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Undergraduate Courses 2017

Hispanic Studies and Film - BA (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

Hispanic Studies and Film enables you to learn the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world, alongside the study of films from all genres, including Spanish-language films. The films of Spain have seen a resurgence in recent years, with major successes including, for example, Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), The Orphanage (2007) and the work of Pedro Almodóvar.

Outside Spain, Spanish is the official language of all countries in South and Central America except Brazil, and is widely spoken in many parts of North America. The programme gives you the opportunity to explore the languages and cultures of Spain and Spanish America while developing your language skills.

You have the opportunity to spend a year abroad in a Spanish-speaking country and we offer advanced language modules focusing on translation and interpreting – valuable skills when looking for employment. Portuguese is also optional for joint honours students. Our facilities include multimedia laboratories, which offer a variety of interactive language learning programmes and dictionaries, and access to audio, video and computer-assisted language learning facilities.

Kent is one of the three major universities in the UK for film studies, and one of the most highly regarded departments in Europe. Film at Kent engages with cinema's rich scope and history, from silent classics and mainstream Hollywood to world cinema and the avant-garde. We have a thriving film culture, with 10-20 films screened on our courses each week, the Gulbenkian Cinema (the University’s arts cinema) based on campus and a lively student film society.

In 2014, the University opened a dedicated 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Hispanic Studies and Film is therefore an ideal combination for those wanting to gain linguistics skills and develop cultural insights that transcend national boundaries.

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2015, 92% of Hispanic Studies students were satisfied with the quality of teaching on their course and in The Complete University Guide 2016, Hispanic Studies was ranked 1st for research quality.

Drama, Dance and Cinematics at Kent was ranked 11th in The Complete University Guide 2016.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

FI313 - Film Style (30 credits)

The course introduces students to the language of film, from aspects of mise-en-scène (setting, performance, costumes, props, lighting, frame composition) to framing (camera movement, shot scale, lenses), sound (fidelity, volume, timbre) and editing (from requirements for spatial orientation through matches on action, eyeline matches and shot-reverse-shot structures to temporal manipulations through ellipsis and montage). The study of these elements enables students to understand the spatial and temporal construction of films, as well as the stylistic, expressive and/or dramatic functions of specific strategies.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS300 - Learning Spanish 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

This module is intended for students who have attained the equivalent of an A-Level pass in Spanish. The main aims of the module are: to consolidate and expand knowledge of the grammar and structure of the language, and to promote a high level of skill in speaking, listening, reading and writing. The course also aims to increase your awareness of the history and culture of Spain through the study of appropriate texts. Regular written work will be required throughout the year.

Native/near-native speakers taking a four-year degree which includes Spanish will normally be exempt from this module. If you think you belong to this category, please choose an alternative module and contact Hispanic Studies as soon as possible at the beginning of term.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS302 - Intensive Learning Spanish 1 (Beginners) (30 credits)

This is an intensive module in Spanish for students who have no or very little knowledge of the language. It is also suitable for those who have taken a GCSE in Spanish, as by the end of the module the level attained will be higher than this (students wishing to proceed with Spanish in their second year will join a Post ‘A’ Level group). The emphasis in this module is on acquiring a sound knowledge of the structure of the language while developing the four main skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing.Please note that this is a very intensive module. If you have little language learning experience, you may find the pace too fast. The module is intended primarily as part of a two-year option for students needing to spend their third year in Spain. Regular written work will be required throughout the year.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS312 - Introduction to Hispanic Culture (15 credits)

This module aims to help you develop an appreciation of the key stages in the development of modern Spanish and Spanish American culture by examining them in their social, political and historical context. At the same time you will be able to improve your analytical powers and communicative skills to enhance your personal development in preparation for Stage Two and your year abroad, if this is part of your programme. You will gain a sound basic knowledge of key figures and events in Spanish and Spanish American history from the Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century, and an understanding of the key factors influencing social and political change during this period. This will allow you to place social, political and artistic events in a historical context, and to make an informed response to, and evaluate critically, a range of texts and topics representative of the main historical and cultural movements in Spain and Spanish America.The key periods covered are:The emergence of the Spanish nation (711 – 1492); The Spanish Golden Age;The emergence of Spanish America (1492 – 1812); 19th Century Spain & the end of the Empire;Spanish America: the way to Independence (1812 – 1898); Spain from 1898 to the Civil War;Spain under Franco (1936 –1975); Spanish America in the XX (1898 – 1975);Transition to a Modern Spain (1975 – 2000); Modern Spanish America (1975 – 2000)

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS313 - Introduction to Hispanic Culture (15 credits)

See entry for LS312

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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FI315 - Film Theory (30 credits)

This module approaches the "big questions" that have surrounded film and the moving image and puts them into historical context. Although specific topics will vary, representative topics may address competing definitions of film and its constitutive elements, the effects that cinema has on spectators, the social, cultural and political implications that moving images reproduce, and the status of the medium between art and entertainment. Students will debate seminal writings on the nature of film and bring their arguments to bear on exemplary film productions.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI316 - Film Histories (30 credits)

This course examines film history and historiography through a series of case studies. In carrying out this investigation students will be invited to work with secondary and primary sources held in the library and will be encouraged to evaluate the aesthetic, technological, economic, social and political histories presented in this module. Students will understand the role and value of the contextual study of film and will be given the opportunity to research and write on selected aspects of film historiography. The choice of case studies will depend upon the expertise of the module convenor and is not restricted to a particular national cinema or period; case studies may include, for instance, the history of film by means of the study of a particular theme and cultural context in the history of film.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

FI537 - Postwar European Cinema (30 credits)

This course investigates some major production and aesthetic trends of postwar European cinema. Students are introduced to a selection of European films as well as to the writings of key Continental filmmakers, theorists and critics.



Topics may include: the subjective realisms of the French New Wave and New German Cinema; cycles and trends in European genres, such as the horror film and the western; the aesthetic claims of Italian Neo-Realism and Dogme '95.



These movements will be examined for their claims to interpret the real world, their relationship to films in other national contexts, and also interrogated for the economic and artistic motivations behind their existence as critical categories.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI594 - Film Authorship (30 credits)

This module will offer students the rare opportunity to examine in detail the work of a single director or a group of directors. It will thus enable students to acquire a more complex understanding of the issues at stake in the production, distribution, and reception of a specific body of film work. The module will also develop students' knowledge and understanding of the questions, theories and controversies, which have informed critical issues and theoretical debates on film authorship. It will thus appeal to students who wish to extend their skills in analysing film form, meaning, and practice in both a conceptual and a historical context. Furthermore, as the module will enable detailed consideration of what 'film directing’ is, as an artistic and cultural practice, in given contexts, it will be a very useful course to combine with the practical study of filmmaking.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI602 - Documentary Cinema (30 credits)

This module addresses a series of documentary films in their historical context and in relation to the different modes of non-fiction filmmaking. Documentary narrative techniques including the use of archival footage, staged reconstructions of past events, and talking-head interviews, are investigated by means of close textual analysis and through a comparative approach to diverse documentary films. This module also explores the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction and, while articulating a definition of documentary film, it studies film forms that present an interplay between the two, such as Mockumentaries and Essay Films.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI603 - Sound and Cinema (30 credits)

Cinema has typically been conceived of as an essentially visual phenomenon – films, it is often said, are essentially moving pictures. Sound has, nevertheless, played an important role from the beginnings of cinema, a fact which has been acknowledged in the detailed historical, theoretical and critical work on film music, and film sound more generally, produced over the last decade. Sound and Cinema will provide an overview of this new field of research, and aim to provide students with a clearer understanding of and greater sensitivity to the soundtrack. The course will begin by setting up an introductory framework for the understanding of sound, which considers the relationship between music and other aspects of film sound (dialogue, voice-over, effects), as well as the nature of the relationship between image and sound. Subsequent sessions will consider the evolution of sound technology and its impact on the aural aesthetics of film; the use of classical and popular music in film scores; the emergence of sound designers, such as Walter Murch and Alan Splet, in contemporary cinema; and the distinctive and innovative use of sound and music by such diverse directors as Wim Wenders, Jean-Luc Godard, David Lynch, and William Raban.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI606 - Avant-Garde and Experimental Cinema (30 credits)

This module examines types of cinematic practice whose principal labels have been 'experimental', ‘avant-garde’, ‘underground’ and ‘independent’ – terms which overlap but which are by no means synonymous. It is concerned with traditions of cinema which have, more or less self-consciously, formulated radically different aesthetics from those of the orthodox feature film, in which narrative is either radically reshaped, or displaced altogether by other concerns. Throughout, the course will juxtapose films deriving from the historical avant-garde movements (like the European avant-garde of the 20s, or the post-war American scene) along with contemporary exponents of related forms of filmmaking. The first part of the course provides a conceptual and historical overview of avant-garde filmmaking in the C20th; subsequent weeks focus on specific topics, for example collage, landscape, experimental narrative, and the interaction between film, video and the new media.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI607 - Storytelling and the Cinema (30 credits)

This module examines different forms of narrative and storytelling in cinema in order to place film narration within the tradition of the 'popular' arts. Understanding a film involves making sense not only of its story, its events and actions, but also of its storytelling, of the way in which we come to learn of these events and actions. This module examines the ways in which the specific means of representation of cinema transform a showing into a telling. It looks at theories of narrative in literature and film in relation to the different forms of narration and storytelling in cinema, focusing on questions of structure, reliability and temporality. The psychological and aesthetic role of narrative may be explored through a range of theories and analyses from within film studies and from other disciplines such as anthropology, literary studies, psychology and philosophy. The course will be taught through a series of case-studies using a wide range of films within American and world cinema.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI618 - Screenwriting: An Introduction (30 credits)

This module offers students an introduction to the terms, ideas and craft, involved in the creation of screenplays. Screenwriting is a unique form of writing with very different concerns from the novel, theatre and radio. Although the screenplay is a vital component of a film's success, it tends to be neglected as a separate art form.



In this module we explore the conventions of dramatic structure, new narrative forms and short film variations. Students are encouraged to think critically about screenplay writing and will have an opportunity to write their own screenplay. A selection of writing exercises have been designed to take them through the writing process; from preparation and initial concept to final draft.



The emphasis here will be on practical knowledge and support as student’s uncover their creative voice. This module does not aim to provide vocational training for students wishing to pursue careers in the feature film or television industries.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI583 - Cinema and National Identity (30 credits)

This course examines the mechanisms and conditions that facilitate and enhance transnational cultural flows. We will study how filmmakers actively franchise, adopt and rework film styles and genres. A genre or style initiated in one country can be quickly adopted in another, with filmmakers tailoring the genre or style to the tastes of local audiences. We will both analyse some of the generic conventions that these films foreground and/or transform and isolate some of the national subtleties that are only discernable to local audiences. As the number of co-productions continues to rise, critics and viewers feel perplexed, and sometimes even amused, in their attempts to discern and identify the nationality of a film. We will critically assess whether any limitations exist embedded in such a co-production strategy, which blurs and obscures the specificities of each nation-state involved. Finally, we will explore whether the changing mediascape – one of transnational, multi-media corporate conglomerate involvement in film production.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS504 - Learning Spanish 3B(Intensive Post A-Level) (30 credits)

This module is intended for students who have attained the equivalent of an 'A' Level pass in Spanish or who have taken LS302 Intensive Learning Spanish 1 (Beginners). The main aims of the module are to consolidate and expand knowledge of the grammar and structure of the language, and to promote a high level of skill in speaking, listening, reading and writing. A secondary aim is to increase awareness of the history and culture of Spain and Spanish America, through the study of appropriate texts. Regular written work will be required throughout the year.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS505 - Learning Spanish 4 (30 credits)

This module is intended for students who have attained a level of proficiency in Spanish equivalent to at least that of first year undergraduates. The main aim is to develop communicative skills with much of the emphasis being placed on speaking and listening but also involving a fair amount of writing. It will focus on the ability to operate in a variety of registers and respond adequately to different styles of discourse. There are four one-hour contact hours each week: two language seminars, one language lab class and one conversation class.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS513 - Spanish Literature: Identity (15 credits)

This module aims to explore the theme of identity in Spain with regard to the personal development of the individual, the assumed social roles of men and women, their sense of relevance within the world which they inhabit, and their reflection and expression through literature. This will entail the study of the cultural evolution of individual and collective identity in 20th Century Spanish society and of its particular manifestations in the Spanish literary context. A selection of texts both by men and by women from all genres will be studied, as will relevant literary criticism.



The readings are in Spanish but the module is taught in English

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS515 - Catalan Culture (15 credits)

This module aims to provide an introduction to Catalonia and to place it in the wider context of Spain. To this purpose students will be exploring different aspects of Catalan life and history, such as the language, the arts and the relationship between Catalonia and the rest of the country. The result of this exploration will be used as the basis for an analysis of the distinctive traits of Catalonia’s own culture. The module will be structured around two main topics: a general introduction to Catalan culture and an analysis of a range of works of art and history which will provide a basis for the understanding of the position of Catalonia within the context of Spain. This module may be of particular interest to students thinking of spending their Year Abroad in Barcelona.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS548 - Contemporary Spanish Cinema (15 credits)

This module will cover aspects of contemporary Spanish history and culture with specific focus on post-1975 filmic production but in the wider context of pre- and post-Franco society, history and politics. Students will become familiar with important issues such as national stereotypes, gender and sexuality, social transformations, as well as relevant concepts in Film Studies such as cinematic genre, spectatorship, and representation. While the module will focus to some extent on the individual voice of each of the directors, it will to analyze how their work represents major currents of development in Spanish cinema, both in relation to form and content.



This module is taught in English

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS568 - Second Year Extended Essay (15 credits)

Stage 2 students write an Extended Essay of 4,000-5,000 words on a topic of their own choice. The topic must be on a Hispanic (Peninsular or Latin American) literary, linguistic or cultural subject; it is expected that the topic will be related to other Hispanic Studies modules taken by the student. Throughout the terms students are given guidance by a chosen supervisor. The supervisor and the student will establish a calendar of meetings / supervisions in Week 1 (at least 5 one-hour meetings) in which aims and objectives, critical approach, bibliography and drafts of the Extended Essay will be discussed.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS571 - After Dictatorship: Spain and Latin America (15 credits)

This module explores the different ways in which Spain and Latin American countries have attempted to make transitions from dictatorship to democracy. The course provides an overview of the political, social and cultural developments in Spain and Latin America after conditions of dictatorship, from 1975 onwards in the case of Spain and from the 1980s and 1990s in the case of specific Latin American countries (Chile, Argentina and Peru, among others). The course takes a comparative and interdisciplinary approach by combining history, literature, film, journalism and comics. The chosen texts provide an insight into the political, social and cultural attitudes of post-dictatorship societies as well as into the changing role and conditions of cultural production in post-dictatorial democracies. Issues such as historical trauma and historical memory, forgetting and collective memory, and justice and truth commissions cut across the module.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS579 - Barcelona and Havana: Icon, Myth and History (15 credits)

This module focuses on the cultural history of Barcelona and Havana the iconic capitals of Catalonia and Cuba. Many of the key events and movements of the past century are intimately linked to these two cities, from the collapse of the Spanish Empire and the birth of the new the Latin-American republics, the emergence of nationalism, the development of alternative modes of self-government and their engagement with modernity. Changes and continuities in the political, social and physical topography of Barcelona and Havana will be traced by studying representations of both cities in a range of texts and films from the mid twentieth to the early twenty-first century. Alongside feature films and prose genres such as short stories and reportage, the module will also consider theoretical texts on the city and the contribution of urban life to modern Hispanic culture. Central themes are the interplay of the individual and the collective, urban anonymity and liberation versus alienation and uniformity, multiculturalism and migration.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS562 - The Legacy of Inequality: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (15 credits)

This module will prove an examination of the incorporation of indigenous and slave populations to political life in different Latin American countries from the colonial period to the present. It will focus on two main issues: the relationship between the state and indigenous populations; and the process of abolition of slavery. These topics will be explored in a comparative perspective with an aim to understanding the legacies of unequal societies and their impact on current realities.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Year abroad

The University of Kent has Erasmus agreements with several universities in Spain and Latin America. See Study Abroad A - Z courses and countries.

Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

LS506 - Learning Spanish 5 (30 credits)

This is a final year language module based on translation and interpreting from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish. The aims of the module are to enhance knowledge and awareness of some of the subtleties of the Spanish language by a close study of a range of texts from different sources while developing new oral and aural skills by means of on-the-spot translation and interpreting.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI584 - The Gothic in Film (30 credits)

This module will investigate "the Gothic" as a significant and recurring cycle within Hollywood film with recognisable tropes and themes, and a dominant tone and style. Beginning with the 1940s cycle of “Women's Gothic” which emerged at the same time as Film Noir, and visually and thematically overlapped with it, the module will explore the particularly filmic ways that such texts manage to evoke the menacing atmosphere and the tone of sexualised danger and suspense achieved by the Gothic’s source novels and short stories. Continuing from the original cycle of films, the module will examine later Hollywood films that have employed the themes and imagery of the Gothic to tap into similar complex anxieties and desires, before inspecting films from other cinemas (for example, those of Europe or Asia) which also make use of the dominant Gothic tropes.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI585 - Film Criticism (30 credits)

This course introduces students to the history and theory of film criticism, emphasising the coexistence of different approaches to the analysis, evaluation and appreciation of film. The module will also have a practical aspect, offering students the opportunity to write critical pieces on the films screened for the class. In addition to traditional lectures and seminars, some sessions will be devoted to writing and to analysing fellow students' work. Participants will also be encouraged to reflect critically on different media of film criticism (newspapers, magazines, academic journals, the internet, television) and on the current state of film criticism.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI622 - Television Series: Narration, Engagement and Evaluation (30 credits)

The module explores storytelling in fictional television series, and how the long duration of these series changes the spectator's engagement, as compared to engagement in the relatively short fiction film. Furthermore, this module focuses on case studies in order to investigate their narrative, stylistic and thematic characteristics, their specific genre conventions and their background in television history. Case studies may include The Sopranos, The Wire, Breaking Bad and Madmen in an inquiry into the narrative as well as moral complexity of this recent, so-called quality trend of American drama television series, and the emerging genre convention of the antihero. The module also addresses how various types of television series have been valued in critical reception through the history of television. For example, in relation to the case studies mentioned above, the module may examine critically the implications of the oft-used label 'Quality TV’ and the HBO slogan ‘It’s not TV, it’s HBO’. In addition to introducing the students to current developments in television studies, this module takes a film theoretical, narratological approach to current television series, and trains students in various approaches to the study of television series in and beyond television studies proper.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI624 - Beyond Cinema (30 credits)

From the intimate viewing experience offered by mobile phones to the social interaction required by sing-a-long screenings, this module considers the changing nature of where, when and how audiences engage with film and the moving image. It considers the history of cinema-going, paying attention to the old and new sites of exhibition, especially those facilitated by new technologies. Connectedly, the module analyses the different modes of spectatorship, including audience participation and the desire to prolong or enhance the cinematic experience via extra-filmic activities, such as film-tourism. It also considers film's interaction with other arts and media—for example, its use within theatrical performances and its relationship with television. In doing so, this module reflects upon and reconsiders the definitions and limits of cinema and addresses the implications this has for the academic discipline 'Film Studies'.



As part of this course, students will have the opportunity to attend special screenings, participate in field trips and/or watch films unsupervised.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI569 - Digital Domains (30 credits)

The module primarily focuses on contemporary digital filmmaking practices and film viewing. The first section of the module introduces trick cinema, special effects, the digital intermediate, and a range of computer generated images to explore the different opportunities these offer for manipulating space, constructing narratives and aesthetic innovation. The second section of the module more explicitly engages with a range of theoretical frameworks in order to think about how digital technologies alter our understanding of film, its relationships with other media, and the ways in which we participate in film culture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI573 - Animated Worlds (30 credits)

Animation is a term covering a diverse range of forms, and this module introduces cel-

animation, stop-motion puppetry, abstract animation, as well as computer-generated cartoons and features (including animated documentaries) to explore the animated form. The first section of the module introduces different styles through a study of Disney and Warner Bros cartoons, the stop-motion animations of the Quay Bros, TV Anime, abstract music animation and web-based animation. The second section of the module uses a range of critical approaches to explore contemporary feature length animations from different national contexts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI582 - New York and the Movies (30 credits)

This module examines the way New York has been used as a site for filmmaking, looking at the history of the production of films in and about the city, and as a vital centre of film culture -- not just of filmmaking, but also exhibition and film criticism. The module considers questions of modernity, the avant-garde practice in New York during the 1950s and 60s, and the city's representation in mainstream Hollywood productions. The work on New York and film will be contextualised within a cultural history of the city, with a dual emphasis on narratives of immigration and the city as the post-war centre of the world art market.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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ART500 - Independent Project (30 credits)

Students who wish to take the module must approach a permanent academic member of staff with a proposal, typically in advance of module registration, during the Spring term of the previous year. Students pick a research topic of their choice; however, students are only allowed to register for the module with the permission of a staff member who has agreed to supervise the project, and who has the expertise to do so. Potential supervisors must also ensure before they agree to supervise a project that the resources required to complete the project will be available to the student, and that adequate supervisory support will be available to the student throughout their study on the module.



Students will be supported in the preparation and submission of their work by their supervisor, although a central expectation of the module is that students will take increasing responsibility for their learning, consistent with expectations of H-level study.



On application, students may take this 30 Credit Year Long module. Admission is subject to approval of a project proposal. Proposals must be submitted to the Module Convenor, Prof. Nicola Shaughnessy (N.Shaughnessy@kent.ac.uk) by 10/04/2016. Within your proposal you must state a preferred supervisor. The proposal form can be downloaded from the School of Arts website, see http://www.kent.ac.uk/arts/current-students/undergraduates.html and click on module availability. Alternatively you can request a copy at Jarman Reception. The Module Convenor will contact you in the summer term to confirm whether your proposal has been accepted. Students wanting to change into ART500 at a later stage may do so but should contact the Module Convenor and submit a proposal at the earliest opportunity. Proposals will not be accepted after 19 June 2016. For more information please speak to the Module Convenor at the School Fair.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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ART501 - Arts Internship (30 credits)

The student(s) engage in a work-based situation of their choice [the student will be responsible finding the work-based situation though support from the School and CES will be available] which bears relevance to their subject of study or a career they expect to pursue upon graduation. The total of 300 hours will be divided as required for purposes of preparation, attendance of work placement and reflection/completion of required assessment.

Issues covered by the course include:

• Work based systems: Nature of organisation; organisational structure; type of work, work practices and procedures, induction, health & safety, training, quality assurance; communication channels and systems

• Performance of professional activity: identification of professional activities, selecting formulating schedule and action plan, perform activities, health & safety, training requirements, support and supervision.

• Potential Improvements: new technology and new/changed work practices or system. Suggestions and evaluation of effects

• Portfolio: methods of gathering, analysing and recording evidence, types of evidence, witness statements, diaries, internal and external correspondence, observed performance; referencing systems; presentation written and verbal

• Self-Presentation: methods of ensuring an effective presentation of personal research, relevant professional skills, communication skills, confidence etc.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS580 - Barcelona and Havana: Icon, Myth and History (15 credits)

This module focuses on the cultural history of Barcelona and Havana the iconic capitals of Catalonia and Cuba. Many of the key events and movements of the past century are intimately linked to these two cities, from the collapse of the Spanish Empire and the birth of the new the Latin-American republics, the emergence of nationalism, the development of alternative modes of self-government and their engagement with modernity. Changes and continuities in the political, social and physical topography of Barcelona and Havana will be traced by studying representations of both cities in a range of texts and films from the mid twentieth to the early twenty-first century. Alongside feature films and prose genres such as short stories and reportage, the module will also consider theoretical texts on the city and the contribution of urban life to modern Hispanic culture. Central themes are the interplay of the individual and the collective, urban anonymity and liberation versus alienation and uniformity, multiculturalism and migration.



Subject to change pending faculty approval

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SCL502 - Languages in the Classroom (30 credits)

The student will spend one half-day per week for ten weeks in a school. Students will work in a school, with a nominated teacher, for ten half days during the Spring Term and will have the opportunity to promote their subject in a variety of ways. The Course Convenor will place students in appropriate schools, either primary or secondary. They will observe sessions taught by their designated teacher and possibly other teachers. They will act to some extent in the role of a teaching assistant, by helping individual pupils who are having difficulties or by working with small groups. They may take 'hotspots': brief sessions with the whole class where they explain a language topic or talk about aspects of University life. They must keep a weekly journal reflecting on their activities at their designated school. The university sessions and weekly school work will complement each other. Therefore, attendance to university sessions is crucial as it will also give the students the opportunity to discuss aspects related to their weekly placement and receive guidance.



Some travel may be required by students taking this module. In this instance, it should be noted that the University is unable to cover the cost of any such journey.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS550 - Reading Monstrosity in Iberian Culture (15 credits)

This module will take a close look at the figure of the “monster” in Iberian culture, ranging from medieval considerations of the monster in bestiaries to eighteenth-century medical treatises on monstrous forms to twentieth-century depictions of monsters. We will focus on the historical context out of which a particular meaning of the monster emerges. In order to do so, the course will draw upon high and popular culture, a variety of disciplines, and a variety of media (literature, prints, paintings, films). Discussions will be supplemented with relevant historical, critical or theoretical readings. The monster in this course will be an interpretative model for an understanding of how notions such as ‘normalcy’, ‘beauty’, ‘the classical body’ are constructed and will enable us to look at issues of otherness, gender, and race.



This module is taught in English

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS554 - Writing the Cuban Revolution (15 credits)

The module investigates a variety of films and texts produced by Cubans both in Cuba and in exile from the time of the Revolution to the present day. In analysing these texts, an impression will emerge of how different writers and artists respond to the powerful presence of the revolutionary regime and to the pressures inherent within that system. Textual analysis will run parallel to an investigation of the history and politics of the revolutionary period, highlighting key moments and issues that become decisive elements within the texts.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS563 - Terrorism and State Terror in Latin America (15 credits)

This module explores the difficult experiences of terrorism and state terror in Latin America though films and documentaries. Between 1970s and 1990s Argentina, Chile, Central America and Peru lived through extreme instances of insurgency and state sponsored violence. The course will examine the tensions in society brought by these experiences as well as the efforts to come to terms with these memories. The reports produced by the various commissions that sought truth and redress from the 1980s to the present will be the main tests to accompany the course.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LS567 - Final Year Dissertation (30 credits)

Final year students write a dissertation of 9,000-10,000 words on a topic of their own choice. The topic must be on a Hispanic (Peninsular or Latin American) literary, linguistic or cultural subject; it is expected that the topic will be related to other Hispanic Studies modules taken by the student. Throughout the two terms students are given guidance by a chosen supervisor. The supervisor and the student will establish a calendar of meetings / supervisions in Week 1 (at least 8 one-hour meetings) in which aims and objectives, critical approach, bibliography and drafts of the dissertation will be discussed.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage

Teaching & Assessment

Film

All modules involve lectures, small group seminars and film screenings (where relevant). On average, you have two lectures and three hours of seminars each week, plus four to six hours film viewing.

Depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework.

Hispanic Studies

All Spanish language modules involve three hours teaching each week, with the exception of the beginners' language modules at Stages 1 and 2 which involve four hours. They include small group seminars, conversation classes run by a native speaker, short lectures in Spanish, work in a language laboratory and work on computer-assisted language learning materials. The culture and literature modules normally involve a one-hour lecture and a one-hour seminar each week.

Stage 1 is assessed by 100% coursework (essays, class participation) in some modules, and a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination in others. Stage 2/3: depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays), to a combination of examination and coursework, in the ratio 60:40 or 80:20.

Programme aims

For programme aims and learning outcomes please see the programmes specification for each subject below. Please note that outcomes will depend on your specific module selection:

Careers

Film

Studying Film, you learn to think critically and to work independently; your communication skills improve and you learn to express your opinions passionately and persuasively, both in writing and orally. These key transferable skills are essential for graduates as they move into the employment market.

Recent graduates have gone on to careers in film-making, film and television industries, arts organisations, university and school teaching, local government and business, or to pursue postgraduate academic and practical film courses. In the last few years, students have gone on to take up positions such as film journalists, film/TV archivists and roles in marketing and distribution.

Hispanic Studies

Modern Languages at Kent are doing a number of things to improve student employability, such as work-related modules and work placements. Both of these are a key part of the Languages in the Classroom module, designed for budding language teachers, which combines traditional learning methods with practical teaching experience.

There are numerous employment prospects open to Languages graduates, and popular choices include teaching Spanish, or teaching English as a foreign language; translation and interpreting, working in international organisations and going into the Armed Forces.  Further study options often include a PGCE, TEFL, a PhD or Master's in various aspects of Hispanic language and culture, or another subject altogether.

Recent graduates have gone into teaching, translating and interpreting, marketing, journalism, publishing, and other areas. Many language graduates begin their career abroad.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

BBB

GCSE

Grade B in a modern European language other than English

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 15 at HL, including 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

University funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised but will be updated on our funding page in due course.

Government funding

You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

The Government has confirmed that EU students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year will still have access to student funding support for the duration of their course.

Scholarships

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages.

The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £13810

Fees for Year Abroad/Industry

As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. 

Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

UK/EU fee paying students

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

In accordance with changes announced by the UK Government, we are increasing our 2017/18 regulated full-time tuition fees for new and returning UK/EU fee paying undergraduates from £9,000 to £9,250. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise from £4,500 to £4,625. This was subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. This fee will ensure the continued provision of high-quality education.

For students continuing on this programme, fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

Publishing Office - © University of Kent

The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000

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