  Opportunities and pitfalls will be presented, alongside the behind-the-scenes operation of these projects. At the end of the masterclass, participants will have gained insight into the changing nature of academic practice and why Digital Humanities may suit some disciplines (e.g. Archaeology) more than others.

Ethnography and Social Crisis

Description:

The recent credit crisis, and the austerity measures enforced as a remedy to the crisis, have set new challenges for social analysis. In this workshop we consider the advantages of the ethnographic perspective, as a general analytical approach in social-scientific research, in a period of crisis and austerity. We also provide practical exercises aiming to build ethnographic confidence among young researchers and post-graduate students.

‘Ethnography’ is a broad epistemological framework for conducting research, which encompasses a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods. A foundational principle for ethnography is a commitment to interpreting and analysing social life as this is meaningful from the bottom-up: that is, as social life is understood at the local level, by social actors situated in everyday life.

The workshop will last for a day and build upon the experience of three experienced ethnographers. The latter will make available some of their data to encourage participants to reflect upon ethnographic analysis. During the practical sessions of the workshop, participants will experiment with ethnographic interpretation, using fragments of ethnographic data from crisis-afflicted Greece, Spain and Portugal. The workshop serves as an opportunity to learn basic skills about ethnography, and evaluate some of the challenges of conducting ethnographic research in times of crisis.

The draft programme (subject to final confirmation) is as follows:

Session One: The challenges of ethnography in times of crisis: austerity as aporia
Session Two:  Practising ethnography in times of crisis and austerity (1): solidarity networks in Greece
Session Three: Practising ethnography in times of crisis and austerity (2): lessons from a spanish enclave

Trainers: Dr Dimitrios Theodossopoulos, Professor João de Pina-Cabral,Dr Brian Campbell (Max Planck Institute, Halle)

Experimental Psychology Research Workshop: Best Practice in EEG & TMS Research

Description:

Electromagnetic recording and stimulation methods have recently seen a resurgence as methods for studying brain activity related to behaviour. In addition to classic evoked-potential paradigms (EEG, VEP), electrophysiological research now routinely involves signal processing procedures such as Fourier analysis, source reconstruction, and advanced statistical procedures. Furthermore, the combination of brain stimulation and electrophysiology is opening windows onto the causal role of brain activity in behaviour.  The goal of this workshop is to provide a venue for new researchers to learn about these methods as well as provide for advanced discussions between experts in the field. The workshop will involve two parallel streams, one covering a basic introduction to EEG and TMS aimed at researchers with no or very little previous experience. This will involve theoretical as well as practical sessions. The other stream will be aimed at researchers with experience who want to delve deeper into more advanced methodological issues and will be presented by invited experts in EEG and TMS research.

Innovative Tools and Methods for Behavioural Ecology

Description:

Quantitative behavioural research often requires two or more behavioural processes to be examined to see if they influence each other. This type of approach may also require the inclusion of other data types, such as physiological measurements. The Observer XT software offers the facility to rapidly collect and integrate multiple behavioural and non-behavioural measures. This session will introduce the concepts of good experiment design of coding schemes (ethograms), data collection (live and from video) and analysis. Other practical live coding data collection tools such Animal Behaviour Pro developed by the University of Kent will also be introduced, highlighting flexibility in usage and applications. This workshop will also address the pros and cons of different behavioural sampling and recording rules, as well as key tips for those working under sometimes challenging field conditions. 

 

MATLAB for Experimental Psychology

Description:

This three-day workshop will cover the basics of programming in MATLAB: data handling and plotting, functions and loops, and the use of the Psychophysics Toolbox in experiment design. The course is aimed at postgraduates who would like to start using the software package to run experiments and handle data, and no previous experience with MATLAB is necessary.

 

Mixing Methods in Political Science: From Triangualtion to Bridging the Quantitative-Qualitative Divide

Description:

The use of mixed-methods approaches in political research has been on the agenda for several years and the debate has highlighted the overall importance as well as the particular advantages of combining different methods. Among those most likely to integrate a variety of methods in their research are PhD students. However, there is a lack of courses addressing the combination of different methods and PhD students only rarely have the opportunity to discuss the overall research design of their doctoral theses.


This workshop aims to address the aforementioned deficiencies in several ways. The three main goals of the workshop will be:
 to introduce students to the main debates and examples of mixed methods research in political science
 to provide students with a forum to discuss the methodological approaches and designs of their own PhD projects (an opportunity which departmental seminar series and conferences usually lack)
 to create lasting connections between political scientists at UCL, UoK and their partner institutions, thus providing participants with the opportunity to find partners for future cooperation.

 

New Developments in the Statistical Modelling of Presence / Absence Data

Description:

Many different types of data can be collected on animal populations.  This workshop focusses on the collection and analysis of presence/absence data and outlines the modern statistical developments of occupancy modelling.  

Prerequisites:  This workshop is designed for quantitative ecologists, who will typically have studied statistics modules as undergraduates, will be using and fitting models to data in their research and who would like to further their current understanding.

Postgraduate Workshop: Roman Space and Urbanism

The session will feature a keynote presentation by Professor Eric Poehler (Visiting Professor from the University of Massachusetts)

Global Patterns of Commemoration: A Quantitative Spatial Analysis of Formulae used in Roman Epitaphs
Lynne Bennett (Kent)
Singles and Singleness in Christian Inscriptions from Rome
Thomas Goessens (Kent)
Neglected Crossings: The Role of Bridges in the Movement Economy of Ancient Rome
Catherine Hoggarth (Kent)
Inde caput morbi: Implications of Architecture on Street Noises in Roman Cities
Jeff Veitch (Kent)
Understanding the Status of the Mithras Cult in the Tetrarchic Period: The Sociological Implications of the Size and Spatial Grammar of Mithraea
David Walsh (Kent)

Keynote Paper:  Approaches to Roman Space: Pompeii, Isthmia, and Timgad
Eric Poehler (UMass)

 

Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Description:

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is both as a research approach and a set of techniques. As a research approach, it is geared towards systematic cross-case comparison, a form of synthesis between ‘case-oriented’ and ‘variable-oriented’ approaches, the formalization of statements of necessity and sufficiency, an emphasis on complex causality, the quest for some level of parsimony, and the possibility to formulate ‘modest generalizations’. As a set of techniques, it comprises crisp-set QCA (csQCA), mvQCA (multi-value QCA) and fsQCA (fuzzy-set QCA) and can be used for different purposes, from typology-building to theory testing and theory elaboration. These techniques can be used on a stand-alone basis, or combined with qualitative or quantitative (statistical) techniques.

 

Research Design Workshop: Experimental Methodology in the Social Sciences

Description:

In this seminar we approach the choice and use of the experimental methodology in social sciences. We aim to address a number of questions in meaningful ways.

  • What does the experimental methodology provide our understanding and analyses that other approaches do not? How does it differ from other methodological approaches as a means to elicit evidence, relationships, and even causality?
  • When to experiment?
  • If I wanted to run an experiment, what do I need to do/know? What are the “nuts and bolts” of various types of experimental work in social science research? How do I start to imagine my work through a lens of the experimental approach?
  • How are others using experiments and how can that inform my thinking about experimental work in my field?

Bringing in experts from related social science disciplines, this seminar aims at presenting the basic structure, set up, and applicability of experimental studies in a social science context.

Using Systematic Review Methods in Social Sciences

Description:

This course will take a critical look at what Systematic Review methods are, and how we may make use of them within the social sciences. A key element of the move towards ‘what works’, systematic review methods form an important part of research carried out to inform policies. It has been argued that these are amongst the ‘best’ methods to inform policy due to their characterisation as unbiased methods producing more certain research evidence. During the course participants will gain an understanding of the background and development of the method as well as a view of how we can use it in the social sciences, and the particular methodological problems we may run into when doing so due to the particularities of social sciences.

The workshop will be delivered by: Dr Trude Sundberg.

Visual Anthropology Methods Workshop

Description:

Over an intensive period of two days students will be led through the process of collaborative media production with the aim of producing a short media product that will communicate creatively on an issue of relevance to their research.

The workshop will comprise elements of:

·      participative media production
·      basic techniques of visual research
·      interviewing and sound
·      editing and processing (Premiere Pro or Elements/Photoshop Elements)
·      use of archives
·      photo and video elicitation
·      feedback and collaborative methodologies
·      dissemination and social media

The degree and depth of focus will depend on the expertise and interest of the participants. Participants will be expected to bring research materials (if possible video and photographs) to incorporate within their final media product. Students will work in collaborative teams. Participants are encouraged to bring their own digital video and still cameras, but equipment will be made available for those without their own.

Students should be familiar with basic still camera and video camera functionality and should be able to use a computer. We will be working on iMacs.

 

 

 

 

advancedtraining

 


 

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Last Updated: 27/04/2017