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Undergraduate Courses 2017

History and Computing - BA (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

This unique course combines two distinct subjects from two distinct disciplines: the study of History - firmly rooted in the humanities - and the study of Computer Science - firmly rooted in mathematics and the sciences.

Studying History, you gain a rich understanding of the past (alongside skills of analysis, criticism and communication) while studying Computing gives you a firm and practical foundation in programming and software development, computer systems and networking.

Both subjects follow a modular structure allowing students to tailor their studies to their own interests.

Independent rankings

History at Kent was ranked 19th in The Guardian University Guide 2017. In the National Student Survey 2016, 94% of our History students were satisfied with the overall quality of their course. 

History at Kent was ranked 16th for graduate prospects in The Guardian University Guide 2017 and 17th for graduate prospects in The Complete University Guide 2017. Of History students who graduated in 2015, 92% were in work or further study within six months (DLHE).

Computer Science at Kent was ranked 12th for graduate prospects in The Complete University Guide 2017 and in The Times Good University Guide 2016.

Of Computer Science students at Kent who graduated in 2015, 92% were in work or further study within six months (DLHE). Of those who went into employment, 95% found professional jobs. 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

CO520 - Further Object-Oriented Programming (15 credits)

This module builds on the foundation of object-oriented design and implementation found in module CO320 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming to provide a deeper understanding of and facility with object-oriented program design and implementation. More advanced features of object-orientation, such as inheritance, abstract classes, nested classes, graphical-user interfaces (GUIs), exceptions, input-output are covered. These allow an application-level view of design and implementation to be explored. Throughout the module the quality of application design and the need for a professional approach to software development is emphasized.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO320 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to object-oriented software development. Software pervades many aspects of most professional fields and sciences, and an understanding of the development of software applications is useful as a basis for many disciplines. This module covers the development of simple software systems. Students will gain an understanding of the software development process, and learn to design and implement applications in a popular object-oriented programming language. Fundamentals of classes and objects are introduced, and key features of class descriptions: constructors, methods and fields. Method implementation through assignment, selection control structures, iterative control structures and other statements is introduced. Collection objects are also covered and the availability of library classes as building blocks. Throughout the course, the quality of class design and the need for a professional approach to software development is emphasized

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO323 - Databases and the Web (15 credits)

• An introduction to databases and SQL, focussing on their use as a source for content for websites.

• Creating static content for websites using HTML(5) and controlling their appearance using CSS.

• Using PHP to integrate static and dynamic content for web sites.

• Securing dynamic websites.

• Using Javascript to improve interactivity and maintainability in web content.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO324 - Computer Systems (15 credits)

14. A synopsis of the curriculum

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental behaviour and components (hardware and software) of a typical computer system, and how they collaborate to manage resources and provide services. The module has two strands: ‘Hardware Architecture’ and ‘Operating Systems and Networks,’ which form around 35% and 65% of the material respectively. Both strands contain material which is of general interest to computer users; quite apart from their academic value, they will be useful to anyone using any modern computer system.

Hardware Architecture

Data representation: Bits, bytes and words. Numeric and non-numeric data. Number representation.

Computer architecture: Fundamental building blocks (logic gates, flip-flops, counters, registers). The fetch/execute cycle. Instruction sets and types.

Data storage: Memory hierarchies and associated technologies. Physical and virtual memory.

Operating Systems and Networks

Operating systems principles. Abstractions. Processes and resources. Security. Application Program Interfaces.

Device interfaces: Handshaking, buffering, programmed and interrupt-driven i/o. Direct Memory Access.

File Systems: Physical structure. File and directory organisation, structure and contents. Naming hierarchies and access. Backup.

Background and history of networking and the Internet.

Networks and protocols: LANs and WANs, layered protocol design. The TCP/IP protocol stack; theory and practice. Connection-oriented and connectionless communication. Unicast, multicast and broadcast. Naming and addressing. Application protocols; worked examples: SMTP, HTTP).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI426 - Making History: Theory and Practice (30 credits)

This module has two aims:



1) to contribute towards equipping the students with the necessary practical and intellectual skills for them to think and write as historians at an undergraduate level;



2) to encourage them to think reflectively and critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its epistemological claims, and why we, as historians, do what we do in the way we do it. This will be achieved through four blocks of seminars and lectures.



These will cover:

• The practice of history, introducing history at university level at both a practical and conceptual level.

• Historical methodology. This will cover the development of university history in the nineteenth century and how this differed from the study and writing of history that had gone before. It will also consider the impact of the Social Sciences on the historical profession during the twentieth century.

• The varieties of history. This will examine some of the major themes and approaches, such as Marxism or nationalism, in modern historical scholarship.

• Beyond history. The final block will consider the ‘linguistic turn’ and new ways of studying and writing history in the twenty-first century.



A fifth component, concentrated in the first three or four weeks of the module, will provide training in core, practical skills (library and bibliographic skills, IT skills and the use of MyFolio and PDP).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI346 - Monarchy and Aristocracy in England 1460-1640 (15 credits)

Subjects to be covered include:



The Wars of the Roses

Richard III

Henry VII and the Nobility

Henry VII and the Nobility

Henry VIII, Faction and Court

Tudor Rebellions

Aristocratic Power and mid-Tudor Rebellions

Mary I and Elizabeth I: the Image and Practice of Female Monarchy

Late Tudor and Early Stuart Aristocratic Culture

Crisis of the Aristocracy?

Perspectives on Monarchy and Aristocracy

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI353 - Britain and the Second World War: The Home Front (15 credits)

War has often been seen as a catalyst for change. This module will examine how far this was true of politics, society, culture and the economy in Britain in the Second World War. The module will draw on a wide range of primary sources: Parliamentary debates, contemporary writings, including those of George Orwell and J B Priestley, cartoons, diaries, and personal memoirs. In order to increase familiarity with primary sources students will complete a compulsory document question as part of their Coursework. By the end of the module students should be able to discuss with authority the varying interpretations of the impact of the war. They will also have experienced the different approaches of political, social, cultural and economic historians, and this should provide a basis for choice of modules in Stage 2.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI359 - Empire and Africa (15 credits)

This module is especially concerned with the end of Empire in Africa. After exploring the origins and nature of European empires in Africa, the course examines the impact of World War II on the British Empire and the end of British imperial influence in Kenya and Egypt. The course compares the British approach to decolonisation with those of the French, Belgians and Portuguese, raising the cases of French Algeria, the Belgian Congo, and Portuguese Angola and Mozambique. American attitudes to empire are also considered. Finally, the module covers the history of Italian and Soviet involvement in the Horn of Africa.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI366 - Britain in the Age of Industrialisation 1700-1830 (15 credits)

This module aims to provide students with an historical analysis of the classic phase of British industrialisation, traditionally known as the ‘Industrial Revolution’. Historians nowadays emphasise the gradual nature of industrial transformation in Britain, and the period considered here is sufficiently long to encompass several key issues in economic history: the transformation of the rural sector, the role of international trade in development, the origins and dynamics of industrial growth and innovation, the rise of a consumer society, the process of urbanisation, and the social costs of industrialisation. The module will provide a grounding in historical concepts appropriate to the social sciences, and students will acquire a familiarity with historical statistics.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI385 - Introduction to the History of Medicine (15 credits)

The module introduces students to a broad range of material and themes relevant to the history of medicine, highlighting changes and continuities in medical practice and theory as well as in medical institutions and professional conduct. The section on ancient medicine addresses the role of Greek writers such as Hippocrates and the Roman medical tradition as represented in the texts of Galen. The section on medieval medicine focuses on major epidemics, the origins of medical institutions, and the role of medical care and cure in the context of social and demographic changes. In particular, this section addresses the role of the Black Death and subsequent plagues, as well as the history of hospitals. The section on medicine and the natural world discusses the source of medical knowledge as derived from the natural world through diverse cultural, social and scientific practices. The section on health and climate highlights the historical links between disease, climate and environment, for example the emergence of theories of miasma, putrefaction and the ideas of “unhealthy climates”. The section on medicine and empire introduces the historical links between medicine and imperialism from the eighteenth century onwards. The section on early modern and modern medicine explores the development of psychiatry and the asylum system in the 18th century, the rise of the welfare state and new theories of biology and disease transmission in the 19th century. These will be linked to the development of medical ethics.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI391 - The Rise of the United States Since 1880 (15 credits)

The module will introduce the students to the history of the U.S during its dramatic rise to industrial and international power. Beginning with the transformation of the U.S into an urban industrial civilisation at the end of the 19th Century, it ends with a review of the American position at the beginning of the 21st century. Themes include early 20th century reform, the rise to world power by 1918, prosperity and the Depression, the New Deal, war and Cold War, race relations, Vietnam, supposed decline and resurgence from Nixon to Reagan, the end of the Cold War, the Clinton Administration.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI411 - Later Medieval Europe (15 credits)

This module is a survey of medieval Europe from c. 1000 to c. 1450. It includes elements of political, institutional, religious, social and cultural history. The module is intended to provide students with a foundation that will allow them to make the most of other courses in European history, particularly those focusing on the Middle Ages and Early Modern period, by equipping them with a grounding in geography and chronology, as well as in a variety of approaches to the study of history. Lectures will provide an overview of some of the period’s defining features including the feudal system; kingship; the crusades, warfare and chivalry; popes (and anti-popes); monasticism and the coming of the friars; heresy; visual culture; women and the family; and towns and trade. Two-hour fortnightly seminars will introduce students to the reading and understanding of primary sources on relevant topics.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI430 - Modern British History (Part Two) (15 credits)

The course will provide a survey of the major events, themes and historiographical debates in modern British history from the early twentieth century to the 1990s. It will examine the roles of total war, imperialism and decolonisation, social welfare legislation, the advent of mass culture in shaping the nation. Subjects to be covered will include: crisis and reform in Edwardian Britain; politics and society in the Great War; stagnation and recovery in the interwar years; appeasement; the People’s War, 1939-45; the welfare state; decolonisation; the affluent society and the politics of consensus; the end of consensus 1970-79; nationalism and devolution; Thatcher and the rolling back of the state; New Labour.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI433 - 1600-1750: The Age of Enlightenment (15 credits)

This module will provide a survey of the major events, themes and historiographical debates in early modern history from the religious wars of the first half of the seventeenth century to the dawn of modernity in the second half of the eighteenth century. This period in European history witnessed the development of a system of nation states in Europe, the rise of Absolutism, the development of new European powers in Eastern and Central Europe, an expansion of European influence in the Americas and Asia (leading to a greater commercialisation of European society), as well as the fundamental shifts in European intellectual culture associated with the Scientific Revolution, overseas expansion and the Enlightenment. As with the complementary module on earlier European history (c.1450-1600) the lectures and seminars will be arranged around six key areas: 1) religion 2) intellectual and scholarly life 3) economy 4) society 5) politics and war and 6) culture. These themes will be approached through the examination of national histories, specific events, and historiographical controversies. The topics covered will reflect the research and teaching interests of the School of History’s early modernists and prepare students for early modern modules taken at I and H level. Students will be encouraged to take this module along with a similar module in the Autumn term which will cover the period from c.1450 to c.1600.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI436 - A Global History of Empires: 1850-1960 (15 credits)

This course explores the history of empires on a global scale. It challenges students to grasp the history of empires by examining their structures, instruments and consequences. The course will cover the expansion of European empires from the end of the nineteenth to the middle of the twentieth century, in the age of decolonization. Topics include the conquest of Africa in the age of the so-called ‘New Imperialism’, the French and British Civilizing missions in Africa and Asia, the emergence of modern ideas of race, immigration, freedom struggles in Asia and Africa, and postcolonial cultural and political developments across the world. It will provide students with a critical historical knowledge of imperialism and globalisation and enable them to form a deep understanding of the postcolonial world.

Although this module is distinct from the other module on the history of global empires, (1600-1850) which will run in the Autumn term, for the deep interconnectedness of this history, which this module/s highlights, students will be encouraged to take both.



Topics will cover:

1. The Victorian Empire: Law, Education and Modernity

2. Empire on the Move: Missionaries, Indentured labour and Convicts

3. The 'Scramble for Africa'

4. The Nature of the British African Empire: from the ‘civilising mission’ to Indirect Rule)

5. French, Belgian and Portuguese Colonialisms

6. Empire and Race: Ideas of Difference and Degeneration

7. Freedom from Empire: Nationalist and anti-imperialist movements in South Asia, North Africa

8. WWII and the 'Second Colonial Occupation'

9. Decolonization in Africa

10. Neo-imperial Adventures? The USSR and China in Africa

11. The Legacy of Empire: the Commonwealth, Immigration and Multiculturalism

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI437 - War and Diplomacy in Europe c1850-2000 (15 credits)

Subjects to be covered will include: The Crimean War; The Franco-Prussian War and German unification; the origins of the First World War; the Treaty of Versailles; the League of Nations; the origins of the Second World War; the Cold War in Europe; the origins of the European Union; from détente in Europe to the fall of Communism.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI439 - Sport in Modern Britain: A Cultural and Social History (15 credits)

This module explores the emergence of contemporary forms of sport through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The shifting forms and functions of sport will be studied and these will be related to changes to broader social and cultural transformations in British society. The tension that existed for much of this period between the amateur and the professional will be investigated as will the growing commercialisation of the sports industry. Students will learn about the diversity of sporting traditions across British history and examine how they were shaped by wider forces such as work, class and gender. To this end, the focus will fall not only on what are perceived to be the national winter and summer games of football and cricket but also on a range of other sports, such as rugby, netball, boxing, tennis, rowing and athletics.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI440 - Politics and Culture of Nineteenth Century Russia (15 credits)

The module is designed to be a wide-ranging introduction to 19th century Russia. The political history of Russia will be covered through a focus on individual tsars, with an emphasis on their approach to reform. Seminars will be devoted to Alexander I, Nicholas I and Alexander II in particular. Russia's involvement in war, and its impact on domestic life, will be another area of focus, with the Napoleonic War and the Crimean War receiving particular coverage. A seminar will be devoted to the birth of the Russian intelligentsia and the early growth of the revolutionary movement. Cultural traditions will be explored through examination of Russia's literary tradition. Social history will be explored through a focus on the changing status of the peasantry, with particular reference to the Emancipation of the Serfs in 1861. In addition, students will be introduced to the multi-ethnic reality of Russian life. Another theme will be Russian religion and spirituality. This broad approach to Russia will be helpful to students who wish to pursue Russian history at stages 2 and 3, but will also be of comparative interest to students who do not continue with Russian history.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

CO510 - Software Engineering (30 credits)

13. A synopsis of the curriculum Phase 1 – theory and tools:

• Introduction to basic design principles of systems;

• Software process - concepts & implementation:

o life cycle models (from Extreme Programming to CMM);

o definition, model, measurement, analysis, improvement of software and team (organization) process;

• Requirements elicitation, analysis and specification;

• Introduction to modelling principles (decomposition, abstraction, generalization, projection/views), and types of models (information, behavioural, structural, domain, and functional);

• Basic UML: uses cases, classes, sequence and collaboration diagrams;

• Risk & risk management in software:

o risk management: identification, analysis and prioritization

o software risks: project, process and product

o development methods for reducing risk

• Training in handling electrical components commonly encountered in computing systems and safe working practices.

• Software management: project estimation and metrics, software and process quality assurance, documentation and revision control;

• Introduction to project management;

• Software engineering tools: configuration control (e.g. SVN, GIT, etc.), project management (e.g Trac), integrated development environments (e.g. Eclipse, NetBeans, etc.), and a UML tool (e.g. IBM Rational Rose).



Phase 2 – Practice and techniques:

• Introduction to design patterns;

• More UML: state, activity diagrams, and OCL;

• Project management practice;

• Introduction to software testing: unit testing, coverage analysis, black box testing, integration testing, test cases based use cases, system and acceptance testing, and testing tools;

• Understanding of a number of business techniques including estimation of time, costs and evaluation of technical alternatives in the business context;

• Professional practice (reflective):

o codes of ethics and professional conduct;

o social, legal, historical, and professional issues and concerns;

• Design and implement a simple software system to meet a specified business goal.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5013 - Popular Religion and Heresy, 1100-1300 (30 credits)

This module examines the rise and spread of popular religious movements in Western Europe from the eleventh to the early fourteenth century and considers how some of these movements became seen as heresy and were associated with political dissent, ideas of persecution and social and economic change. It also considers the leadership of the Medieval papacy and its contribution to the transformation and condemnation of religious and heretical movements. The module finally explores the reasons why popular religious movements provoked such strong reactions and compares and contrasts the treatment of these religious and heretical movements with that given to other social minorities (especially women, lepers and homosexuality).



The course will draw on narrative, hagiographical, documentary and visual sources. The course will require students to engage with primary sources, and to think critically about theoretical approaches toward the above mentioned themes.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5023 - The American Civil War Era 1848-1877 (30 credits)

This course will examine this key era of US history by examining the key political and social events, developments in the history of ideas and historiographical controversies from the victory over Mexico to the final withdrawal of US troops from the South. It will focus on the changes that occurred and the changing interpretations of them. Students will be able to see the interplay of forces and ideas that led to a conflict that few, if any, wanted and lasted for longer than anyone expected. Historical and fictional depictions in art and film will be evaluated for the ways they shape perspectives. The key historical topics include the rise of slavery as a public issue in the late 1840s, the attempts to find compromise within the Constitutional framework, the activities of the extremists, the changing nature and goals of the war, the effects the war had on both sides, the plans for the post-war period, the changing elite and popular attitudes, the nature of the final, pragmatic arrangements that the country accepted. Students will be able to pursue topics of their choice alongside and as part of these themes.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5028 - The Crusades (30 credits)

This module introduces students to the circumstances behind and motives for the crusading movement, to the key events of early crusades, and to the rise and fall of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem. Extensive use is made of primary sources in translation. Topics to be covered include: The background of the crusades; The historiography of the crusades: What were the crusades?; The First Crusade; The Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem; The second Crusade; The fall of Jerusalem in 1187; The Third Crusade; The Fourth Crusade; Crusading within Europe; The capture of Damietta; The crusade of Louis IX

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5031 - African History since 1800 (30 credits)

This module is meant to introduce students to the key processes and dynamics of sub-Saharan African history during the past two centuries. The course covers three chronological periods: the pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial eras. In their study of the pre-colonial period students, will especially familiarize themselves with the changing nature of African slavery and the nineteenth-century reconstruction of political authority in the face of economic, environmental and military challenges. The colonial period forms the second section of the course. Here, students will gain an understanding of the modalities of the colonial conquest, the creation and operation of colonial economies and the socio-cultural engineering brought about by European rule. The study of the colonial period will end with an analysis of African nationalisms and decolonisation. In the final part of the course, students will develop an understanding of the challenges faced by independent African nations. The nature of the post-colonial African state will be explored alongside such topical issues as the Rwandan Genocide and the African AIDS epidemic.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5035 - History of Modern Medicine and Medical Ethics,1800-2000 (30 credits)

Focusing on Great Britain, Europe and the United States, the module examines the history of modern medicine and medical ethics, from the development of public health, social Darwinism and eugenics in the 19th century to contemporary issues of human rights in biomedicine in the 20th century. The module explores the role of the state, and assesses medicine and psychiatry in modern warfare. The course will chart continuity and change in medical practice and research in different national and ideological settings. Concepts such as the peoples' community, the Volksgemeinschaft, the race, the nation, the idea of National Socialism, mankind etc. were of importance in initiating and sanctioning German medicine. While an understanding of medicine in the Third Reich is important in charting the development of modern medical ethics, the module will give due considerations to evolving health systems elsewhere in Europe and the United States. The module assesses the extent to which political formations shaped the understanding of ethics and the code of conduct of the medical profession, and explores the origins of the Nuremberg Doctors' Trial. The module looks at the mechanisms to protect human rights in human experimentation since the beginning of the Cold War, and examines the political, professional and institutional factors which shaped the history of bioethics and the Human Genome Project.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5055 - Russia: 1855-1945 Reform, Revolution and War (30 credits)

This module introduces students to Russian history from the end of the Crimean War to the Soviet victory in the Second World War. It will equip students to understand the continuities and differences between tsarism and Soviet communism. Themes covered will include: the reforms of Alexander II; the late tsarist autocracy; populism and Marxism; the 1905 revolution; the First World War; the February and October revolutions; the intelligentsia and revolution; revolutionary ideology; the building of socialism, c. 1917-1928; the Stalin revolution, c. 1928-1941; the Second World War.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5065 - British History c. 1480-1620 (30 credits)

In 1500 England and Scotland were both Catholic, and entirely separate countries. In 1603 they were united under one ruler, the Scottish King James VI who inherited the throne of England on the death of Elizabeth I. This module will introduce students to the political history of the period, meeting famous characters such as Henry VIII and Mary, Queen of Scots, but it will also get beyond headline-grabbing monarchs to explore complex political realities. Alongside the contested process of religious change and the secret scheming between England and Scotland, we shall consider the impact of propaganda on the people of different parts of the British Isles. Students will encounter a wide variety of sources, ranging from political pictures and tracts to acts of Parliament and diplomatic correspondence.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5075 - Marvels, Monsters and Freaks 1780-1920 (30 credits)

Society has always been fascinated by those deemed different and over time, unusual people have been viewed and constructed in a myriad of ways. The course explores the continuities and changes surrounding those classed as different. Broadly, the course will investigate the changing nature of difference from the 1780s to the 1920s. It will examine the body and mind as contested sites; spaces occupied by those considered different; the establishment of normality versus deviance; the changing conceptions of difference over time; relationships between unusual people and the wider society. Using a broad range of sources, from novels to film, the course will trace the shifting cultural constructions of difference.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5092 - Armies at War 1914-1918 (30 credits)

This module will offer a comparative study of the armies of the Great Powers during the First World War. The module will adopt the ‘war and society’ approach to this topic and so will focus on the social composition and combat effectiveness of the armies concerned, along with civil-military relations and the higher strategic direction of the war. This module will therefore seek to answer some of the key questions of the Great War: how did the Great Powers manage to raise and sustain such large armies, why did soldiers continue to fight, given the appalling casualty rates; how politicised were the armies of the Great War, why were politicians allowed to embark on foolhardy military adventures, how crucial were the Americans in securing Entente victory and how effectively were economies adapted to meet the demands of the armies? Comparative topics for discussion in seminars will include; planning for war, recruitment and conscription, the officer corps, generals and politicians, discipline and morale; and attitudes to technological advances.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI566 - History Dissertation (30 credits)

The purpose of the Stage Two History Dissertation is to provide students with the opportunity to explore a topic of their choice in depth, and at a more critical level than is usually possible within the constraints of a normal coursework essay. The essay must not be more than 10,000 words in length, excluding the bibliography. Students choose a topic in consultation with a member of the History School, who will provide supervision and advice on sources. A definitive title must be submitted to the supervisor by the end of the Autumn Term (Term 1) of the student's second year. The Dissertation will be written in the Spring Term (Term 2) and must be submitted by 12 noon on the first Monday of the Summer Term (Term 3). Unlike the dissertation in the Special Subject, the Stage Two History Dissertation may be based on the extended reading of secondary sources, although students will be encouraged to use primary sources wherever possible. Topics should not relate directly to the Special Subject which the student intends to take in their third year.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6002 - The British Army and Empire c1750-1920 (30 credits)

Between 1815 and 1914 Britain engaged in only one European war. The Empire was, therefore, the most consistent and most continuous influence in shaping the army as an institution and moulding public opinion of the army. This module will examine various aspects of the British army’s imperial experience between 1750 and 1920 (although the focus will fall, for the most part on the small wars of the Victorian period). The central focus will be on the campaigning in Africa and India, exploring how a relatively small number of British soldiers managed to gain and retain control of such vast territories and populations. Through an examination of a wide range of literary and visual primary sources, the module will also explore how the imperial soldier specifically and imperial campaigning generally were presented to and reconfigured by a domestic audience.



Topics covered will include:

The everyday life of the imperial soldier

Representing the imperial hero: Henry Havelock and Charles Gordon

The portrayal of imperial campaigning in contemporary popular culture

The legacy of the Boer War: commemoration, doctrine and reform

The modern memory of colonial warfare: from Lives of a Bengal Lancer to Zulu

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6011 - From Crisis to Revolution: France 1774-1799 (30 credits)

The French Revolution continues rightly to be regarded as one the great turning points of modern European History. This course will introduce students to the political, social and economic context of France from the accession of Louis XVI to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. It will explore and assess the divergent interpretations for the origins of the revolutionary conflagration of 1789. There will also be an attempt to understand how a revolution based on the triad 'liberty, equally and fraternity,' lost of sight of its humanitarian aspirations and quickly descended into fratricidal political terror and warfare on a trans-European scale. Students will also be encouraged to cast a critical eye on the vexed question of the French Revolution's contribution to modern political culture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6034 - Anglo-French Relations 1904 - 1945 (30 credits)

The diplomatic relationship between Britain and France in the first half of the twentieth century can be seen as a marriage of convenience. Not natural historical allies, the British and French governments were forced increasingly to work together to combat the tensions in Europe that led to the outbreak of the First and Second World Wars.

This module explores the love-hate relationship between the two countries in tracing the origins of the Entente Cordiale, and by addressing some of the major historiographical debates in twentieth century international history. Lectures will provide students with an overview of these debates and the topics listed below, and seminars will encourage students to consider their understanding of these areas and critically engage with them through discussion.

Themes explored will typically include, imperialism, political reform and its impact on foreign policy formation, democratisation, the rise of nationalism, peacemaking at the end of the two world wars; the Ruhr Crisis, the Treaty of Locarno, the League of Nations; the Kellogg Briand Pact; the Briand Plan; the Geneva disarmament conferences of the late 1920s/early 1930s; Eastern Europe and Russia; different strategies to deal with the rise of Hitler; the fall of France, the rise of Vichy; the secret war; the outbreak of the Cold War.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6036 - Science Satirised (30 credits)

By looking at how science and its practitioners have been represented in or made use of humour, caricature and satire, we gain an important perspective on how science and society have interacted as the former came to dominance as an authoritative source of knowledge. Friends and enemies of science have used humour and satire to gain sympathy or call its claims into question. Where science has provoked hope, fear, admiration or suspicion, where it has been deeply involved in political or military endeavour, where it has overstated its claims or fed visions of a better future, satire has cast popular and elite opinions into sharp relief. From Thomas Shadwell's The Virtuoso and Gulliver's Travels, Georgian and Victorian caricature, science fiction and Cold War film, to The Simpsons and the Infinite Monkey Cage, science and the men and women who have produced it have proved to be fertile sources for comedy and biting wit.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6025 - Everyday Life in Early Modern Europe (30 credits)

This module covers fundamental transformations taking place in European society between c. 1500 and 1800. It focuses specifically on the everyday experiences of early modern Europeans, and how these changed as a result of, amongst others, global expansion, religious change, urbanisation and economic innovation. Through looking at how these transformations at a macro-level affected the micro-level of European households, this module aims to give insight into the ever-changing lives of Europeans before the onset of 'modernisation' in the 19th century. Themes that will be addressed in the lectures and seminars vary from migration, crime, and poverty, to witchcraft, sexuality and material culture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6042 - The British Empire: Sunrise to Sunset (30 credits)

'We seem, as it were, to have conquered and peopled half the world in a fit of absence of mind.'



Sir John Seeley, The Expansion of England (1883)



Despite Seeley's assertion of accidental conquest, at its zenith the British empire decidedly controlled over ¼ of the world's global real estate, and 1/5 of the world's population. The economic, cultural and global impact of British colonialism is still very much apparent today - from contested borders and inter-state disputes, through languages and cultures, to the inequities in wealth and trade that exist between the prosperous 'North' and the underdeveloped 'South'. Why, then, was imperial expansion so vehemently defended by its protagonists in the 19th and 20th Centuries? And what made colonial conquest, colonisation, and economic exploitation of non-European spaces feasible on such a global scale and for so long? These are the 'big questions' that underlie this module. Using documentary sources and specialist texts and articles, we shall investigate various aspects of British colonial rule from the perspective of its practitioners and from that of their colonial 'subjects'. The intention is to try and understand European imperialism on its own terms, to interrogate the cultural and conceptual discourses that underpinned its existence, and to reflect upon the many ways in which the history of European empire has shaped the modern world in which we live today.



Please note that the title of this module is changing. It will run in 2016/2017 as 'A Cultural History of the British Empire.'

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6056 - The British Atlantic World c.1580-1763 (30 credits)

The curriculum works systematically through the exploration and settlement of different regions, with weekly material covering particular migratory pathways, including Chesapeake planters, New England puritans, pirates and settlers in the Caribbean, and other seminal cultural zones including attention to the Middle Colonies and the Lower South. Introductory coverage will explore the "prehistory" of British colonialism through an examination of the plantation of Ulster, and other aspects of migration and imperialism will be treated through engagement with the Scottish experiment at Darien and English attempts to gain footholds in West Africa. The curriculum will concentrate on particular themes to help sustain integrity across this diffuse oceanic domain: encounters with indigenous peoples, Atlantic imperialism, settlement demographics, and cultural folkways. The final weeks of the course will treat points of convergence and integration, including the growth of cities, religious movements, political commonalities, and the eighteenth-century wars for empire in the Atlantic, culminating in the Peace of Paris of 1763.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6064 - Armies at War, 1792-1815 (30 credits)

This module examines the European experience of war during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. The lectures will consider the major national armies (French, Prussian, Austrian, Russian, British and Spanish) and how they were expanded and reformed in the wake of the French Revolution. Seminars will consider key themes, such as the nature of the officer corps, recruitment and conscription, the nature of 'People's War’, interactions between soldiers and civilians, developments in tactics, logistics and discipline and morale. The approach taken, will largely be that of ‘war and society’, focusing on the social history of the armies but there will also be some consideration of operational history and cultural history approaches to this topic. While this approach moves significantly away from ‘old military history’ with its focus on generals and battles, there will be some consideration of Napoleon’s methods of warfare and how these were successfully countered by his enemies.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6072 - Vikings: A Global Saga (30 credits)

Vikings, in the popular imagination, are commonly perceived as horn-helmeted, blood-thirsty pirates who killed and pillaged their way across Europe in the Middle Ages with their blood-stained axes. In reality, Vikings did much more than that. They changed the existing early-medieval political order for good; they contributed a great deal to the international trade, economy and urbanisation of different parts of Europe; and they explored and settled the uncharted territories of the North Atlantic, specifically the Scottish Isles, Iceland, Greenland, and as far as 'Vinland' (parts of Newfoundland), becoming the first Europeans to reach and temporarily settle in the North American continent; and they were perhaps the most engaging story-tellers of their time. By the time the Norse settled down and ceased raiding in the second half of the eleventh century, they had fundamentally altered the political, religious, economic and military history of much of the known world. This course will attempt to separate fact from fiction by critically reading and analysing primary source documents alongside archaeological, linguistic and place-name evidence, and thereby uncover the real history that lies behind the well-known stories of the Viking World. In addition, the students will be introduced to the major historiographical debates related to the Viking Age.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI613 - Conflict in Seventeenth Century Britain (30 credits)

Seventeenth-century Britain experienced considerable division and tension, most obviously in the Civil Wars in mid-century between the countries which comprised the multiple kingdom of Britain. The aim is to examine the reasons for, and the attempted resolution of, major political and religious problems, with a clear sense of the European context in which these events were played out. Topics to be studied will include the ideological clashes between crown and parliament in England; the political and cultural divisions of `court' and `country'; religious disunity across the three kingdoms; the expansion of a `public sphere' of politics and religion; the failure of republican government in the 1650s; the instability of Restoration politics and the coming of the Glorious Revolution; and Britain's changing role in Europe across the century.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI767 - Churchill's Army: the British Army in the Second World War (30 credits)

WAR STUDIES STUDENTS WILL HAVE PRIORITY ON THIS MODULE.

The module will explore the nature of the British Army in the Second World War. How it reacted to the crushing defeats of 1940 in France and 1942 in the Far East before transforming itself into a war-winning force. The course will begin with the inter-war army examining its lack of doctrine and the confused role it had in British and imperial defence plans. From there it will move on to examine the transformation of the army from a pre-war small professional outfit to a vast conscript army, before concluding on the situation in 1945, the retention of peacetime conscription and adaptation to the Cold War world. It will take a broad approach to military history, studying the political, economic and cultural realities behind the force.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI769 - From Blitzkrieg to Baghdad: Armoured Warfare in Theory, Practise and Im (30 credits)

The module will explore the nature of the nature of armoured warfare. It will reveal how quickly advocates of these new machines developed theories of armoured warfare and how these were applied to the battlefield. It will show the supposed decline of the tank and heavy armour in the years since the collapse of the Communist Bloc, only to be given a new lease of life by the two Gulf Wars. The course will also look at the cultural ideas behind the tank, how it has seeped into the imagination as a symbol of modernity and change: for example, the crucial importance of tanks to images of the Hungarian uprising in 1956 and to the Beijing protests of 1989.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI789 - The Art of Death (30 credits)

This module explores the place of death within late medieval English culture, focusing especially on the visual evidence of tombs, architecture, and illuminated manuscripts. It will begin by examining how ideas about death and the dead were expressed in works of art before the arrival of the Black Death to England in 1348. We will then explore the ways in which funerary sculpture, architecture and painting changed after, and perhaps because of, the devastation of the plague. These sources will be set within the context of literary, documentary and liturgical evidence. Further, it will explore how historians approach the history of death from different disciplinary perspectives, and consider the place of visual evidence within a range of sources and methods.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI795 - Inviting Doomsday: US Environmental (30 credits)

Condemned by the international community for refusing to sign the Kyoto Accords, rendered powerless by electricity blackouts, and stricken by the Hurricane Katrina disaster, the United States of America is today embroiled in a narrative of environmental controversy and catastrophe. This module explores to what extent the USA has been ‘inviting doomsday’ throughout the modern (twentieth-century) period. Commencing with an introductory session on writing and researching American environmental history, the module is then split into four sections: Science and Recreation, Doomsday Scenarios, Environmental Protest, and Consuming Nature. Over the twelve weeks we will consider a range of environmental issues that include wildlife management in national parks, pesticide spraying on prairie farms, nuclear testing in Nevada, and Mickey Mouse rides in Disneyland. By the end of the module, we will have constructed a comprehensive map of the United States based around themes of ecological transformation, assimilation and decay.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CO518 - Algorithms, Correctness and Efficiency (15 credits)

Testing, specification, verification

• Specifying test properties, and more general logical properties

• Scaling testing

• Pre- and post-conditions, Hoare Logic, loop invariants



Data and Algorithm Design

• Dynamic data structures: trees, queues, heaps and priority queues;

• Sorting and searching algorithms, both in their own right and as components of more complex algorithms;

• Graph algorithms: depth and breadth-first search, union-find, minimal-cost spanning trees;



Estimation and efficiency

• Informal estimation and approximate calculations;

• Detailed analysis of the time complexity of some simple algorithms including best, worst and average behaviour;

• Techniques for analysing and comparing the asymptotic behaviour of algorithms.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO320 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to object-oriented software development. Software pervades many aspects of most professional fields and sciences, and an understanding of the development of software applications is useful as a basis for many disciplines. This module covers the development of simple software systems. Students will gain an understanding of the software development process, and learn to design and implement applications in a popular object-oriented programming language. Fundamentals of classes and objects are introduced, and key features of class descriptions: constructors, methods and fields. Method implementation through assignment, selection control structures, iterative control structures and other statements is introduced. Collection objects are also covered and the availability of library classes as building blocks. Throughout the course, the quality of class design and the need for a professional approach to software development is emphasized

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO324 - Computer Systems (15 credits)

14. A synopsis of the curriculum

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental behaviour and components (hardware and software) of a typical computer system, and how they collaborate to manage resources and provide services. The module has two strands: ‘Hardware Architecture’ and ‘Operating Systems and Networks,’ which form around 35% and 65% of the material respectively. Both strands contain material which is of general interest to computer users; quite apart from their academic value, they will be useful to anyone using any modern computer system.

Hardware Architecture

Data representation: Bits, bytes and words. Numeric and non-numeric data. Number representation.

Computer architecture: Fundamental building blocks (logic gates, flip-flops, counters, registers). The fetch/execute cycle. Instruction sets and types.

Data storage: Memory hierarchies and associated technologies. Physical and virtual memory.

Operating Systems and Networks

Operating systems principles. Abstractions. Processes and resources. Security. Application Program Interfaces.

Device interfaces: Handshaking, buffering, programmed and interrupt-driven i/o. Direct Memory Access.

File Systems: Physical structure. File and directory organisation, structure and contents. Naming hierarchies and access. Backup.

Background and history of networking and the Internet.

Networks and protocols: LANs and WANs, layered protocol design. The TCP/IP protocol stack; theory and practice. Connection-oriented and connectionless communication. Unicast, multicast and broadcast. Naming and addressing. Application protocols; worked examples: SMTP, HTTP).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO328 - Human Computer Interaction (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to human-computer interaction. Fundamental aspects of human physiology and psychology are introduced and key features of interaction and common interaction styles delineated. A variety of analysis and design methods are introduced (e.g. GOMS. heuristic evaluation, user-centred and contextual design techniques). Throughout the course, the quality of design and the need for a professional, integrated and user-centred approach to interface development is emphasised. Rapid and low-fidelity prototyping feature as one aspect of this.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO323 - Databases and the Web (15 credits)

• An introduction to databases and SQL, focussing on their use as a source for content for websites.

• Creating static content for websites using HTML(5) and controlling their appearance using CSS.

• Using PHP to integrate static and dynamic content for web sites.

• Securing dynamic websites.

• Using Javascript to improve interactivity and maintainability in web content.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO520 - Further Object-Oriented Programming (15 credits)

This module builds on the foundation of object-oriented design and implementation found in module CO320 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming to provide a deeper understanding of and facility with object-oriented program design and implementation. More advanced features of object-orientation, such as inheritance, abstract classes, nested classes, graphical-user interfaces (GUIs), exceptions, input-output are covered. These allow an application-level view of design and implementation to be explored. Throughout the module the quality of application design and the need for a professional approach to software development is emphasized.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO527 - Operating Systems and Architecture (15 credits)

This module aims to provide students with a more in-depth understanding of the fundamental behaviour and components (hardware and software) of a typical computer system, and how they collaborate to manage resources and provide services. It will consider systems other than the standard PC running Windows, in order to broaden students’ outlook. The module has two strands: “Operating Systems” and “Architecture”, which each form around 50% of the material.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO528 - Introduction to Intelligent Systems (15 credits)

This module covers the basic principles of machine learning and the kinds of problems that can be solved by such techniques. You learn about the philosophy of AI, how knowledge is represented and algorithms to search state spaces. The module also provides an introduction to both machine learning and biologically inspired computation.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO532 - Database Systems (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of database systems. It extends the study of information systems in Stage 1 by focusing on the design, implementation and use of database systems. Topics include database management systems architecture, data modelling and database design, query languages, recent developments and future prospects.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO539 - Web Development (15 credits)

Building scaleable web sites using client-side and and server-side frameworks (e.g. GWT, CakePHP, Ruby on Rails).

Data transfer technologies, e.g. XML and JSON.

Building highly interactive web sites using e.g. AJAX.

Web services

Deploying applications and services to the web: servers, infrastructure services, and traffic and performance analysis.

Web and application development for mobile devices.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

HI796 - Inviting Doomsday: US Environmental (30 credits)

Condemned by the international community for refusing to sign the Kyoto Accords, rendered powerless by electricity blackouts, and stricken by the Hurricane Katrina disaster, the United States of America is today embroiled in a narrative of environmental controversy and catastrophe. This module explores to what extent the USA has been ‘inviting doomsday’ throughout the modern (twentieth-century) period. Commencing with an introductory session on writing and researching American environmental history, the module is then split into four sections: Science and Recreation, Doomsday Scenarios, Environmental Protest, and Consuming Nature. Over the twelve weeks we will consider a range of environmental issues that include wildlife management in national parks, pesticide spraying on prairie farms, nuclear testing in Nevada, and Mickey Mouse rides in Disneyland. By the end of the module, we will have constructed a comprehensive map of the United States based around themes of ecological transformation, assimilation and decay.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI770 - From Blitzkrieg to Baghdad: Armoured Warfare in Theory, Practise and Im (30 credits)

The module will explore the nature of the nature of armoured warfare. It will reveal how quickly advocates of these new machines developed theories of armoured warfare and how these were applied to the battlefield. It will show the supposed decline of the tank and heavy armour in the years since the collapse of the Communist Bloc, only to be given a new lease of life by the two Gulf Wars. The course will also look at the cultural ideas behind the tank, how it has seeped into the imagination as a symbol of modernity and change: for example, the crucial importance of tanks to images of the Hungarian uprising in 1956 and to the Beijing protests of 1989.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI787 - The Nature of Command (30 credits)

The course will provide students with a historical understanding of command at a variety of levels by looking at various types of battle scenarios, both strategic and tactical. The course will take an international perspective and explore the changing nature of command across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Seminars will focus on case-studies of a range of conflicts and commanders. Conflicts covered will include the two World Wars, Malaya, Korea and Kosovo; in addition there will be in-depth investigation of the command styles of Haig, Montgomery and Patton.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI762 - The Cultural History Of The Great War: Britain, France And Germany In C (30 credits)

The history of the Great War is a subject of perennial fascination, for this war left its imprint on British/European society to an extent almost unparalleled in modern history. No previous war matched it in scale and brutality. The military history and the course of events have been told many times. This course, by contrast, focuses on the social and cultural upheavals of the Great War. The aim is to move beyond narrow military history and examine the war's socio-cultural impact on British and European societies. Furthermore, it hopes to overcome historians' fixation with national histories. The First World War was, by definition, a transnational event and this course will fully explore the comparative method.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6065 - Armies at War, 1792-1815 (30 credits)

This module examines the European experience of war during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. The lectures will consider the major national armies (French, Prussian, Austrian, Russian, British and Spanish) and how they were expanded and reformed in the wake of the French Revolution. Seminars will consider key themes, such as the nature of the officer corps, recruitment and conscription, the nature of 'People's War’, interactions between soldiers and civilians, developments in tactics, logistics and discipline and morale. The approach taken, will largely be that of ‘war and society’, focusing on the social history of the armies but there will also be some consideration of operational history and cultural history approaches to this topic. While this approach moves significantly away from ‘old military history’ with its focus on generals and battles, there will be some consideration of Napoleon’s methods of warfare and how these were successfully countered by his enemies.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6066 - The East India Company, 1600-1857 (60 credits)

The English East India Company (founded 1600) is the most famous corporation in world history. Its remarkable geographical expanse as a business connecting the British Isles with the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans makes it a protagonist in histories of globalisation. But the company's impressive longevity from the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I to the reign of Queen Victoria make the Company a common institutional thread whose changing character in each period can illuminate the broader story of English history as well as the separate histories of the territories the Company engaged with. Historians have debated what the Company represented. The Company did so much to stimulate global trade, but was it a private business in the modern sense? It ruled British territory on behalf of the British state, but was it a state in its own right? This course encourages participants to engage with these (and other) large and important questions and will digest the high quality literature that the company has rightly attracted. But the core of this class will be the challenge and joy of digesting the remarkable corpus of documents and writings that the Company issued or provoked including all of the most important political economists from the early seventeenth century to the late nineteenth: from Thomas Mun through Edmund Burke to James and John Stuart Mill. Participants will read and reflect upon a wide variety of materials from translated Persian documents trying to make sense of the Company's operations, from the correspondence of Company factors in Japan, to the company's charters, board room minutes, pamphlets, and histories as well as its art and architecture in the cities it did so much to develop. Participants will therefore receive a broad understanding of seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth century British, Indian, and global history; they will also develop expertise in the following sub-fields: cultural, art, political, parliamentary, global, economic, constitutional, and business history.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6071 - The United Nations in the Twentieth Century (60 credits)

The United Nations was established by the victorious states of the Second World War in 1945. The preamble to the Charter of the United Nations declared that the organisation's aim is to 'save succeeding generations from the scourge of war’; promote fundamental human rights and the rights of nations large and small; maintain international law and promote social progress. This module will explore how successfully the organisation has met its founding ideals. In doing so, it will consider major issues that faced the United Nations during the first fifty years of its existence. It will examine how policy was formulated in the committee rooms of the General Assembly and the Security Council. It will then explore how effective such policy proved in the context of the Cold War and the changing post-colonial environment of the late twentieth century.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6058 - Saints, Relics & Churches in Medieval Europe c.500-1500 (60 credits)

Saints were a central feature of the Christian religion in medieval Europe, and they also had a profound influence on culture and society. This module explores the development of the cult of saints from Late Antiquity to the eve of the Reformation. Some of the main topics that will be considered include relics, miracle stories, pilgrimage, and artistic production. In addition to these topics, the module will consider the impact that saints and relics had on the building of churches and the feast days in the calendar. We will look at a wide variety of sources including illuminated manuscripts, sculpture, stained glass, church buildings, and saints’ lives. All texts will be read in translation.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6060 - After Stalin: The Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union (60 credits)

This module addresses the politics, ideology and culture of the USSR in the post-war era. It starts with an exploration of late Stalinism, before covering Khrushchev's reforms, Brezhnev’s neo-Stalinism and Gorbachev's perestroika. Along with these themes, time will be devoted to: the intelligentsia; labour camps and the release of detainees in the 1950s; Soviet science; religion and spirituality; emerging nationalism; the Human Rights Movement; ‘village’ prose; the Soviet economy; foreign policy and policy in the ‘near abroad’; the collapse of the USSR; and Yeltsin’s reformism and the new Russian state. The approach is interdisciplinary, and this will be reflected in the wide range of primary sources used; and throughout the module students will be introduced to the relevant historiography.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6061 - Human Experiments & Human Rights during the Cold War (60 credits)

This Special Subject examines the history of human rights in human experimentation during the Cold War, and traces the development of biological and chemical warfare research from the Second World War through to Allied military research in the 1950s and 1960s. It charts continuity and change in the development of medical ethics standards in modern military research on humans, and assesses the extent to which research subjects were informed of the risks involved in the research.



The module explores Allied war-time research and the international response to news of Nazi medical atrocities. The Nuremberg Medical Trial and the Nuremberg Code are important milestones in the history of informed consent and modern medical ethics. The module looks at the nuclear testing programme that was conducted by the United States and the United Kingdom in the 1950s, and investigates in detail the evolving chemical warfare programme at Porton Down in the United Kingdom where one of the servicemen, Ronald Maddison, died from exposure to the nerve agent sarin in 1953.



The history of research into incapacitants and biological warfare agents is located into a wider context of an evolving system of medical ethics in which non-therapeutic experiments without consent were increasingly seen as unethical and unlawful. Finally, the attempts by veteran groups for recognition and compensation will be examined as part of a wider political history of the Cold War which has shaped our understanding and memory of the more recent past.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6062 - Dynasty, Death & Diplomacy: England, Scotland & France 1503-1603 (60 credits)

This special subject will allow students to discuss the changing diplomatic and cultural relationships between England, France and Scotland in the hundred years before the Anglo-Scottish dynastic union of 1603. This period was one of substantial political and religious upheaval and as an unintended consequence of the different processes of religious reform in each country, international relations changed completely. Students will be encouraged to challenge the traditional narrative of a straightforward shift in Scotland's primary diplomatic allegiance from France to England as a result of religious changes. They will examine in detail subjects such as Henry VIII's wars in France and Scotland, the dynastic significance of Mary, Queen of Scots, and the increasingly tense diplomacy undertaken between Scotland and England in the approach to James VI's accession to the English throne in 1603. The module will be structured chronologically, but several themes will run throughout. These include the significance of propaganda and textual responses to politics. Through this, students will be encouraged to consider the significance of conflict and change in the creation of public political discourse, and challenge teleological narratives surrounding the growth of the public sphere. A second theme will be the impact of religious change on broader political allegiances: did the Reformation fundamentally change how diplomacy worked? Thirdly, students will be encouraged to consider the differing political and cultural cultures of each of the three kingdoms under consideration, and how such domestic concerns played in to diplomatic interactions.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6063 - California: The Golden State (60 credits)

This special subject explores California history from Native American times to modern day. It charts the rise to power of the US Pacific Coast and the many complexities that come with mass immigration, technological innovation and cultural frontierism. The special subject does not provide a simple narrative of state history, but instead employs a series of case studies to illuminate key periods of California's past and present, auto-stops, if you will, to navigate the Golden State as both a place, an idea and, most significantly, an image. The case studies also facilitate an interdisciplinary approach to the topic, for example, the Great Depression in California is considered by a session on the life of the hobo, his music, migration, work and community in the period. Sources here include Nels Anderson’s classic sociological text 'On Hobos and Homelessness’ and collections of Okie/hobo music of the period. A number of movie showings will relate both the rise of Hollywood as a state industry as well as Hollywood’s own social commentary on the California experience. The California dream and the notion of California exceptionalism will be critiqued across the module. Students will be expected to immerse themselves in the culture industry of the state and truly explore what (if anything) makes California so special or Golden.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI605 - Undergraduate Dissertation (30 credits)

This module is designed to give final-year Single or Joint Honours History students an opportunity to independently research a historical topic, under the supervision of an expert in the field. Students are required to submit a dissertation (maximum length 9,000 words) based on research undertaken into primary sources, and an extended reading of secondary sources. It is designed to allow students to engage in their own historical research into any chosen topic (the only stipulation being that there must be a member of staff available within the School of History who is able to supervise the topic), and to present their research in a cogent and accessible format.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6029 - The Great War: British Memory, History and Culture (60 credits)

The aim of this course will be to show how far the Great War has infiltrated into modern culture and to test the validity of Paul Fussell's thesis that the Great War created Britain's modern cultural atmosphere. Fussell contends that modern society is marked by a love of irony, paradox and contradiction formed by the experience of the Western Front. Against this theory we will set the ideas of Samuel Hynes and Martin Stephen, as argued in their works, A War Imagined and The Price of Pity. This course will explore how the Great War has influenced our lives and why we have certain images of it. Why, for example, do most people associate the Great War with words such as 'waste', 'futility' and 'disillusion'? Why does the morality of the Great War seem so tarnished, while the Second World War is conceived as a just war? The course will be based upon literature (high and popular), poetry, art, architecture and film. We will therefore be 'reading' a 'primary text' each week. The course will serve to highlight many of themes of the 19th and 20th century British survey courses and will further contextualise the course on Britain and the Home Front in the Second World War.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6031 - Food, Fights and Festivals (60 credits)

Much of the lives of urban dwellers in early modern Europe was played out in city streets and squares. This is where people came together to work, shop, and eat, but also to fight, celebrate, show their devotion, and express their grievances. Through looking at European street life between 1600 and 1800 this special subject tackles key questions on how early modern urban society was shaped and how this changed over time. As such, this source-based module will address important historiographical controversies on order, power, and control, on the relationship between popular and elite culture, and on the appropriation of urban space. It will encourage students to reflect critically upon the impact of fundamental changes in early

modern European society such as the growing role of the state, urbanisation, the disciplining process, and the rise of the public sphere.



By using a combination of visual and textual sources, participants will examine urban street life through topics such as the economy of the street, protests and riots, street crime, poverty, and entertainment. Students will be challenged to assess the importance of concepts such as honour and dishonour, order and disorder, formality and informality, and public and private,

and how these concepts shaped urban experiences in different European countries in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. By studying street life in its broadest sense, the participants will be required to engage with various (sub-)disciplines such as cultural history, social history, art history, economic history, and gender history.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6039 - The Rights Revolution: The 20th Century US Supreme Court & Society (60 credits)

This course will look at the central theme of the "Rights Era"- the move in the U. S. from a customary deference to tradition and view of the mainstream to the enforcement of political equality with far less regard for mainstream views. It will examine competing views of what "equality" means and consider the numerous groups that have demanded it since 1945 and the way they both fought for their causes and created the turbulence and confrontation in American society after 1960. These groups include, but are not limited to, African Americans, Hispanic-Americans, women, the disabled, certain religious groups, those who have faced discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation, as well as other groups that followed similar legal strategies, such as environmentalists and those who seek greater guarantees of property rights, free speech rights, and gun rights. This not only is an essential topic for understanding the modern United States but as UK is currently undergoing similar legal changes, it has meaning for contemporary Britain.



This course assumes no prior knowledge of American law or of the courts in the United States. It can also include subjects of interest to students not listed above, assuming sufficient materials are available on those topics. It aims to places this groups & their activities in the context of the time and show how the strategies worked (or failed) and the reaction of both elite and general opinion to the claims.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6041 - The Crusades in the Thirteenth Century (60 credits)

This course examines the place of crusading within Medieval society focusing on the thirteenth century, especially on the period between c. 1200 and 1291. It will consider crusading against the Muslims in the Holy Land as well as crusading within Europe, especially in Southern France against the Cathar heresy and in northern Europe, where crusading was used as a device to convert the pagans in the Baltic region. The module will deal with issues such as holy war, ecclesiastical control over crusading, conversion of heretics and pagans, trades within the Mediterranean and with Medieval Russia, military strategies, funding warfare, political alliances, military orders, diplomatic relations with the Greek and Arab worlds, preaching, pilgrimage and cultural encounters. The course will be structured around themes including: what is a crusade; how to plan a crusade; crusades in the twelfth century; the Third Crusade; the military orders; crusading castles; trades; cultural encounters; crusade and mission; the Fourth crusade; the crusades against the Cathars; crusades in northern Europe; the Fifth crusade; St. Francis of Assisi and the conversion of al-Kamil; Frederick II and the conquest of Jerusalem; Louis IX and the crusades; the fall of Acre in 1291; the trial of the Templars.



Issues such as warfare, the importance of religion, and the presence of the Church within the Medieval society will inform the course's approach to the material. The course will draw on narrative, hagiographical, documentary and visual sources. The course will require students to engage with primary sources, and to think critically about theoretical approaches toward these issues. If possible, a visit the relevant museums and archival collections in London will be arranged.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6012 - From Crisis to Revolution: France 1774-1799 (30 credits)

The French Revolution continues rightly to be regarded as one the great turning points of modern European History. This course will introduce students to the political, social and economic context of France from the accession of Louis XVI to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. It will explore and assess the divergent interpretations for the origins of the revolutionary conflagration of 1789. There will also be an attempt to understand how a revolution based on the triad 'liberty, equally and fraternity,' lost of sight of its humanitarian aspirations and quickly descended into fratricidal political terror and warfare on a trans-European scale. Students will also be encouraged to cast a critical eye on the vexed question of the French Revolution's contribution to modern political culture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI6024 - Napoleon and Europe, 1799 - 1815 (60 credits)

A decade ago John Dunne, in a review article, described Napoleonic history as a poor relation of the French Revolution that seemed on the verge of ‘making good.’ These prophetic words described well the growing interest among scholars in Bonaparte’s ambitious Imperial mission extending beyond France’s ‘natural frontiers.’ The work of historians Stuart Woolf and Michael Broers has postulated that the Napoleonic mission to 'integrate Europe under a single system of governance' could be viewed as a form of 'cultural imperialism in a European setting.' This special subject will introduce students to the pros and cons of this historiographical debate. It will give final year students an alternative means of engaging with the familiar historical category of ‘Empire.’ There is no shortage of source material translated into English relating to this period. Indeed the memorial de Saint Helene has been available to the Anglophone world since 1824. Consequently a critical and in-depth engagement with primary material will be one of the priorities of this special subject. The focus on French expansion abroad, in the early nineteenth century, challenges one to move away from understanding the Napoleonic Empire in national terms; this course in essence, by its very nature, is European in both scope and content. To do this it will explore processes of acculturation and international competition on a thematic basis. It will examine, in broad multi-national manner, the complex interaction between centre and periphery or what Italians, more prosaically, describe as conflict between ‘stato reale’ and ‘stato civile.’ Napoleon was his own best advocate when it came to forging his posthumous legacy. Students will be encouraged to appraise critically his memoirs and understand that behind claims of progress lay a brutal struggle for the fiscal military resources of Europe. Yet, even more important will be to consider that while the military and political effects of the ‘grand Empire’ were ephemeral, it created a judicial and administrative edifice which survived well beyond 1815 and continues to shape European civilisation to this day. Of course, laws do not merely structure the powers of governmental action but have a complex impact on notions of citizenship, the economy and culture (especially family life). This special subject will investigate the Napoleonic Empire in its many facets. Students will be urged actively to pursue their individual interests in either war and society, Empire, political culture and/or gender.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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HI6006 - Anglo-Saxon Culture: Word, Image and Power (30 credits)

The written word was extraordinarily powerful in the Anglo-Saxon period. Words traced with a finger in a bowl of water were drunk as a remedy for sickness; engraved on helmets they protected their wearers; inscribed in the first person they made swords speak. In Latin, Old English and Old Norse, in the Roman alphabet, in runes and sometimes in code, words were used to govern, persuade, protect, heal, ward off evil, inspire meditation, and work magic. This course examines how the use of the written word changed in the Anglo-Saxon period, how Old English increasingly became the language of government and prayer, how runes were used, and evidence for levels of literacy. We will look at a wide variety of sources including illuminated manuscripts, stone sculpture, medical remedies, rituals, lawcodes and inscriptions on objects such as helmets and swords. This course thereby serves as an introduction to many aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture. All texts will be read in translation and no prior knowledge of the period is required.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5066 - British History c. 1480-1620 (30 credits)

In 1500 England and Scotland were both Catholic, and entirely separate countries. In 1603 they were united under one ruler, the Scottish King James VI who inherited the throne of England on the death of Elizabeth I. This module will introduce students to the political history of the period, meeting famous characters such as Henry VIII and Mary, Queen of Scots, but it will also get beyond headline-grabbing monarchs to explore complex political realities. Alongside the contested process of religious change and the secret scheming between England and Scotland, we shall consider the impact of propaganda on the people of different parts of the British Isles. Students will encounter a wide variety of sources, ranging from political pictures and tracts to acts of Parliament and diplomatic correspondence.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5072 - The American Revolution (30 credits)

This source-based class challenges participants to consider the background, causes, and content of the American Revolution from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean from the Stamp Act debates to the election of Thomas Jefferson as President. Students will be asked to digest primary documents from political speeches in the British Parliament, to American political pamphlets. Students will consider the character and place of the American Revolution within European and American economic, political, and cultural development. The course will examine the conditions under which American Revolution emerged; the part played by empire, and the distinctive combination of ideological and theological strands that produced a compelling challenge to British Parliamentary authority for the first time.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5032 - African History since 1800 (30 credits)

This module is meant to introduce students to the key processes and dynamics of sub-Saharan African history during the past two centuries. The course covers three chronological periods: the pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial eras. In their study of the pre-colonial period students, will especially familiarize themselves with the changing nature of African slavery and the nineteenth-century reconstruction of political authority in the face of economic, environmental and military challenges. The colonial period forms the second section of the course. Here, students will gain an understanding of the modalities of the colonial conquest, the creation and operation of colonial economies and the socio-cultural engineering brought about by European rule. The study of the colonial period will end with an analysis of African nationalisms and decolonisation. In the final part of the course, students will develop an understanding of the challenges faced by independent African nations. The nature of the post-colonial African state will be explored alongside such topical issues as the Rwandan Genocide and the African AIDS epidemic.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5024 - The American Civil War Era 1848-1877 (30 credits)

This course will examine this key era of US history by examining the key political and social events, developments in the history of ideas and historiographical controversies from the victory over Mexico to the final withdrawal of US troops from the South. It will focus on the changes that occurred and the changing interpretations of them. Students will be able to see the interplay of forces and ideas that led to a conflict that few, if any, wanted and lasted for longer than anyone expected. Historical and fictional depictions in art and film will be evaluated for the ways they shape perspectives. The key historical topics include the rise of slavery as a public issue in the late 1840s, the attempts to find compromise within the Constitutional framework, the activities of the extremists, the changing nature and goals of the war, the effects the war had on both sides, the plans for the post-war period, the changing elite and popular attitudes, the nature of the final, pragmatic arrangements that the country accepted. Students will be able to pursue topics of their choice alongside and as part of these themes.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI5022 - Science, Power and Politics in Twentieth Century Britain (30 credits)

This module covers the period approximately 1900-79 and follows the fortunes of H. G. Wells’ ‘open conspiracy’ – his scheme by which scientists would rule the world. The aim is to understand what scientists (and their friends and critics) thought was the social role of science during this period, and how they sought to make sure that science played that role. We aim to find out why scientists thought a scientific approach to life and society was desirable; how they sought to impose it; and to what extent, or in what ways, they were successful in their aims. Along the way we will see how scientists engaged with particular political ideologies, and with the government. Examples covered include the ‘poverty vs. ignorance’ nutrition debate during the great depression, the development of nuclear power and consumer technology at the Festival of Britain. We will see the pivotal role played by WWII in terms of facilitating scientists’ ambitions to govern, and the rise of psychology as arguably the most influential science in terms of governance. The module makes particular use of fictional and documentary film sources as a means to understand the place of science in public culture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CO600 - Project (30 credits)

The project gives you the opportunity to follow and develop your particular technical interests, undertake a larger and less tightly specified piece of work than you have before (at university), and develop the project organisation, implementation and documentation techniques which you have learnt in other modules. The technical and professional aspects of project courses are seen as particularly important by both employers (who will often bring them up in interviews) and by professional bodies.



The project may be self-proposed or may be selected from a list of project proposals. Typically, a project will involve the specification, design, implementation, documentation and demonstration of a technical artefact. The project is supervised by a member of the academic staff, who holds weekly meetings with the group, during which s/he will give general advice and will assess the progress of the group and the contributions by individual students.



Project deliverables are:

- a technical report, in the style of an academic paper, describing the scientific/technical outcome of the project;

- a well-indexed corpus of material that supports the achievements claimed.

In addition, each individual prepares a report outlining his/her contributions to each of the various aspects of the project. This report should not be a repeat of other material delivered as part of the project, but an assessment of the progress of the project and reflections on what the individual has learnt from undertaking it. In particular, it should include a description of the particular activities and outcomes that individual has contributed to the project, and of how the group worked together. This report will be discussed at a viva voce examination which should include a short presentation/demonstration of the project.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CO620 - Research Project (30 credits)

The project gives you the opportunity to follow and develop your particular technical interests, undertake a larger and less tightly specified piece of work than you have before (at university), and develop the project organisation, implementation and documentation techniques which you have learnt in other modules. The technical and professional aspects of project courses are seen as particularly important by both employers (who will often bring them up in interviews) and by professional bodies.



The project may be self-proposed or may be selected from a list of project proposals. Typically, a project will involve the specification, design, implementation, documentation and demonstration of a technical artefact. The project is supervised by a member of the academic staff, who holds weekly meetings with the group, during which s/he will give general advice and will assess the progress of the group and the contributions by individual students.



Project deliverables are:

- a technical report, in the style of an academic paper, describing the scientific/technical outcome of the project;

- a well-indexed corpus of material that supports the achievements claimed.

In addition, each individual prepares a report outlining his/her contributions to each of the various aspects of the project. This report should not be a repeat of other material delivered as part of the project, but an assessment of the progress of the project and reflections on what the individual has learnt from undertaking it. In particular, it should include a description of the particular activities and outcomes that individual has contributed to the project, and of how the group worked together. This report will be discussed at a viva voce examination which should include a short presentation/demonstration of the project.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CO636 - Cognitive Neural Networks (15 credits)

In this module you learn what is meant by neural networks and how to explain the mathematical equations that underlie them. You also build neural networks using state of the art simulation technology and apply these networks to the solution of problems. In addition, the module discusses examples of computation applied to neurobiology and cognitive psychology.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO637 - Natural Computation (15 credits)

This module enables students to take ideas from the natural sciences and use them as inspiration for new computational techniques. You examine developments in biological-inspired computation and their applications. There is also a practical element to the module; you implement one of the algorithms discussed in the lectures on the computers. Topics covered, include evolutionary computation and swarm intelligence.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO641 - Computer Graphics and Animation (15 credits)

Computer graphics and animation are important for a variety of technical and artistic applications including web design, HCI and GUI development, games and simulations, digital photography and cinema, medical and scientific visualization, etc.



This module introduces the subject from the perspective of computing. You will learn about technologies and techniques for modeling, manipulating, capturing, displaying and storing 2D and 3D scenes, digital images, animations and video. You will also gain practical experience of 3D modelling and animation tools.



Digital Imaging and Video:

Human vision

Colour models

Images, video and 3D

Capture and display

Enhancement and conversion

Formats and compression (e.g. GIF, JPEG, MPEG)



Computer Graphics:

Graphics pipeline

3D object and scene modelling with polygon meshes

Transformations

Projection, clipping and visible surface determination

Illumination and shading

Ray tracing and photorealism



Computer Animation:

Key-frame animation

Warping and morphing

Articulated figures

Kinematics, dynamics and collision detection

Particle systems and flocking

Computer-generated human characters and video-realism

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO643 - Computing Law and Professional Responsibility (15 credits)

The scope of the module is outlined below. Note that topics will not necessarily be delivered in this order

Professional issues and professional organisations.



Data privacy legislation, and other UK laws relating to the professional use of computer systems

Criminal law relating to networked computer use, including new Anti-Terrorism legislation; and their application



Intellectual Property Rights, including Copyright, Patent and Contract Laws

Health & Safety issues.

Computer-based Projects, including the vendor-client relationship and professional responsibilities

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO646 - Computing in the Classroom (15 credits)

Students will spend one half-day per week for ten weeks in a school with a nominated teacher. They will observe sessions taught by their designated teacher and possibly other teachers. Later they will act somewhat in the role of a teaching assistant, by helping individual pupils who are having difficulties or by working with small groups. They may take ‘hotspots’: brief sessions with the whole class where they explain a technical topic or talk about aspects of university life. They must keep a weekly log of their activities. Each student must also devise a special project in consultation with the teacher and with the module convener. They must then implement and evaluate the project.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO657 - Internet of Things (15 credits)

The module will cover a mixture of theoretical and practical topics in the area of the Internet of Things (IoT), that is, the use of Internet technologies to access and interact with objects in the physical world. This will include coverage of the range of sensor and actuator devices available, ways in which they communicate and compute, methods for getting information to and from IoT-enabled devices, and ways of visualising and processing data gained from the IoT. A practical component will consist of building the hardware and software for a sensor network and a system to visualise data from that network.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO659 - Computational Creativity (15 credits)

The module aim is to give students an overview and understanding of key

theoretical, practical and philosophical research and issues around

computational creativity, and to give them practical experience in writing and

evaluating creative software.



The module will cover the following topics:

• Introduction to computational creativity

Examples of computational creativity software e.g. musical systems,

artistic systems, linguistic systems, proof generator systems,

furniture design systems

• Evaluation of computational creativity systems (both of the quality

and the creativity of systems)

• Philosophical issues concerning creativity in computers

• Comparison of computer creativity to human creativity

• Collaborative creativity between humans and computers

• Overview of recent research directions/results in computational

creativity

• Practical experience in writing creative software

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching is by a combination of lectures, providing a broad overview, and seminars, which focus on discussing particular issues and are led by student presentations. Lectures and seminars use a variety of materials, including original documents, films and documentaries, illuminated manuscripts, slide and PowerPoint demonstrations.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination.

Programme aims

For programme aims and learning outcomes please see the programmes specification for each subject below. Please note that outcomes will depend on your specific module selection:

Careers

You develop excellent skills of analysis, frequently assessing multiple and often conflicting sources before condensing opinions into concise, well-structured prose. Graduates are able to demonstrate self-motivation and the ability to work independently, demonstrating to potential employers that they respond positively to various challenges and that they can work to tight schedules and manage heavy workloads.

Many graduates find employment in fields such as journalism and the media, management and administration, local and national civil services, the museums and heritage sector, commerce and banking, teaching and research, and the law.

In a report first published in 2005*, Professor David Nicholls stated: “In recent years, history graduates have become celebrated lawyers, press barons, well-known television and newspaper journalists, famous comedians and entertainers, award-winning authors, heads of advisory bodies and charities, directors of major museums, top diplomats and civil servants, chief constables, high-ranking officers in the armed forces and business millionaires.” In a recent follow-up to the report, Professor Nicholls concluded that, despite the increasingly competitive job market, History graduates continue to excel.

*The Employability of History Students by Professor David Nicholls, The Academy of Higher Education

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

ABB including History, Classics-Ancient History or Classics-Classical Civilisation grade B excluding General Studies and Critical Thinking

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 16 points at HL including History 5 at HL or 6 at SL

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

University funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised but will be updated on our funding page in due course.

Government funding

You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

The Government has confirmed that EU students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year will still have access to student funding support for the duration of their course.

Scholarships

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages.

The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £16480

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

In accordance with changes announced by the UK Government, we are increasing our 2017/18 regulated full-time tuition fees for new and returning UK/EU fee paying undergraduates from £9,000 to £9,250. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise from £4,500 to £4,625. This was subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. This fee will ensure the continued provision of high-quality education.

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

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The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000

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