Professor Yvonne Sherwood

Professor of Biblical Cultures and Politics

About

Professor Yvonne Sherwood has degrees in English Literature, Jewish Studies and Religious Studies, and she received her PhD - in which she focussed on the Hebrew Bible - in 1995. 

Having taught for over twenty years at the University of Sheffield, King's College London, Roehampton University, and the University of Glasgow, she moved to the University of Kent in January 2013. 

Yvonne was appointed as the Speakers Lecturer at the University of Oxford in 2015 and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Oslo in 2017. She was a visiting fellow at the Centre for Advanced Studies at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich in Spring 2018. 

Well-known internationally (especially in Europe and North America), Yvonne is the author of four monographs, six edited collections and over seventy articles and book chapters. Her publications include Biblical Blaspheming: Trials of the Sacred for a Secular Age (Cambridge University Press, 2012) which was shortlisted for the American Academy Awards for Excellence Book Prize; The Invention of the Biblical Scholar: A Critical Manifesto (with Stephen D. Moore; Fortress, 2011); Derrida and Religion: Other Testaments (with Kevin Hart; Routledge, 2004); and The Bible and Feminism: Remapping the Field (Oxford University Press, 2017). 

Research interests

Yvonne's research focuses on the politics of migration and the figure of the 'resident alien'; blasphemy; sacrifice (especially the sacrifice of Abraham/Ibrahim); colonial Bibles; and genealogies of religion and the secular. 

She particularly enjoys working with postgraduate students on the MA in Religion taught at the University's Canterbury campus and Paris School of Arts and Culture. 

Yvonne enjoys the intensive one-to-one work of the UK PhD system and has seen fourteen students to successful completion of their PhDs. 

One such student was Dr Norma Stewart, who was awarded her PhD in 2017 for the thesis A Critical Study of the "Settlement Narratives" in Judges 1-5 using insights from Postcolonial Studies, to consider the relevance of these texts for the peoples of Israel/Palestine today, about the biblical conquest narratives in the politics of contemporary Israel/Palestine. At 81, Norma was the oldest student ever to qualify for a doctorate at the University of Kent.

Yvonne welcomes enquiries from prospective students interested in pursuing research in one of her areas of interest.

Teaching

Yvonne teaches a range of subjects at undergraduate level, including political theologies and blasphemy. She also teaches on the MA in Religion, which is taught at Canterbury and in Paris.

Publications

Showing 50 of 59 total publications in the Kent Academic Repository. View all publications.

Article

  • Sherwood, Y. (2017). Grammars of Sacrifice: Futures, Subjunctives, and What Would Have/Could Have Happened on Mount Moriah? Biblical Interpretation [Online] 25:519-554. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P05.
    In A Biblical Text and Its Afterlives, published seventeen years ago (unbelievably), I looked forward to what would become a significant turn back towards the biblical texts’ past futures. In this paper, I look at the density of futurity and modality in these past futures. The sacrifice of Isaac reaches beyond itself into the space of the subjunctive, the optative, the cohortative, poetry and prayer. Drawing on Nietzsche’s and Steiner’s intuition that the uniqueness of the human lies with the grammars of the future and the promise, I revive the memory of lost Christian texts in Greek, Syriac, Coptic and Middle English that show, clearly, that the akedah does not just have a long and obsessive history, but a dense and long history of longing. If ‘every human use of the future tense of the verb “to be” is a negation, however limited, of mortality’ (so Steiner), then the fundamental structure of human grammar is sacrificial. In the modest sacrifices of modality, we give up and, in a sense, negate what is in order to make plural possibilities, myriad lives, more and less substantial. As Abraham offers up one son and gets a heavenful of sons, so modality offers up or qualifies or pluralises what is in order to make new possible lives: those that were, that could have been; and those that might yet live or live again.
  • Blanton, W. and Sherwood, Y. (2013). Shallow Graves: Toward a Philosophical Comedy of Tears Over the Serial Dying of Gods. Derrida Today [Online] 6:78-96. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/drt.2013.0053.
    Recent debates about the legacy (and, sometimes, surpassing) of Derridean philosophy have often oriented themselves around questions of a new austerity in relation to the implicit philosophical functioning of God. Indeed, an increasing philosophical vigilance about the death or nonexistence of God has begun to be presented as a hallmark of recent criticisms of earlier receptions of Derrida and, by way of messianic structures of time, of Derridean politics as well. We argue that the inflating value of atheism in recent texts operates most effectively within a broader forgetfulness of the many modes in which a serial dying of gods constitutes a more fundamental quality of the religio-political archive than the stability or life of these gods. We find, moreover, there to be something comical about a reconfiguration of the ontotheological archive around a tableau of serially dying Gods, this God who cannot stabilize or maintain for long any system of divine life support. Most importantly, we find that our sense of comedy is itself indicative of important shifts within the stylistics of Derridean discussions of auto-immunity and supplement which have yet to be worked through with any real seriousness. In this respect, our reflections pair Bergson's reflections on the universe as a ‘machine for the manufacture of gods’ with Bergson's explorations of comedy as a fundamentally mechanical affair. The serially dying gods of our religious and philosophical traditions are best understood in the same modes as Bergson's comedy, often marked by an automatism of everyday mechanisms of life which outlive their useful functioning.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2013). Francisco de Vitoria’s More Excellent Way: How the Bible of Empire Discovered the Tricks of [the Argument from] Trade. Biblical Interpretation [Online] 21:215-275. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1163/15685152-0018A0004.
    In this paper I explore the invention of a cultural and political version of the Bible that originated in the context of the first Spanish Empire in the so-called New World. Patented (so to speak) by the Spanish theologian Francisco de Vitoria, writing in the late 1530s, this Bible became a model for far more famous (which is to say northern European/English) names such as John Locke, as they attempted to negotiate just ownership of that far more famous segment of the Americas, to the north. This Bible—which I’m calling the Bible of Infinite Hospitality and International Trade—was first designed as a riposte to the so-called Requerimiento: a literal application of Deut. 20.10-15, interpreted as a divine mandate and quasi-legal document to be read aloud by a notary to the ‘Indians’ before taking possession of the New World. (In fact, as I also explore in the paper, the Requerimiento is a Christianisation of Islamic jurisprudence, a curious hybrid of Bible and Qur?an.) Opposing divine mandates or literal applications of the biblical and stressing that Christianity and its Bible represent a local law that is not applicable to the Indians, Vitoria’s Bible makes a great show of making it as difficult as possible for the Spaniards to enter the land. But this only prepares the way for the grand denouement: the revelation of a more excellent way, the way of love and trade.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2013). Comparing the ‘Telegraph Bible’ of the Late British Empire to the Chaotic Bible of the Sixteenth Century Spanish Empire: Beyond the Canaan Mandate into Anxious Parables of the Land. In the Name of God: The Bible in the Colonial Discourse of Empire [Online] 126:4-62. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/9789004259126_003.
    In In the Name of God biblical scholars and historians begin the exciting work of deconstructing British and Spanish imperial usage of the Bible as well as the use of the Bible to counteract imperialism.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2011). The Place of Religion in the Iconography of Democracy and the Politics/Aesthetics of ‘Representation’ (Race/Religion/Sex). The Bible and Critical Theory [Online] 7:1-8. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.2104%2Fbct.v7i2.417.
    Looking (briefly) at a few test cases, this article raises some preliminary questions about crude and aporetical uses of the category ‘religion’ in European law, public policy, and what might be called the cultural aesthetics of the democratic. In particular I explore awkward updates of blasphemy legislation. Symptomatically, these a) pluralise religion to the point where lack of religion, or as the revised German criminal code of 1969 puts it Weltanschauungsvereinigungen (‘World-View Organisations’?) are welcomed under the canopy of protection, provided that they can prove quasi-religious status; and b) rework religion as a category akin to race in legislation against racial and religious ‘hate’. I also briefly probe anti-discrimination legislation in England and Wales, where a so-called ‘philosophical’ belief can qualify as religious belief, worthy of the same protection, if it can be proved that ‘it is a belief and not an opinion or view based on the present state of information available’; it is ‘genuinely held’; it is ‘compatible’ with ‘human dignity’ and ‘human rights’; it is ‘weighty and substantial’ and attains a ‘certain level of cogency, seriousness, cohesion and importance’.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2010). Luderen, der blev væk : fortolkernes problemer med Hoseas' Bog. Bibliana 1.
  • Moore, S. and Sherwood, Y. (2010). Biblical Studies 'after' Theory.Onwards Towards the Past Part Three: Theory in the First and Second Waves. Biblical Interpretation: A Journal of Contemporary Approaches [Online] 18:191-225. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156851510X492454.
    At present, 'high theory', epitomized by poststructuralism, is in a perceived state of decline in literary studies. This three-part article explores the complex ramifications of the 'after theory' debate for biblical studies, a field that, for the most part, still seems to be in a 'before theory' phase. Our intent, however, is not to sell biblical scholars on Theory, finally, before the supply runs out. Our aim, rather, is diagnostic and analytic. We want to look at what has happened, what has failed to happen, and what might yet happen in biblical studies in relation to Theory, and reflect on what these various appropriations, adaptations and missed encounters reveal about the very different disciplinary spaces occupied by biblical studies and literary studies, and the very different disciplinary histories that have brought each of these spaces into being. Contending that Theory's most important contribution is the self-reflexive and metacritical moves it makes possible, our reflection on Theory's reception in biblical studies is intended to defamiliarise the peculiarities of our own disciplinary space. What follows is the final instalment of this three-part article.
  • Moore, S. and Sherwood, Y. (2010). Biblical Studies 'after' Theory. Onwards Towards the Past Part One. After 'after Theory', and Other Apocalyptic Conceits. Biblical Interpretation [Online] 18:1-27. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/092725610X12547454150488.
    At present, 'high theory', epitomized by poststructuralism, is in a perceived state of decline in literary studies. This three-part article explores the complex ramifications of the 'after theory' debate for biblical studies, a field that, for the most part, still seems to be in a 'before theory' phase. Our intent, however, is not to sell biblical scholars on Theory, finally, before the supply runs out. Our aim, rather, is diagnostic and analytic. We want to look at what has happened, what has failed to happen, and what might yet happen in biblical studies in relation to Theory, and reflect on what these various appropriations, adaptations and missed encounters reveal about the very different disciplinary spaces occupied by biblical studies and literary studies, and the very different disciplinary histories that have brought each of these spaces into being. Contending that Theory's most important contribution is the self-reflexive and metacritical moves it makes possible, our reflection on Theory's reception in biblical studies is intended to defamiliarise the peculiarities of our own disciplinary space.
  • Moore, S. and Sherwood, Y. (2010). Biblical Studies 'after' Theory: Onwards Towards the Past Part Two: The Secret Vices of the Biblical God. Biblical Interpretation [Online] 18:87-113. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/092725609X12586198053011.
    At present, 'high theory', epitomized by poststructuralism, is in a perceived state of decline in literary studies. This three-part article explores the complex ramifications of the 'after theory' debate for biblical studies, a field that, for the most part, still seems to be in a 'before theory' phase. Our intent, however, is not to sell biblical scholars on Theory, finally, before the supply runs out. Our aim, rather, is diagnostic and analytic. We want to look at what has happened, what has failed to happen, and what might yet happen in biblical studies in relation to Theory, and reflect on what these various appropriations, adaptations and missed encounters reveal about the very different disciplinary spaces occupied by biblical studies and literary studies, and the very different disciplinary histories that have brought each of these spaces into being. Contending that Theory's most important contribution is the self-reflexive and metacritical moves it makes possible, our reflection on Theory's reception in biblical studies is intended to defamiliarise the peculiarities of our own disciplinary space. What follows is the second instalment of this three-part article.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2008). Abraham in London, Marburg-Istanbul and Israel: Between Theocracy and Democracy, Ancient Text and Modern State. Biblical Interpretation [Online] 16:105-153. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156851507X194251.
    This article examines three occurrences of the sacrifice of Isaac in relatively recent cultural and political histories: the case of Godden versus Hales (England, 1686); Erich Auerbach's 'Odysseus' Scar' in Mimesis (Istanbul [Marburg], 1943-1945); and the use of the akedah as a political figure for the modern Israeli nation state. In these three very different cases the biblical narrative undergoes a theological-political translation and the God who issues the exceptional command to sacrifice becomes a figure for the sovereign and/or the state. Each political translation also calls forth critical responses in which the core question becomes the relationship of divine monarchy/state authority to freedom, or, to put it another way, of democracy or would-be 'democracy' to 'theocracy' and its various modern political correlates. By analysing these translations and responses, this essay explores how the questions as it were forced on us by Genesis 22 are not just religious, though they can be understood through the idioms of the religious. It concludes by asking whether such theological-political translations could be relevant to 'Biblical Studies Proper' as a more expansive discipline looks outwards to questions of religion, politics and ethics.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2008). The God of Abraham and Exceptional States, or The Early Modern Rise of the Whig/Liberal Bible. Journal of the American Academy of Religion [Online] 76:312-343. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfn008.
    At a time when considerable attention is being paid to the exceptional, the state of emergency, and the relationship between sovereignty and law, this article uses a late seventeenth-century appeal to the law-suspending God of Abraham in the lawcourts to probe the Christian and theological roots of the sovereign veto/the dispensing power. It attempts to retrieve deep histories that have been missed because seventeenth-century historians do not generally read Giorgio Agamben, while biblical scholars rarely enter the domains of “secular” history and law. The article also explores some of the crucial watersheds that have been passed on the way to modernity. These mean, among other things, that President Bush cannot say, as James II/VII said in 1686, “as the God of Abraham can dispense with his own law, so I, the King/President am able to dispense with the laws that I have made, for all the laws of the constitution are in the gift of the single person of the President/the King”—which is not to say that modern democracies cannot achieve similar effects by different means. A key transition explored in the article is the gradual replacement of the Absolute Monarchical or Patriarchal Bible with the Whig or Liberal Bible: a Bible of fairly recent invention that is non-exceptional and non-arbitrary and defined by its willingness to devolve absolute power to consensus and law. In looking at changing understandings of the political intentions of the Christian God and Bible, this article attempts to go beyond numerous histories of Bible versions and translations into a new analysis of the changing weight of the Bible in public (political, legal) discourse.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2006). Bush’s Bible as a Liberal Bible (Strange Though That Might Seem). Postscripts: The Journal of Sacred Texts and Contemporary Worlds 2:47-58.
    This essay introduces the four articles collected in this issue of Postscripts as a forum on the theme, “Bush’s Bible.” It also argues that Bush’s Bible can be explained as an example of the “Liberal Bible,” a Bible invented in early modernity, though often misunderstood as expressing the Christian Bible’s original, true nature. The recent history of the Liberal Bible needs to be told and analysed in order to understand the fudged religious–secular compromises of modernity. The very vagueness of Bush’s Bible as a loose repository of principles is a symptom of the paradoxical place of the Bible in modern democratic-(Christian) states.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2004). Binding-Unbinding: Divided Responses of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam to the "Sacrifice" of Abraham's Beloved Son. Journal of the American Academy of Religion [Online] 72:821-861. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfh081.
    Media treatments of religion and violence after 9/11 have tended to polarize into two equal and opposite positions: the view that the attacks represent the “hijack” of the “Abrahamic” religions which, properly understood, are antithetical to violence, and the claim that violence and religion are virtual synonyms—a view epitomized in the British journalist Nick Cohen's “Damn Them All.”1 Both positions share the belief that violence can be expelled to a putative outside: either outside religion or outside progressive secularism as it frees itself from the ties of its religious other, conceived of as an archaic site of submissiveness, passivity, and heteronomy. This study problematizes these easy antitheses through a close reading of tangled, ancient responses to the so-called sacrifice of Abraham's beloved son. The contemporary antitheses seem both inadequate and naïve when compared to paradoxes of binding–unbinding in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Book

  • Sherwood, Y. (2012). Biblical Blaspheming: Trials of the Sacred for a Secular Age. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Sherwood, Y. and Moore, S. (2011). The Invention of the Biblical Scholar: A Critical Manifesto. Minneapolis, USA: Fortress Press.

Book section

  • Sherwood, Y. (2017). The Impossibility of Queering the Mother: New Sightings of the Virgin Mother in the ‘Secular’ State. in: Sherwood, Y. ed. The Bible and Feminism: Remapping the Field. Oxford University Press. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198722618.003.0037.
    In this part autobiographical essay, I explore the social consequences of the rise of the so-called ‘tender years’ doctrine coinciding with the rise in divorce. I argue that this has led to increased gender apartheid around the figures of M-for-Mother and F-for-Father, and a new sanctification of the figure of the holy mother-and-child. I look at the inverse and complementary relations between M-for-Male and F-for Female and M-for-Mother and F-for-Father, and I argue (counterintuitively) that origins, mothers and fathers are queerer in ancient myths and the Bible than they are in contemporary semantics and law. The idea of mothering-as-caring is a recent etymological innovation, hatched in the nineteenth century for very particular reasons, and supported by a distinctly modern infrastructure of ‘home’, ‘child’ and the ‘nuclear family’ (again, very recent creations). Thus this new mother-and-child is and is not like the Virgin Mary, for she relies on modern ideologies that separate the aneconomic ‘home’ from the house (the material/economic infrastructure) and on wealthy economies that create ‘children’ through the emergence of schooling for all. I call for more expansive forms and new mythologies, which are desperately needed. I use strange old biblical texts (Solomon’s judgement; the trial of Abraham) to create unheimlich echoes for the so-called secular state and its strange constructions of the family; and I show how the Ten Commandments continue to influence family law.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2016). The Problem of 'Belief'. in: Carling, A. ed. The Social Equality of Religion or Belief. UK: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 51-67. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137501950_2.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2015). On the Freedom of the Concepts of Religion and Belief. in: Sullivan, W. F. et al. eds. Politics of Religious Freedom. Chicargo University Press, pp. 29-44. Available at: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo19986340.html.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2014). Cutting up “Life”: Sacrifice as a Device for Clarifying — and Tormenting — Fundamental Distinctions Between Human, Animal and Divine. in: Koosed, J. ed. The Bible and Posthumanism. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2014). Prophetic ‘Postcolonialism’: Performing the Disaster of the Spanish Conquest on the Stage of Jeremiah. in: Maier, C. M. ed. Congress Volume Munich 2013. Leiden: Brill, pp. 300-332. Available at: http://www.brill.com/products/book/congress-volume-munich-2013.
    This volume presents the main lectures of the 21st Congress of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) held in Munich, Germany, in August 2013. Seventeen internationally distinguished scholars present their current research on the Hebrew Bible, including the literary history of the Hebrew text, its Greek translation and history of interpretation. Some focus on archeological sources and the reconstruction of ancient Israelite religion while others discuss the formation of the biblical text and its impact for cultural memory. The volume gives readers a representative view of the most recent developments in the study of the Old Testament.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2014). Spectres of Abraham, Shadows of Paul. in: Bielik-Robson, A. and Lipszyc, A. eds. Judaism in Contemporary Thought: Traces and Influence. London: Routledge.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2014). The Hagaramic and the Abrahamic, or Abraham the non-European. in: Mason, E. ed. Reading the Abrahamic Faiths. London: Bloomsbury, pp. 17-46. Available at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/reading-the-abrahamic-faiths-9781472509505/.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2013). ‘Napalm Falling like Prostitutes’: Occidental Apocalypse as Managed Volatility. in: Wieser, V. et al. eds. Abendländische Apokalyptik Kompendium zur Genealogie der Endzeit. Berlin: Oldenbourg Akademieverlag.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2013). The Perverse Commitment to Overcrowding and Doubling in Genesis: Implications for Ethics and Politics. in: Dell, K. J. and Joyce, P. M. eds. Biblical Interpretation and Method Essays in Honour of John Barton. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Blanton, W. and Sherwood, Y. (2013). Bible/Religion/Critique. in: King, R. ed. Theory/Religion/Critique: Classic and Contemporary Approaches. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2013). Biblicisation without Templates, or Accidents of the Biblical in Sixteenth Century Mesoamerica. in: Crouch, C. L. and Stökl, J. eds. In the Name of God: The Bible in the Colonial Discourse of Empire. Leiden: Brill.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2012). Reflections on “Modern” Biblical Studies, or Why Philip Davies is (Just a Little Bit) Like Immanuel Kant. in: Burns, D. and Rogerson, J. W. eds. In Search of Philip R.Davies: Whose Festschrift is it Anyway? London: T&T Clark.
  • Brummitt, M. and Sherwood, Y. (2011). The Fear of Loss Inherent in Writing: Jeremiah 36 as the Tedious Self-Narration of a Highly Self-Conscious Scroll. in: Stulman, L. and Diamond, A. R. P. eds. Jeremiah (Dis)Placed: New Directions in Writing/reading Jeremiah. London and New York: T&T Clark, pp. 47-67.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2010). On the Genesis of the Alliance between the Bible and Rights. in: Coomber, M. J. M. ed. Bible and Justice: Ancient Texts, Modern Challenges. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 1-28.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2010). “Tongue-Lashing” or a Prophetic Aesthetics of Violation: An Analysis of Prophetic Structures that Echo Beyond the Biblical World. in: O'Brien, J. M. and Franke, C. eds. The Aesthetics of Violence in the Prophets. London: T&T Clark.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2010). Scenes of Textual Repentance and Critique/Confession: King David between the Renaissance and the Reformation, the “Secular” and the “Sacred” and Samuel and Psalms. in: Linafelt, T., Camp, C. V. and Beal, T. eds. The Fate of King David: The Past and Present of a Biblical Icon. London: T&T Clark, pp. 32-60.
  • Orr, L. and Sherwood, Y. (2009). Love in/of the Bible: Returning (to) Divine Love in the Book of Hosea. in: Sugirtharajah, R. S. ed. Caught Reading Again: Scholars and Their Books. London: SCM Press, pp. 187-204.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2009). Sacred Tropes: Tanakh, New Testament and Qur’an as Literature and Culture. in: Sabbath, R. S. ed. Sacred Tropes: Tanakh, New Testament, and Qur'an as Literature and Culture. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, pp. 115-142.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2008). Iconoclash and Akedah: Holocaust and Sacrifice in the Art of Samuel Bak. in: Fewell, D. N., Phillips, G. A. and Sherwood, Y. eds. Representing the Irreparable: The Shoah, the Bible, and the Art of Samuel Bak. Boston, MA: Pucker Gallery, pp. 125-150.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2007). Prophetic Literature. in: Hass, A., Jasper, D. and Jay, E. eds. The Oxford Handbook of English Literature and Theology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2006). "Passion-Binding-Passion". in: Burrus, V. and Keller, C. eds. Toward a Theology of Eros: Transfiguring Passion at the Limits of Discipline. New York: Fordham University Press, pp. 169-193.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2005). When Johannes de Silentio sounds like Johanna de Silentio: Strange Harmonies and Discords in the “Attunement” Section of Fear and Trembling. in: Sherwood, Y. and Bird, D. eds. Bodies in Question: Gender, Religion, Text. Aldershot: Ashgate, pp. 3-13.
  • Sherwood, Y., Hunter, A. and Davies, P. (2004). To the Authors of the Bible. in: Davies, P. R. ed. Yours Faithfully: Virtual Letters From The Bible. Equinox Publishing Limited.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2004). Isaac to Abraham. in: Davies, P. R. ed. Yours Faithfully: Virtual Letters From The Bible. London: Equinox Publishing.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2004). Textual Carcasses and Isaac’s Scar, or What Jewish Interpretation Makes of the Violence that Almost Takes Place on Mount Moriah. in: Sherwood, Y. and Bekkenkamp, J. eds. Sanctified Aggression: Legacies of Biblical and Post-Biblical Vocabularies of Violence. London: T&T Clark, pp. 22-43.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2004). Other Testaments. in: Sherwood, Y. and Hart, K. eds. Derrida and Religion: Other Testaments. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, pp. 3-26.
  • Sherwood, Y. and Caputo, J. (2004). Otobiographies, or How a Torn and Disembodied Ear Hears a Promise of Death [A Pre-arranged Meeting between Yvonne Sherwood and John D. Caputo and the Book of Amos and Jacques Derrida]. in: Sherwood, Y. and Hart, K. eds. Derrida and Religion: Other Testaments. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, pp. 209-239.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2004). Derrida’s Bible. in: Sherwood, Y. ed. Derrida's Bible: Reading a Page of Scripture with a Little Help from Derrida. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1-20.
  • Sherwood, Y. (2004). And Sarah Died. in: Sherwood, Y. ed. Derrida's Bible: Reading a Page of Scripture with a Little Help from Derrida. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 261-292.

Edited book

  • Sherwood, Y. (2017). The Bible and Feminism: Remapping the Field. [Online]. Sherwood, Y. ed. Oxford University Press. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198722618.001.0001.
  • Fewell, D.N., Phillips, G.A. and Sherwood, Y. eds. (2008). Representing the Irreparable: The Shoah, the Bible, and the Art of Samuel Bak. Boston, MA: Pucker Gallery.
  • Sherwood, Y. and Bird, D. eds. (2005). Bodies in Question: Gender, Religion, Text. Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • Sherwood, Y. and Bekkenkamp, J. eds. (2004). Sanctified Aggression: Legacies of Biblical and Post-Biblical Vocabularies of Violence. London: T&T Clark.
  • Sherwood, Y. and Hart, K. eds. (2004). Derrida and Religion: Other Testaments. Abingdon and New York: Routledge.

Internet publication

  • Sherwood, Y. (2012). The Politics of Religious Freedom:On the Freedom of the Concepts of Religion and Belief [Digital Blog Forum Article]. Available at: http://blogs.ssrc.org/tif/2012/11/13/on-the-freedom-of-the-concepts-of-religion-and-belief/.
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