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Undergraduate Courses 2017
Applying through clearing?
Clearing applicants and others planning to start in 2016 should view Comparative Literature and Italian with a Year Abroad for 2016 entry.

Comparative Literature and Italian with a Year Abroad - BA (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

Comparative Literature broadens the study of literature to transcend national boundaries to consider works from other countries and cultures. Taking Comparative Literature alongside Italian, you are able to make use of your language skills and insights into Italian culture to study European literature in close detail.

You study texts ranging from Classical Antiquity to the present day in English translation, including works by such famous authors as Homer, Ovid, Shakespeare, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Balzac, Flaubert, Dickens, Proust and Kafka, as well as Italian classics such as Dante and Calvino.

Italy is a cornerstone in culture, art and history across Europe. By learning Italian, you give yourself a tool to explore this cultural richness and to open your eyes to its Roman heritage, the Renaissance, modern architecture, fashion and car design. Italian is spoken not only in its home country, but also by over 15 million people in Switzerland, North America and Australia.

Kent is an ideal location to study Italian. The majority of the Italian teaching staff are native speakers and we regularly host Italian exchange students, giving you the opportunity to immerse yourself in the language. This is supplemented by excellent technical facilities, including audio, video and computer-assisted language learning.

Between Stages 2 and 3, you spend a year studying or working abroad in Italy, which will greatly improve your language skills as well as allowing you to immerse yourself in and develop your understanding of Italian culture.

Studying on this joint honours, you gain expertise in a specific national tradition, making you able to compare the works of Italian authors to other European ones, and so benefitting from a international perspective on literary history, movements and genres. You also gain the language skills to prepare you for the global job market.

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2015, Comparative Literature at Kent was ranked 4th in the UK for student satisfaction and 96% of our students were satisfied with the quality of teaching on their course. 

In the National Student Survey 2015, 93% of Italian students were satisfied with the quality of teaching on their course. In The Complete University Guide 2016, Italian was ranked 1st for research quality.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

CP311 - The Tale (30 credits)

This literary-critical module deals with a wide range of selected international tales ranging from antiquity to the present day. The module addresses issues such as the development of oral folktales and fairytales into written forms, and discusses various short prose genres including Aesopian fables, myths, folktales and fairytales, as well as tales of the fantastic, 19th century art-tales and the modern short story.



The framework of discussion comprises a general survey of the issues that face the comparatist. In the course of the module students practice different methods of literary analysis, including close reading and comparative analysis by examining story-motifs and story-structures, and by considering symbolic meanings in the light of psychoanalytic concepts. Students also explore questions of transmission and transformation (e.g. how stories and motifs travel from one culture to another and alter in shape and emphasis) and questions of genre (for example the fantastic). A selection of critical texts on narrative devices and patterns, on psychoanalytical, structuralist and feminist approaches to the fairytale and on genre theories are studied in conjunction with the primary texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT312 - An Introduction to Italian Cinema: Neorealism and Its Legacy (15 credits)

This course will introduce the students to the work of some of the major Italian filmmakers who contributed to Neorealism's aesthetics and contents (Rossellini, De Sica, De Santis, Fellini) and those who have been inspired by them from the Fifties to the present. Through the study of the history of Italian cinema, students will become familiar with some of the most relevant issues of the history of Italian culture and society.



The course will focus particularly on some periods of the history of both Italian cinema and Italian society:

- The 1940s: Neorealism as a rejection of the fascist film industry ('Telefoni bianchi/White Telephones' and 'Calligrafi/Calligraphers') and as a way of representing Italian society in the years between the fall of fascism and the birth of the Italian Republic.

- The legacy of Neorealism in the Fifties: Fellini - the decline of Neorealism into the so-called Pink Neorealism during the years of 'Ricostruzione’ (Reconstruction) and the Cold War

- The legacy of Neorealism and its influence on Hollywood mainstream industry (with special focus on gangster films)

- The legacy of Neorealism on contemporary Italian cinema (e.g. Moretti, Sorrentino, Garrone).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT315 - An Introduction to Italian Modernity (15 credits)

This module aims to introduce students to Italian Literature and Culture through the centuries (from the Unification to the late XX century). Its principal objective will be to set representative works of a number of key Italian writers and intellectuals, such as: D'Annunzio, Montale, Ungaretti, Pasolini, Levi, and the Futurists, in their socio-historical and cultural background.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT301 - Learning Italian - Beginners (30 credits)

• This is an intensive module in Italian for students who have no or very little knowledge of the language.

• This course will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to widen their knowledge of Romance languages and to those intending to spend time in Italy.

• Key basic grammatical structures will be taught through the means of purpose-designed Italian language course books.

• The students will use the exercise book to carry out grammar exercises at home, which will then be corrected in class.

• The students will practice their aural skills by listening to audiotapes and videos both in and outside the class.

• Each chapter of the coursework book is theme based (travelling, shopping, family, etc.).

• The students will learn how to write and speak in Italian by acquiring new vocabulary, key grammatical points and by carrying out role-plays / presentations. All these aspects relate to the themes in the coursework book.

• A range of materials will be provided to the student and will for the basis for discussions, translations and applied exercises.

• Some cultural background of Italy will be provided (e.g. geography, art, music, culinary etc.)

• The students will also be expected to carry out simple translations from Italian to English / English to Italian. The texts provided will be extracted from the web or the coursework book itself. These translations will also relate to the themes covered in each chapter of the coursework book.

• By the end of the course the student will have covered key grammatical areas including: the present tense, the future, the gerund, and basic pronouns.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT308 - Learning Italian 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

The module is intended for students with an ‘A’ Level Italian (although Intermediate/GCSE/AS Level will be considered), and is aimed at consolidating students’ knowledge of written and spoken Italian, at strengthening their grammatical awareness of Italian and at practicing translation skills both from and into Italian. Students will develop skills to plan work, study independently and use relevant sources, as well as acquire a sophisticated knowledge of Italian through weekly exercises of translation, grammar and conversation. The module comprises three elements: one hour per week devoted to advanced Italian grammar, one devoted to translation from English into Italian and guided comprehension, and one hour of conversation practice with a native speaker Italian.



This module is subject to change, pending faculty approval.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP305 - Freedom and Oppression in Modern Literature (15 credits)

The twentieth-century imagination was marked by a spirit of doubt, especially of the Enlightenment faith in reason's capacity to advance mankind to happiness and freedom. In this module will be discussed some classic fictional explorations of freedom and social, political, religious and racial oppression which have had an international impact. These texts will be read as works of literature in their own right as well as contextualised with the ideas they question and propagate: universal happiness, human liberation, and morality without God, personal and political freedom, the self and its responsibility.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP306 - Guilt and Redemption in Modern Literature (15 credits)

The 'knowledge of good and evil' is unique to human beings. It informs the individual's conscience and determines the moral systems on which societies are based. The violation of moral codes is expected to induce the experience of guilt, while the lack of any sense of guilt is considered to be psychopathic. As the manifestation of an internal, and sometimes also external, struggle of varying intensity, guilt is an almost universal concern of literary texts; as is the quest for redemption, the alleviation of guilt and despair – through atonement, forgiveness or denial. In this module, we will analyse and discuss literary texts which explore the frequently fuzzy edges of the experiences of guilt and redemption as a human quandary and as perceived against changing conceptions of morality. Texts included in the reading list engage with questions of personal and collective guilt incurred with hubris, cruelty, the violation of animal rights, and genocide, etc.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP317 - Childhood & Adolesence in Modern Fiction (15 credits)

Who and what is 'a child', and what is adolescence? This module examines the representation of childhood and adolescence in a cross-section of texts from modern literature within the context of World Literature studies. Students will pay close attention to the rhetoric and techniques of storytelling woven around these themes, as well as to relevant socio-political debates, while also examining how these specific texts function across cultures.

The module encourages students to find innovative approaches to the topic, and at the same time invites them to explore the relationship between literature and childhood and the joy of reading often associated with childhood and adolescence.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP318 - Introduction to Contemporary European and Hispanic Cinemas (15 credits)

This module will introduce students to a wide range of films produced in different European and Latin American countries between the late 1980s and the present day. The module will focus on prevailing trends and dominant themes in contemporary European and Hispanic cinemas. The aim is to make students aware of the place which cinema has played and continues to play in the cultural life of Europe and Latin America, its importance in establishing national and supra-national identity, and the ways in which international relations are expressed through film production. The module will begin with an overview of European and Latin American cinema, and then will be divided into geographically determined sections (United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Poland, France, Italy, Spain, Mexico and Cuba) before being brought together again in the final conclusive lecture. The course is also designed to provide students with basic film terminology, as well as with basic tools for cultural analysis.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP319 - Post-War European Cinemas (15 credits)

The course will introduce students to the study of post-War European cinema and will contribute to student's historical, aesthetic and conceptual understanding of this cinema. The course will examine a number of the principal production and aesthetic trends of cinema in Europe from 1945 to the late 1970s. The main aim is to introduce students to the work and contexts of production of important European filmmakers from a range of national cinemas. Thus the module will look at Italian Neo-Realism, British Ealing comedy, Swedish cinema, French New Wave, New German cinema, and New Spanish Cinema. Among the topics of the course are: the notion of European 'art' cinema; the notion of the 'auteur'; European realism; the relationship between European cinema and Hollywood. Students will also become familiar with basic film terminology as well as with basic tools for cultural analysis.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP323 - The Romantic Movement (30 credits)

This module focuses on the development of the Romantic movement in Britain, France, Germany and Russia. It begins with the work of eighteenth century writers such as Goethe and Rousseau, and then explores their influence upon British, French and German writers of the early Romantic period (Blake, Chateaubriand, Kleist). The middle part of the module mainly concentrates upon British Romantic poetry, grouped around themes such as art, nature, politics and identity. The final part of the module examines how Russian writers, such as Lermontov and Pushkin, responded to the legacy of their Western counterparts. There will also be exploration during the course of the module of sub-genres such as the Gothic (Walpole, Dacre, M. Shelley), the historical novel (Dumas) and the confession (de Quincey). The work of painters, such as Fuseli, Goya and Turner, will be available as a resource via Moodle.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP324 - Classical Literature (15 credits)

This module offers students a wide-ranging grounding in classical literature as a basis for the further study of Western literature within a comparative framework. Major works of ancient Greek and Roman literature are studied in order to enable students to appreciate the literary engagement with the following in the classical world: myth (including the stories of the Trojan War, Oedipus, Jason and Medea, and the founding of Rome); the relationship between human beings and the gods, between the sexes, and between the human and the animal; and the journey motif. Themes explored included sexuality, violence, conceptions of justice, metamorphosis, and madness. The module introduces students to some of the major genres of Western literature (tragedy, comedy, the epic), and considers how these were theorized by Aristotle. It also encourages students to reflect on questions of cultural transmission, and on why the myths represented in classical literature should have proved to be such a rich source for the literature of the West.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP325 - World Literature:An Introduction (15 credits)

This module introduces students to some of the most influential theories of World Literature, which are studied alongside a selection of literary examples. The theories include Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's reflections formulated in the first decades of the nineteenth century. Goethe coined the term 'world literature' [Weltliteratur] to describe the international circulation and reception of literary works in Europe. In the course of the module, we reflect on the relationship between national literatures and world literature, and on the ways in which the literary market facilitates and complicates transnational exchanges of ideas. In addition, students are given the opportunity to hone their close reading skills by studying a selection of ancient and modern world creation myths. These include texts from the Near East, Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe. The module offers students the unique opportunity to analyse in detail different ways in which cultural backgrounds can shape literary productions, and how stories, motifs and themes travel across national boundaries. In the course of the module, we discuss key literary terms and concepts, including fictionality, literariness, translation, the canon, and the various modes of reception and circulation that shape our understanding of world literature.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

CP524 - Fiction and Power (30 credits)

This module looks at a group of politically inspired novels and films, some of which were produced under the totalitarian regimes which held sway in Europe between 1917 and 1989, others deal with Latin American political unrest, the Middle East conflict and the Islamic revolution in Iran. Most explore ways of challenging and subverting authoritarian power structures and of articulating a critique in what Bertolt Brecht called 'dark times'. But we will also focus on less obvious negotiations of fiction with power, especially with respect to the various forms of power to which these texts are subject and in which they participate. The approach is comparative in two senses as the texts range historically and culturally as well as across genres and language barriers (Arab, Czech, English, French, German, Italian, Polish, Russian and Spanish)

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP532 - Latin American Fiction (15 credits)

This course introduces students to the fiction (novels, novellas, and short stories) of some of the most influential twentieth- and twenty-first- century Latin American writers. The module ranges from Borges to the extraordinary literary phenomenon or explosion of the 'Boom generation', the post-Boom novel, and the recently acclaimed Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño (all studied in English translation). The course offers students the unique opportunity to study a fascinating corpus of literature celebrated for its creative innovation, fictional games, puzzles, labyrinths, fabulous and supernatural events, multiple storytellers, and magical realist writing. The course also addresses questions of gender, class, and social, cultural, and technological changes, as well as representations of identity, subjectivity, time, space, and landscape.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP533 - The Sonnet (15 credits)

Since its inception in the thirteenth century, the sonnet has proven to be one of the most enduring poetic forms in western literary history and beyond. Associated, since Petrarch, in particular with love poetry, more recent transformations of the sonnet have not only explored new thematic ground but have continued a constant process of experimentation and innovation within the formal constraints of the genre. In this module, the poetic form of the sonnet will be explored from its very beginnings to the present day. Moreover, sonnet cycles, such as Shakespeare's or Rilke’s, will be studied as examples of the thematically guided expansion of the form. In addition to the printed poetic texts, attention will also be given (where applicable) to their artistic transformation in the visual arts, performance, and music. Sonnets to be studied will include samples by poets such as Petrarch, Ronsard, Michelangelo, Shakespeare, Gryphius, Lermontov, Borges, and Rilke as well as lesser known and more unconventional poems.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP534 - Modern Arabic Literature and the Middle East (15 credits)

The module introduces students to one of the richest and most stimulating eras of Arabic literary innovation and aims to link literary processes of transformation to current political changes. Exploring how recent Arabic fiction prefigures the 2011 Arab Spring revolution, the module offers students the opportunity to study these works in English translation by analysing creative trends and movements that currently resonate around the region. In addition, the module explores how these emerging Arab voices negotiate links to the past in relation to texts such as The Thousand and One Nights. The module combines the methodological approaches of comparative literature, the sociology of literature and postcolonial theory and explores concepts such as cultural identity, gender, diaspora and historiography.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP510 - The Text: Approaches to Comparative Literature (30 credits)

The module covers a variety of exercises from the close reading of poetic texts to the appraisal of a range of theoretical writings. Most material is drawn from European writing of the past two centuries, though the Bible and some medieval and Renaissance texts are also studied. Topics include: the holy text; the literary text; genre; poetic form; the fantastic; the avant-garde; postmodernism; text and image; psychoanalytic readings; and deconstruction.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP627 - Science Fiction: History and Innovation (30 credits)

This module examines the development of science fiction from the second half of the nineteenth century to its current global status in both serious and popular culture. It explores how science fiction has developed via the interaction of different genres, different media and different national cultures. The module begins with the work of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells since their fiction is at the root of international variants of science fiction. Special attention will be paid to the comparative analysis of science fiction from the Americas, Western and Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union. Consideration will also be given to the relationship of literature to film, especially surrounding topics such as aliens and alienation, genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, dystopia and apocalypse.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP629 - Rethinking Gender: From the Bronte Sisters toEimear McBride (30 credits)

This module investigates the representation of love, desire and the body in a selection of texts by women writers from different temporal, cultural and linguistic backgrounds. In particular we will look at the way representations of love, desire and the body reflect the respective socio-cultural contexts and the situation of women therein, how these writers deal with themes such as love, desire and eroticism, and what aesthetic strategies they use to tackle them. What models of feminine behaviour are celebrated or criticised? To what extent are relevant representational conventions adhered to or transgressed in these works?

Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre for example provides a complex representation of a split and conflicted female identity, torn between demands of the body, passions, rages and desires, and the demands of the mind, the spirit and the intellect. This conflict is externalised in the form of the characters Bertha Mason and Helen Burns, alter egos which Jane has to overcome and reconcile. Jane Eyre will offer a useful touchstone for other representations of female figures caught between social conventions and desires, and their attempts to come to terms with them.

Students will be asked to engage with the siginificance of images and representations of women proliferated through literature. These representations provide or question role models, perpetuate or problematise stereotypical versions of feminine goals and aspirations. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on close readings of the various works, and students will be asked to pay close attention to cultural differences and variations, and to examine how the conceptions and representations of love and desire changed in the course of time.

The selected fictions allow a comparative examination of a wide range of different perceptions by women writers of the body, of gender, identity, love, desire and sexuality and the way these reflect the respective wider ideological framework. Close readings of these texts are complemented by selected references to a body of feminist literary theory.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP644 - Creatures of the Night: Vampires in Literature and Film (15 credits)

This module introduces students to a range of nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century literary and cinematic representations of vampires from different cultural backgrounds. It explores the reasons for the abiding allure of the figure of the vampire both in popular culture and in literary fiction. The module examines the ways in which vampires function as polyvalent symbols of specifically modern preoccupations, for the emergence and popularity of vampire tales is intricately bound up with the advent and wider cultural ramifications of modernity. What do vampires represent in each of the works discussed, and what hidden desires and anxieties do they allow authors and filmmakers to express? The vampire is an allegorically highly potent figure which is suspended between life and death and between animal and human existence. Vampires frequently serve as foils to discuss more contentious matters, in particular questions relating to sexuality, gender roles, class, immortality and the desire for everlasting youth, being an outsider, and addiction. Texts and films to be studied include John Polidori’s The Vampyre (1819), Théophile Gautier’s Clarimonde (1836), J. Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla (1872), Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897), F. W. Murnau’s and Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu adaptations (1922 and 1979), Angela Carter’s The Lady of the House of Love (1979), Neil Jordan’s Interview with the Vampire (1994) and Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight (2005)

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP646 - Prize Winners (15 credits)

The award of literary prizes is a highly potent tool of cultural policy that frequently determines the wider national and international impact of a literary work. As such it is of crucial relevance to the study of comparative literature in a number of ways: the award of literary prizes reflects the beginnings of the successful or, as the case may be, the (ultimately) abortive formation of literary canons; moreover, it affords insights into processes of cultural production and marketing and reveals in which ways political and economic agendas are tied up with these processes; it also offers a perspective on transnational and transcultural aspects of the production and reception of literature and indicates shifting notions of the social function of literature and the writer; literature is thus understood as a cultural product in ever changing contexts which is frequently subject to external forces of which literary prizes become indicators or even 'enforcers'. This module will investigate with the methods of literary and cultural studies the development of a number of major literary awards which have achieved global significance, among them the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Man Booker Prize the Prix Goncourt (This list may be modified according to precedent to accommodate the topical relevance of individual award winners in the future.) Seminars will develop a historical perspective by scrutinising and analysing award winners of the past and their most recent counterparts in their different production and marketing contexts as well as in changing reception contexts: seminars will include the close reading of individual works as well as their critical reception, and the analysis of marketing strategies in various media (e.g. reports in culture magazines, reviews, displays in book shops, translations, etc.); final winners will be interpreted in the context of the respective long and short lists from which they emerged; historical developments will be taken into account, for instance by investigating 'forgotten' prize winners in comparison with those who, largely through the agency of academic intervention, 'made it' into the canon; the module thus also offers an insight into the history of the discipline of literary studies. (It links up logically with the C-level module CP321 Literature and Nationhood)

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT563 - Learning Italian 4 (Advanced) (30 credits)

IT563 is an intermediate level module. Its aims are to strengthen and widen the linguistic knowledge in the Stage 1 IT308 module, to consolidate students’ vocabulary and improve their knowledge of written and spoken Italian through immersion in a variety of texts, and to practise translation skills both from and into Italian. IT563, like IT308, is an intensive course which requires serious commitment.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT508 - Learning Italian 2 (Intermediate) (30 credits)

This module has been planned as the natural follow-on for those who have recently, successfully taken a beginners Italian course such as IT301, and who should have covered the basics of grammar, acquired a stock of high frequency vocabulary and reached a degree of proficiency beyond GCSE and approaching A-level. (A2-B1 in terms of the Common European Framework of Reference {CEFR}).



At the same time the course is designed to prepare students for their third year studies and exams in Italy. IT508, like IT301, is an intensive course which requires serious commitment.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT542 - Italian Extended Essay (15 credits)

This will depend on the subject matter and the advice of the supervisor. The subject will be broadly within the field of Italian Studies.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT552 - Italian Short Story (15 credits)

This module focuses on a number of Italian contemporary short stories. More specifically, it discusses the literary treatment of love, and the love story, in the short stories of some of the most important Italian writers of the second half of the 20th century and early 21st century. Works by worldwide renowned authors such as Italo Calvino, Natalia Ginzburg, Cesare Pavese and Leonardo Sciascia, accomplished "postmodernist" writers belonging to a younger generation such as Antonio Tabucchi and Pier Vittorio Tondelli, as well as less celebrated authors such as Gianni Celati, Erri De Luca and Fabrizia Ramondino will be taken into consideration. While not underestimating the profound economic, social and political changes that Italy underwent during the last sixty years, particular emphasis will be given to the similar way in which all these writers seem to fictionally conceive of the love relationship as a missed encounter. In spite of the manifold forms of love being described in these texts (between husband and wife; wife and lover; young boy and ideal father; sister and brother; mother and daughter; two young men, etc.), all the short stories chronologically analysed in this module seem to rely on Calvino's provoking suggestion according to which the missed encounter is the "fundamental element" of love relationships.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT556 - Catching the Tide: Cultural Renewal in 20th Century Italy (15 credits)

Despite her incomparable heritage, Italy experienced for many centuries a sense of cultural provincialism, with the world's intellectual curiosity switching to Paris, London, New York and other centres of innovation. This module focuses on the clear connections between rapid socio-economic and socio-political change and the thrust for cultural modernity that made 20th century Italy once more a key contributor to the literary and visual arts in Europe and beyond. A wide variety of Italian "texts" of the first seventy years of the 20th century will be taken into consideration, including novels, plays, short stories and films.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT576 - The Make-Up: Representations of Gender in Contemporary Italy (15 credits)

This module introduces students to key concepts in the analysis of social, cultural and artistic representation of gender within the context of contemporary Italy (from Fascism to the present). It does so by considering a selection of relevant works from a variety of media, such as, for instance, neorealist and fantastic literature of the post-war years; feminist writings of the 1970s (e.g. Dacia Maraini's novel Donna in Guerra, 1975); contemporary cinema (e.g. Ferzan Ozpetek’s Le fate ignoranti, 2001; Donatella Maiorca’s Viola di mare, 2009). The module takes as its focus the gendered basis of social and political control as evident in constructions of subjectivity and sexuality exercised – for instance – through the media, while also analysing works that present themselves as a reaction to such control.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Year abroad

The University of Kent has Erasmus agreements with several universities in Italy. See Study Abroad A - Z countries and courses.

Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

IT506 - Learning Italian 5 (30 credits)

This module is designed primarily for final year students of Italian who have studied or worked in Italy. Familiarity with the language, as spoken and written at professional level –for example in journalism or literature - is expected, together with a well-stocked vocabulary, a reasonable command of idiom in common use and a sense of linguistic appropriateness to context.



Students engage in the following activities throughout the year:

• translation from Italian into English, using a range of registers and topics

• translation from English into Italian, using journalistic and literary texts

• study grammatical and lexical subtleties of the Italian language

• group discussion on specific topics

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP647 - Prize Winners (15 credits)

The award of literary prizes is a highly potent tool of cultural policy that frequently determines the wider national and international impact of a literary work. As such it is of crucial relevance to the study of comparative literature in a number of ways: the award of literary prizes reflects the beginnings of the successful or, as the case may be, the (ultimately) abortive formation of literary canons; moreover, it affords insights into processes of cultural production and marketing and reveals in which ways political and economic agendas are tied up with these processes; it also offers a perspective on transnational and transcultural aspects of the production and reception of literature and indicates shifting notions of the social function of literature and the writer; literature is thus understood as a cultural product in ever changing contexts which is frequently subject to external forces of which literary prizes become indicators or even 'enforcers'. This module will investigate with the methods of literary and cultural studies the development of a number of major literary awards which have achieved global significance, among them the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Man Booker Prize the Prix Goncourt (This list may be modified according to precedent to accommodate the topical relevance of individual award winners in the future.) Seminars will develop a historical perspective by scrutinising and analysing award winners of the past and their most recent counterparts in their different production and marketing contexts as well as in changing reception contexts: seminars will include the close reading of individual works as well as their critical reception, and the analysis of marketing strategies in various media (e.g. reports in culture magazines, reviews, displays in book shops, translations, etc.); final winners will be interpreted in the context of the respective long and short lists from which they emerged; historical developments will be taken into account, for instance by investigating 'forgotten' prize winners in comparison with those who, largely through the agency of academic intervention, 'made it' into the canon; the module thus also offers an insight into the history of the discipline of literary studies. (It links up logically with the C-level module CP321 Literature and Nationhood)

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP652 - Postcolonial Images of Africa and South Asia (15 credits)

This is a module about the intersection of colonial power relations, anti-colonialism, postcolonialism, feminism, and identity politics in literature from 1940 to 2010 which interrogates the influence of imperialism on a sense of self. It considers the writing of a number of women and men from Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, India and Sri Lanka in a range of genres from the Francophone and Anglophone traditions (short story, essay, novel, autobiography). In light of the complex relationship between coloniser and colonised, we consider the political activism of many of these writers, as well as the ways in which their politics are articulated in their writing, whether fiction or non-fiction. We also examine to what extent this literature is representative of other postcolonial concerns such as nationhood and national consciousness, hybridity and assimilation, and exile and alienation within the larger context of cultural theory. Particularly significant is our interrogation of the violence inscribed in both the colonial system and the colonised’s fight for independence as seen from the psychoanalytical perspectives of Frantz Fanon in Black Skin, White Masks (1952), A Dying Colonialism (1959), The Wretched of the Earth (1961). Studying the primary and secondary texts in English, we bring awareness to the reading scene of the translation process as an important development in the transnational study of comparative literature in our global world. In so Doing, we acknowledge the significance of indigenous languages and dialects as signifers of subjecthood in conflict with the coloniser’s language. By exploring a variety of anti-colonial resistance and liberation discourses in relation to the development of current postcolonial thinking, the module also offers and insight into the history of the discipline of Colonial and Postcolonial studies. This module links up logically with the C-level module CP321 Literature and Nationhood (relationship between a sense of nationhood and writing), the I-level module CP510 The Text (as a corollary to the analysis of different reading perspectives), and the postgraduate level CP806 Postcolonial Cultures as part of the Taught MA Programme.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP655 - Don Juan and Casanova: The Art of Seduction in Literature - Music and F (15 credits)

Don Juan and Casanova are archetypes of the male seducer who, in the Western European tradition, stand for different interpretations of excessive passion. Don Juan hunts for virgins, nuns, and other women who are difficult to get (in that they belong to other men). Meticulously, he keeps record of his conquests. Casanova, in turn, was attracted to the easy accessibility of moments of intense pleasure, which, although within potential reach to all, only few knew how to enjoy. While Casanova slept with everyone but took interest in nobody, Don Juan's quest is also motivated by the hidden desire to find a woman that would be his equal. In this module we shall chart the metamorphoses of these two almost mythical figures since their emergence in seventeenth-century Spain and eighteenth-century Italy to explore the relationship between literature, music, film, and the erotic within different cultural and historical contexts. In our close analyses of plays, novellas, poems, philosophical texts, opera, and film, we will focus on notions of modern individualism in relation to narcissism and solitude. In addition, we shall also engage with theoretical concepts related to speech act theory (J.L. Austin’s How to do Things with Words), Judith Butler’s thoughts on gender as performance, Sigmund Freud’s observations on sexuality, and Jacques Lacan’s description of ego-constitution.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP656 - Shakespeare's Afterlives (15 credits)

How have twentieth-century writers across the world negotiated and appropriated Shakespeare’s omnipresent cultural influence? How have they revised, reinvented, and reimagined his legacy in Europe, Asia, and the Americas (North, Central, and South)? This module focuses on a selection of Shakespeare’s most influential plays (Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Tempest) in order to examine how their thematic, historical, and cultural concerns have been transplanted to a wide range of global locations including the Caribbean, Germany, Japan, a farm in the USA, and the Argentine Pampas. The module also engages with theoretical notions related to the act of appropriating Shakespeare, including the theory of intertextuality, the Benjaminian concept of the ‘afterlife’ of a text, and Genette’s study of the ‘palimpsest’ as a text derived from a pre-existent text. In addition, the module will reflect on issues of race, gender, and cultural identity embedded in the adaptations of the bard in the various world contexts in which his work has been complexly modernized and redeployed.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP658 - Nordic Literature and Film (30 credits)

This module examines literary works ranging from folk tales and sagas through the respective periods of national Romanticism to the present day written in the principal Nordic languages (Danish, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish), and will also explore some films from the region. The texts will be studied in English translations, and the films will be in the original language with English subtitles. Some of the themes to be extracted from these texts and explored in more detail include: Romanticism, exile, nationalism and post-nationalism, world literatures, translation and adaptation. The current new wave of Nordic crime fiction and its adaptations as TV dramas and films will also be examined, exploring reasons for the genre’s popularity (both within and beyond the region). The module will investigate how Nordic literature and film have developed diachronically, how the literatures of the various Nordic countries interact and interrelate, and how contemporary texts are rewriting and renegotiating the historical linguistic, geographic, ethnic and cultural borders of the region.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP659 - Comparative Literature and English & Linguistics in the Classroom (30 credits)

This module will provide the opportunity for third year undergraduates to gain valuable transferable skills by giving them some first-hand teaching experience in a primary or secondary school classroom. Each student will spend half a day each week for one term in a local school under the supervision of a specific teacher, who will act as a mentor, and decide the tasks and responsibilities of the student. The weekly university sessions and school work will complement each other. Therefore, attendance to university sessions is crucial as it will also give the students the opportunity to discuss aspects related to their weekly placement and receive guidance.



They will observe sessions taught by their designated teacher and possibly other teachers. Initially, for these sessions the students will concentrate on specific aspects of the teachers' tasks, and their approach to teaching a whole class. As they progress, their role will be as teaching assistants, by helping individual pupils who are having difficulties or by working with small groups. They may teach brief or whole sessions with the whole class or with a small group of students where they explain a topic related to the school syllabus. They may also talk about aspects of University life. They must keep a weekly journal reflecting on their activities at their designated school.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP641 - SWIPE Undergraduate Conference (15 credits)

The SWIPE (Student Work-in-Progress Exposition) undergraduate conference module is designed particularly for undergraduate students working on their final-year dissertations or other extended coursework, but is open to all third year students. The conference will provide students with an opportunity to conduct independent research. In addition, it will give them a chance to discuss their and their fellow students’ work and to test some of their ideas in a larger context. The conference aims to foster the ongoing academic dialogue within Comparative Literature, the disciplines joined in LLB and the School of European Culture and Languages as a whole as well as with the larger scholarly community of the University of Kent at Canterbury and its other campuses. By giving students an opportunity of being introduced to, and partaking in, one of the prevalent forms of professional academic dialogue, the SWIPE conference is designed as a preparation for students’ further participation in exciting academic debates and to invite them to consider the challenges and opportunities of postgraduate studies. At the same time, it will serve to hone transferable skills useful in students’ professional careers in other sectors of public life (organisation, presentation, communication and the demonstration of self-confidence). To ensure a certain thematic coherence and provide students with some orientation while still leaving them a wide-ranging spectrum of thematic concerns from which to choose their subjects, a specific, but not limiting, conference title will be chosen every year (to be advertised in the current stage 2 and 3 handbooks). Titles like “Violence”, “Love”, “Death”, “Silence” or “Resistance” are envisaged. Students’ participation will not be limited to the six workshops and the presentation of their paper but will also include the complete organisation of the conference; with respect to the latter, the module convenor’s role is restricted to giving guidance, advice and, whenever necessary, help.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP518 - The Book and the Film: Adaptation and Interpretation (30 credits)

This module seeks to explore how novels and plays are adapted and interpreted for the screen. We shall be looking at how certain texts lend themselves to multiple reshaping such as Laclos’ 'Dangerous Liasions' and Henry James’ 'The Turn of the Screw', both of which have been adapted for the screen more than once. We shall also analyse lesser known works that have gone on to become feature films, such as Arthur Schnitzler’s short work ‘Dream Story’, filmed as 'Eyes Wide Shut'. Adaptations directed by widely recognised filmmakers such as De Sica, Max Ophuls, Kubrick and Pier Paolo Pasolini will also be examined with a view to eliciting and understanding their particular approach to, and filmic vision of, written texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP594 - Travel Literature (30 credits)

Everybody travels, in one way or another. This module asks what it means to ‘travel’. In doing so, it addresses fundamental concerns, such as identity, foreignness, time, home, gender, power and ethics. By looking at texts from a wide range of periods and places, it will consider how these might be compared in their treatments of the shared theme of ‘travel’. It will also address the ways in which this theme affects and is affected by the genre of writing.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP609 - Modernism and the European Avant-Garde (30 credits)

The module will begin with the study of some of the major avant-garde movements (including Expressionism, Futurism, Imagism, Vorticism, Dada, and Surrealism) that sprang up in the first two decades of the twentieth century. Students will read a range of short manifestos and literary works by Tristan Tzara, Filippo Marinetti, T. E. Hulme, Wyndham Lewis, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, André Breton, and others. Once both the diversity and the international nature of modernism have been considered, students will go on to look in depth at a series of major modernist writers from different national backgrounds, and to identify what these writers share, what distinguishes them from one another, and, in some cases, what sets them in violent opposition. The aim here will be to give students a sense of the plurality of modernisms and the conflicts that were internal to the movement. Although the focus will be on some of the most significant individual works of modernist literature (for instance, Proust’s Swann’s Way, Kafka’s The Trial, Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Eliot’s The Waste Land), shorter texts, both literary and critical/theoretical, will also constitute the recommended reading in preparation for seminars. Seminal essays by major commentators on the modernist movement such as Walter Benjamin, Georg Lukács, and Theodor Adorno will constitute part of the primary reading. The aim throughout will be to strike a balance between close reading and the consideration of the more general theoretical and political issues at stake in the modernist ‘revolution of the word’. Students will also be encouraged to explore the ways in which modernism finds expression in the visual arts, particularly in Expressionism, Cubism, and Abstraction.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP502 - Fiction and Power (30 credits)

This module looks at a group of politically inspired literary texts, comics and films, some of which were produced under the totalitarian regimes which held sway in Europe between 1917 and 1989. Others deal with the Middle East conflict, and the Islamic revolution in Iran and Mao's Cultural Revolution in China, or power relations in other contexts. Most explore ways of challenging and subverting authoritarian power structures and of articulating a critique in what Bertolt Brecht called 'dark times'. But we also focus on less obvious negotiations of fiction and power, especially with respect to the various forms of power to which these texts are subject, in which they participate, and on which they reflect metafictionally. The approach is comparative in various ways as the texts range historically and culturally, as well as across genres and language barriers (Arab, Czech, English, French, German, Italian, Greek, Polish, Russian and Chinese)

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT572 - Modern Italian Poetry: Nature, Eroticism and Poetics (15 credits)

The course examines the work of four key Italian authors that in different ways prefigured or defined the 'modern shift' of Italian poetry: Giacomo Leopardi, Giovanni Pascoli, Gabriele D’Annunzio, and Eugenio Montale. In reading each of these authors, the module focuses on the following main issues: the relationship between subjectivity and otherness; the representation of nature, landscape, and space; different forms of eroticism; the notion of poetry itself and, finally the ways in which all these elements are interconnected not only within the analysed texts but also within the broader tapestry of the modern Italian poetic discourse. Texts to be studied include: Leopardi’s Canti; Pascoli’s Myricae and Canti di Castelvecchio; D’Annunzio’s Alcyone, Intermezzo di Rime and Poema Paradisiaco; Montale’s Ossi di Seppia

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT575 - Approaches to Criticism: Reading Antonio Tabucchi (15 credits)

In his Elogio della letteratura (2009) the Italian writer Antonio Tabucchi affirms that the responsibility to write arises from the urgency of pursuing meaning in our daily existence. In literature's ability to question, estrange and demystify pre-existing power discourses and relations we find a unique potentiality for contestation, freedom and truth. Still, what is the sense of a literary text? How does it demand to be read? To what extent can it be relevant for our everyday reality? This module intends to investigate and develop a deep awareness of the different ways in which it is possible to critically approach a work of literature. Contextually, it aims at enhancing the students’ response to fictional writings with specific reference to their socio-political and cultural frame. By means of a close reading of Tabucchi’s texts and an analytical assessment of the scholarly reception of his opus, students will become familiar with the narrations of some of the most controversial episodes in Italian post-war history (such as the resistance and the 'years of lead’ through postmodernity and the contemporary scenario), while exploring the manifold modalities in which a literary text can speak to us.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT577 - Italian Regional Cinema (15 credits)

This course complicates the notion that there is a unifying concept of an Italian national cinema.

Specifically, it will examine particular instances of filmic production operating outside of the national and cinematic capital of Rome, examining both the factors determining and constraining the emergence of such filmmaking practices, and the ways in which the films they produce may differ from those produced in the capital and associated with an Italian national cinema.

To achieve this, the module will focus on a number of case studies, such as:

• The cinema of Naples, analysed in relation to the question of Neapolitan identity and cultural difference.

• The cinema of Turin, as a product of deliberate regional funding and cultural heritage strategies.

• The cinema of Sicily, seen in relation to the problematising of cultural stereotypes.

• How certain 'national' film productions have dealt with the problematic notion of Italian national/regional identity.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SCL502 - Languages in the Classroom (30 credits)

The student will spend one half-day per week for ten weeks in a school. Students will work in a school, with a nominated teacher, for ten half days during the Spring Term and will have the opportunity to promote their subject in a variety of ways. The Course Convenor will place students in appropriate schools, either primary or secondary. They will observe sessions taught by their designated teacher and possibly other teachers. They will act to some extent in the role of a teaching assistant, by helping individual pupils who are having difficulties or by working with small groups. They may take 'hotspots': brief sessions with the whole class where they explain a language topic or talk about aspects of University life. They must keep a weekly journal reflecting on their activities at their designated school. The university sessions and weekly school work will complement each other. Therefore, attendance to university sessions is crucial as it will also give the students the opportunity to discuss aspects related to their weekly placement and receive guidance.



Some travel may be required by students taking this module. In this instance, it should be noted that the University is unable to cover the cost of any such journey.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT503 - Italian Dissertation (30 credits)

This module may only be taken provided that other Italian non-language units are being followed throughout the final year. The subject of the Essay will be agreed between the student and a supervisor appointed by the Section; it will normally arise from work done either in other Stage 2 and 3 modules or during the year abroad, but other topics are not necessarily excluded. It will be based on the student’s own research under the guidance of a supervisor.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage

Teaching & Assessment

Comparative Literature

For most modules, you have one two-hour seminar per week. The Final-Year Dissertation is based entirely on your private research but is supervised by a tutor and includes workshops and the chance to participate in an undergraduate conference. Assessment varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework, usually in the ratio 50:50 or 40:60.

Comparative Literature students can also choose to take a module that is linked to our SWIPE (Student Work in Progress Exposition) conference. SWIPE is an annual one-day conference organised by Comparative Literature students: it is a platform for our third-year students who give 15-minute presentations on their final-year dissertation projects. SWIPE is a fantastic experience for students, as they learn everything about planning, organising and running a conference, as well as about the art of preparing and giving professional conference presentations. For more information on SWIPE, please consult our website: www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/swipe.html

We also offer a module designed specifically for students who are planning to embark on a career in teaching: Comparative Literature and English & Linguistics in the Classroom.

Italian

Teaching is by lectures and seminars. We have extensive technical facilities, including three satellite TV channels, video and DVDs and computer-assisted language learning.

Depending on the modules you select, assessment throughout all stages of the course varies from 100% coursework, to a combination of examination and coursework, in the ratio 50:50, 60:40, 70:30 or 80:20.

The School of European Culture and Languages, to which Italian and Comparative Literature belong, has secured two paid work placements at Fondazione CRT for students of Italian studies at Kent. The placements involve either teaching English at the University of Turin or working at Fondazione CRT on projects including translation, research and correspondence with international organisations.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • promote the study of literature within a strongly multidisciplinary and modular context
  • widen participation in higher education by offering a wide variety of study routes
  • produce graduates with a good knowledge of a comprehensive range of literary works from across Europe and beyond, from the Classics to the present day
  • teach the comparatist approach to literary studies
  • produce intellectually independent, self-motivated graduates who are able to approach any text in a critical and analytical manner
  • equip students with the skills and abilities generic to study in the humanities
  • provide a basis for the study of literature and related disciplines at a higher level
  • offer students the opportunity to develop more general skills and competences so that they can respond positively to the challenges of the workplace or of postgraduate education.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • a wide range of authors and texts from different periods and cultures, from Ancient Greece to the present day
  • the cultural and historical contexts in which literature is written, transmitted and read
  • concepts such as ‘genre’, ‘theme’ or ‘literary movement’
  • the problems inherent in interpreting ‘the translated text’
  • traditions in literary criticism
  • critical theory and its applications, understood within its historical contexts
  • the study of literature in its relation to other disciplines.

Intellectual skills

You gain the following intellectual abilities:

  • listen to and absorb the oral transmission of complicated data
  • careful reading of literary works and theoretical material
  • reflect clearly and critically on oral and written sources, using power of analysis and imagination
  • marshal a complex body of information
  • remember relevant material and recall it when needed
  • construct cogent arguments
  • forrmulate independent ideas and defend them in a plausible manner
  • present arguments in written form in a time-limited context, such as examinations.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in the following:

  • the close critical analysis of literary texts
  • informed critical understanding of the variety of critical and theoretical approaches to the study of literature
  • the ability to articulate knowledge and understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to literary studies
  • sensitivity to generic conventions in the study of literature and the problems of translation and cultural differences
  • well-developed language use and awareness, including a grasp of standard critical terminology
  • the ability to articulate responsiveness to literary language
  • scholarly practice in the presentation of formal written work, in particular bibliographic and annotational
  • understanding of how cultural norms, assumptions and practices influence questions of judgement
  • an appreciation of the value of collaborative intellectual work in developing critical judgement.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following:

  • communication: produce focused and cogent written presentations, summarise information and assess arguments, give oral presentations, using visual aids where appropriate
  • problem-solving, identify problems, assess the strengths and weaknesses of different solutions and defend the preferred solutions with cogent arguments
  • improve your learning, identify your strengths and weaknesses, assess the quality of your own work, manage your time and meet deadlines, and learn to work independently
  • work with others, participate in seminar discussions, respond to the views of others and to criticisms of your own views without giving or taking offence, engage in independent group work, including the preparation of group presentations
  • IT abilities, inc using online information sources receiving.

Careers

Studying Comparative Literature and Italian you learn to think critically, develop the skills of close reading and effective communication, and gain confidence and experience in expressing your ideas. These key transferable skills are essential for graduates as they move into the job market. In addition, your ability to speak another European language is a key asset in the global employment market, and many employers view a graduate with overseas study experience as significantly more employable.

Our graduates have found jobs in diverse areas including journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching, as well as in banking, marketing analysis and project management. A significant percentage of our students pursue further study for postgraduate qualifications.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

ABB

GCSE

C in a related language

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 16 at HL including a modern European language other than English 4 at HL or 5 at SL

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised. However, details of our proposed funding opportunities for 2016 entry can be found on our funding page.  

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. Details of the scholarship for 2017 entry have not yet been finalised. However, for 2016 entry, the scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages. Please review the eligibility criteria on that page. 

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £13810

As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

The University of Kent intends to increase its regulated full-time tuition fees for all Home and EU undergraduates starting in September 2017 from £9,000 to £9,250. This is subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise by 2.8%.

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

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The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000