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Undergraduate Courses 2017
Applying through clearing?
Clearing applicants and others planning to start in 2016 should view Computing and Business Administration with a Year in Industry for 2016 entry.

Computing and Business Administration with a Year in Industry - BSc (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

Studying Business Administration you gain the  skills and knowledge essential for managing  key areas of organisations: accounting, human resource management, quantitative methods, marketing, strategy, and operations management. In addition, it gives you the choice of following specialist options, such as entrepreneurship, or spending a year working in industry.

Graduates who can combine this knowledge with a thorough understanding of the application of computing to business situations are in great demand. We ensure our students are equipped with the skills and knowledge that make them highly attractive to potential employers. The employability levels and starting salaries of our graduates are testament to our success in achieving this.

On this programme, you do a Year in Industry. This gives you work experience, a salary and the possibility of a job with the same company after graduation. The Kent IT Consultancy option offers the opportunity to learn how to become an IT Consultant by providing computing support to local businesses while earning credits towards your degree.

The School of Computing is an internationally recognised Centre of Excellence for programming education, with 95% of our research judged to be of international quality. The School is also home to two National Teaching Fellows, authors of widely used textbooks and award-winning Java teaching systems such as BlueJ and Greenfoot.

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2015, 87% of School of Computing students were satisfied with the overall quality of their course.

The School of Computing at Kent is ranked 3rd in the UK for graduate prospects in The Guardian University Guide 2016, and, in the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey*, 96% of students had found employment or gone on to further study within six months of graduating in 2014.

Business studies was ranked 5th in the UK for student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015. In The Complete University Guide 2016, business and management was ranked 2nd in the south-east for overall performance.  

*conducted by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA)

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

CB302 - Managers and Organisations (15 credits)

The main strand of the lecture material will establish the foundations of organisational behaviour in the context of the historical development of ideas and theory. The theories will be related to practical examples and thence students will be introduced to modern experience, practice and scholarship. Once the information of the foundation of organisational behaviour is established, at the next level, contemporary topics of management will be touched upon briefly. This will provide students with basic knowledge related to modern management practices. The content of the module will, therefore, be based on the following topics:



• Scientific Management

• Human Relations School

• Bureaucracy

• Post Bureaucratic Organizations

• Contingency Approach

• Group and teams

• Motivation

• Power and authority

• Managing diversity

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB364 - Business Analysis Tools (15 credits)

An indicative set of topics to be covered within the module are outlined below:



Basic Spreadsheet Functionalities: Introduction to common spreadsheet features: workbooks, worsksheets, menus, cells, rows, columns, data types, relative and absolute cell sddressing, copying, basic formulae, naming cells, formatting, charts and graphs, printing.



Data Management Facilities: sorting, filtering, data forms, pivot tables.



What-if Analysis: scenario manager, goal seek, data tables.



Basic Financial Analysis: Introduction to basic financial analysis and how to carry this out using spreadsheets: compound interest, discounting, NPV, IRR, loans and mortages.



Forecasting: simple time-series forecasting using spreadsheets.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB369 - Financial Accounting, Reporting and Analysis (15 credits)

The module will begin with an introduction to the link between business and accounting in order to show the value to the students of their having some knowledge of accounting. The module is designed to teach students how to prepare, read and interpret financial information with a view to their being future business managers rather than accountants.

The module will continue with a brief demonstration of double-entry bookkeeping. Students will not be examined on this, it is merely to put bookkeeping and accounting in context. Following on from this, students will be shown how to prepare financial statements from a trial balance and make adjustments to the figures given by acting on information given in a short scenario.

The regulatory framework of financial reporting will be considered as will the annual reports and accounts of a variety of organisations. The module will finish will an analysis of financial statements with students shown how to interpret data and make sensible recommendations

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB370 - Introduction to Marketing (15 credits)

A synopsis of the curriculum

The module introduces to students the importance of marketing in competitive and dynamic environments.

The key topics of the module are:

• The marketing concept

• The marketing environment

• Market segmentation & targeting

• Brand development and management

• Management of the marketing mix

o Product; including new product development and the marketing of services

o Pricing

o Promotion; including digital media, advertising, sales promotion, publicity, PR, personal sales et al.

o Place

o Extended marketing mix; including people, physical evidence and process

• Ethical issues in marketing

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO320 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to object-oriented software development. Software pervades many aspects of most professional fields and sciences, and an understanding of the development of software applications is useful as a basis for many disciplines. This module covers the development of simple software systems. Students will gain an understanding of the software development process, and learn to design and implement applications in a popular object-oriented programming language. Fundamentals of classes and objects are introduced, and key features of class descriptions: constructors, methods and fields. Method implementation through assignment, selection control structures, iterative control structures and other statements is introduced. Collection objects are also covered and the availability of library classes as building blocks. Throughout the course, the quality of class design and the need for a professional approach to software development is emphasized

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO323 - Databases and the Web (15 credits)

• An introduction to databases and SQL, focussing on their use as a source for content for websites.

• Creating static content for websites using HTML(5) and controlling their appearance using CSS.

• Using PHP to integrate static and dynamic content for web sites.

• Securing dynamic websites.

• Using Javascript to improve interactivity and maintainability in web content.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO328 - Human Computer Interaction (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to human-computer interaction. Fundamental aspects of human physiology and psychology are introduced and key features of interaction and common interaction styles delineated. A variety of analysis and design methods are introduced (e.g. GOMS. heuristic evaluation, user-centred and contextual design techniques). Throughout the course, the quality of design and the need for a professional, integrated and user-centred approach to interface development is emphasised. Rapid and low-fidelity prototyping feature as one aspect of this.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO520 - Further Object-Oriented Programming (15 credits)

This module builds on the foundation of object-oriented design and implementation found in module CO320 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming to provide a deeper understanding of and facility with object-oriented program design and implementation. More advanced features of object-orientation, such as inheritance, abstract classes, nested classes, graphical-user interfaces (GUIs), exceptions, input-output are covered. These allow an application-level view of design and implementation to be explored. Throughout the module the quality of application design and the need for a professional approach to software development is emphasized.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

CO532 - Database Systems (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to the theory and practice of database systems. It extends the study of information systems in Stage 1 by focusing on the design, implementation and use of database systems. Topics include database management systems architecture, data modelling and database design, query languages, recent developments and future prospects.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO510 - Software Engineering (30 credits)

13. A synopsis of the curriculum Phase 1 – theory and tools:

• Introduction to basic design principles of systems;

• Software process - concepts & implementation:

o life cycle models (from Extreme Programming to CMM);

o definition, model, measurement, analysis, improvement of software and team (organization) process;

• Requirements elicitation, analysis and specification;

• Introduction to modelling principles (decomposition, abstraction, generalization, projection/views), and types of models (information, behavioural, structural, domain, and functional);

• Basic UML: uses cases, classes, sequence and collaboration diagrams;

• Risk & risk management in software:

o risk management: identification, analysis and prioritization

o software risks: project, process and product

o development methods for reducing risk

• Training in handling electrical components commonly encountered in computing systems and safe working practices.

• Software management: project estimation and metrics, software and process quality assurance, documentation and revision control;

• Introduction to project management;

• Software engineering tools: configuration control (e.g. SVN, GIT, etc.), project management (e.g Trac), integrated development environments (e.g. Eclipse, NetBeans, etc.), and a UML tool (e.g. IBM Rational Rose).



Phase 2 – Practice and techniques:

• Introduction to design patterns;

• More UML: state, activity diagrams, and OCL;

• Project management practice;

• Introduction to software testing: unit testing, coverage analysis, black box testing, integration testing, test cases based use cases, system and acceptance testing, and testing tools;

• Understanding of a number of business techniques including estimation of time, costs and evaluation of technical alternatives in the business context;

• Professional practice (reflective):

o codes of ethics and professional conduct;

o social, legal, historical, and professional issues and concerns;

• Design and implement a simple software system to meet a specified business goal.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CO324 - Computer Systems (15 credits)

14. A synopsis of the curriculum

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental behaviour and components (hardware and software) of a typical computer system, and how they collaborate to manage resources and provide services. The module has two strands: ‘Hardware Architecture’ and ‘Operating Systems and Networks,’ which form around 35% and 65% of the material respectively. Both strands contain material which is of general interest to computer users; quite apart from their academic value, they will be useful to anyone using any modern computer system.

Hardware Architecture

Data representation: Bits, bytes and words. Numeric and non-numeric data. Number representation.

Computer architecture: Fundamental building blocks (logic gates, flip-flops, counters, registers). The fetch/execute cycle. Instruction sets and types.

Data storage: Memory hierarchies and associated technologies. Physical and virtual memory.

Operating Systems and Networks

Operating systems principles. Abstractions. Processes and resources. Security. Application Program Interfaces.

Device interfaces: Handshaking, buffering, programmed and interrupt-driven i/o. Direct Memory Access.

File Systems: Physical structure. File and directory organisation, structure and contents. Naming hierarchies and access. Backup.

Background and history of networking and the Internet.

Networks and protocols: LANs and WANs, layered protocol design. The TCP/IP protocol stack; theory and practice. Connection-oriented and connectionless communication. Unicast, multicast and broadcast. Naming and addressing. Application protocols; worked examples: SMTP, HTTP).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB676 - Strategy Analysis and Tools (15 credits)

The module provides a broad, basic understanding of strategy and strategic management, on which further strategic analysis and exploration of strategic issues can be built. It introduces students to the key vocabulary, concepts and frameworks of strategic management and establishes criteria for assessing whether or not a strategy can be successful. It introduces students to frameworks for analysing the external and internal environments and to different theories of how these relate and of their impact on strategy formulation and implementation.



Students will learn how to identify strategic issues, develop strategic options to address them and decide which option(s) to recommend. Through theoretical readings and case studies, students will develop an appreciation of strategy in different contexts and from different perspectives and of the complexity of strategic decision-making. Students will enhance their ability to read business articles from a strategic perspective and to present strategic arguments in a structured manner

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB677 - Accounting for Management Control and Decision Making (15 credits)

The module introduces students to the role of the accountant in the management information system as well as to a range of accounting techniques and methods which will play a role in the organisational decision-making process and control of the business.



The role of the accountant in the management information system.

The classification of costs, manufacturing and service sector accounts.

Accounting for overhead costs - absorbtion and activity based approaches.

Cost, volume profit analysis and its use in decision making.

Profit planning and the role of budgeting. Flexible budgets. Producing functional and summary budgets.

Standard costing and variance analysis.

Pricing: target costing, full cost pricing, pricing in service companies.

Performance measurement, management control, governance and ethics.

Capital investment decisions.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB681 - Managing Human Resources in Contemporary Organisations (15 credits)

This module will introduce students to the key concepts of managing people, involving an examination of organisational, human resource management and industrial relations theory. This will be achieved through relating relevant theory to practical people and organisational management issues.



The main topics of study are as follows:



• The theory of HRM

• Corporate Social Responsibility & HRM

• Human Resource Planning

• Recruitment & Selection

• Training & Development

• Performance Management & Appraisal

• Reward Management

• Employment Involvement & Participation

• International & Comparative HRM

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB683 - Marketing Strategy (15 credits)

This module introduces students to the core theories of marketing strategy. It is based around a systematic approach to strategic marketing planning and the influences on the process. The module will include:



• Introduction to strategic marketing – corporate vs. marketing strategies

• Identify and understand marketing ethics dilemmas

• Auditing the external and the internal environments

• Marketing information

• Identifying consumer and business segments

• Formulating marketing goals and specific objectives

• Developing a marketing plan for a commercial or a social organization

• Define adequate control and performance indicators to control the marketing plan

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Year in industry

There is an option on some of our joint honours programmes to spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. Our dedicated Placement Team can help you find a placement and support you during the year. Our students go to a wide range of companies, including IBM, Intel and Thomson Reuters or overseas to employers in locations including Amsterdam, Hong Kong and the USA.

Possible modules may include:

CO790 - Sandwich Year Assessment (120 credits)

A synopsis of the curriculumStudents spend a year (minimum 30 weeks) working in an industrial or commercial setting, applying and enhancing the skills and techniques they have developed and studied in the earlier stages of their degree programme. The work they do is entirely under the direction of their industrial supervisor, but support is provided via a dedicated Placement Support Officer within the department. This support includes ensuring that the work they are being expected to do is such that they can meet the learning outcomes of the module. Note that participation in this module is dependent on students obtaining an appropriate placement, for which guidance is provided through the department in the year leading up to the placement. Students who do not obtain a placement will be required to transfer to the appropriate programme without a Year in Industry.

Credits: 120 credits (60 ECTS credits).

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Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

CB520 - Service Management (15 credits)

A synopsis of the curriculum

Students will be expected to develop the ability to use appropriate techniques of analysis and enquiry within Operations and Service Management and to learn how to evaluate the alternatives and make recommendations. Topics include:

• The nature of services and service strategy

• Service development and technology

• Service quality and the service encounter

• Project/Event management and control

• Managing capacity and demand in services

• Managing inventories

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO600 - Project (30 credits)

The project gives you the opportunity to follow and develop your particular technical interests, undertake a larger and less tightly specified piece of work than you have before (at university), and develop the project organisation, implementation and documentation techniques which you have learnt in other modules. The technical and professional aspects of project courses are seen as particularly important by both employers (who will often bring them up in interviews) and by professional bodies.



The project may be self-proposed or may be selected from a list of project proposals. Typically, a project will involve the specification, design, implementation, documentation and demonstration of a technical artefact. The project is supervised by a member of the academic staff, who holds weekly meetings with the group, during which s/he will give general advice and will assess the progress of the group and the contributions by individual students.



Project deliverables are:

- a technical report, in the style of an academic paper, describing the scientific/technical outcome of the project;

- a well-indexed corpus of material that supports the achievements claimed.

In addition, each individual prepares a report outlining his/her contributions to each of the various aspects of the project. This report should not be a repeat of other material delivered as part of the project, but an assessment of the progress of the project and reflections on what the individual has learnt from undertaking it. In particular, it should include a description of the particular activities and outcomes that individual has contributed to the project, and of how the group worked together. This report will be discussed at a viva voce examination which should include a short presentation/demonstration of the project.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CO620 - Research Project (30 credits)

The project gives you the opportunity to follow and develop your particular technical interests, undertake a larger and less tightly specified piece of work than you have before (at university), and develop the project organisation, implementation and documentation techniques which you have learnt in other modules. The technical and professional aspects of project courses are seen as particularly important by both employers (who will often bring them up in interviews) and by professional bodies.



The project may be self-proposed or may be selected from a list of project proposals. Typically, a project will involve the specification, design, implementation, documentation and demonstration of a technical artefact. The project is supervised by a member of the academic staff, who holds weekly meetings with the group, during which s/he will give general advice and will assess the progress of the group and the contributions by individual students.



Project deliverables are:

- a technical report, in the style of an academic paper, describing the scientific/technical outcome of the project;

- a well-indexed corpus of material that supports the achievements claimed.

In addition, each individual prepares a report outlining his/her contributions to each of the various aspects of the project. This report should not be a repeat of other material delivered as part of the project, but an assessment of the progress of the project and reflections on what the individual has learnt from undertaking it. In particular, it should include a description of the particular activities and outcomes that individual has contributed to the project, and of how the group worked together. This report will be discussed at a viva voce examination which should include a short presentation/demonstration of the project.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CO650 - IT Consultancy Project (30 credits)

Students taking this module will undertake two or (typically) more assignments for the Kent IT Clinic (KITC). Each assignment will be of one of three types: .

Work on one of KITC’s contracts with an external client. To the extent that client-funded workallows, every student will be given at least one assignment of this type. Wherever practical, astudent will be encouraged to participate in the negotiation and pricing of contracts, under theultimate supervision of KITC management. For each assignment, the student may work on theassignment individually or as part of a group, as directed by KITC.

A contribution to the infrastructure of KITC itself. These assignments work in a similar way to external assignments, but with KITC as the client.

Formulating a costed proposal for the future development of KITC, and presenting reasoned argument in support of the proposal to KITC management, as a candidate for inclusion in KITC’s strategic plan for the following academic year. Every student will have at least one assignment of this type.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CB684 - Strategic Human Resource Management (15 credits)

This module will introduce students to the key concepts of managing people, involving an examination of organisational, human resource management and industrial relations theory. This will be achieved through relating relevant theory to practical people and organisational management issues.



The main topics of study are as follows:

• The theory of strategic HRM

• Strategic HRM and Business Strategy

• Strategic HRM and Organisational Performance

• Strategic employee involvement and participation

• HRM in the public sector

• HRM in Small and Medium Enterprises

• HRM in the voluntary sector

• Strategic HRM in the international context

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB679 - Corporate and Business Strategy (15 credits)

Synopsis of the curriculum



This module will extend students' knowledge and understanding of strategic management and strategic issues. It will introduce a range of contemporary issues associated with the formulation and implementation of corporate and business strategies with an emphasis on identifying and implementing strategic change within the organisation, building dynamic capabilities and developing coherent strategies.



Issues might include strategies for a recession, global strategies, knowledge-based strategies, firms and industries, strategies where profit is of secondary (or no) importance. The module will also extend students' theoretical knowledge by presenting contemporary debates and issues in strategic thinking.



The module will use a project in which students identify and suggest possible strategic solutions to a strategic issue in a real organisation to develop students' ability to link theory and practice in real-life situations.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB544 - International Marketing (15 credits)

This module will introduce students to the key concepts, theories and issues involved in international marketing. In doing so it will enable students to understand how to identify and evaluate opportunities in international markets and assess the different market entry modes available to companies. In addition students will consider the need to adapt marketing mix elements for different international markets.



The main topics of study are as follows:



• Introduction to international marketing: Definitions, theories, approaches and motives.

• International Marketing Research

• Assessing international markets: The political and economic environment

• Assessing international markets: The Sociocultural environment

• Theories and frameworks for International market evaluation and selection

• Market entry modes: export, intermediate and hierarchical

• International marketing plans and strategy: Segmentation, targeting and positioning

• Designing the global marketing mix: Product, pricing, communication and distribution decisions

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB545 - Marketing Research (15 credits)

This module aims to provide students with understanding and experience of the theory and practice of marketing research. During the module students design and implement a marketing research plan, design a questionnaire, collect and analyse data, prepare an oral presentation and write a marketing research report.



The main topics of study are as follows:



• Introduction to marketing research: Defining and designing marketing research projects

• Understanding data: Secondary data and databases

• Primary data collection techniques.

• Questionnaire design

• Measurement and measurement scales and error.

• Sampling and sample design and error

• Entering and coding data with SPSS

• Data analysis techniques

• Communicating the results of marketing research.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB546 - Marketing Communications (15 credits)

The module will provide students with the tools of marketing communications. Specifically students taking this module will be able to evaluate strengths and weakness of marketing communications channels. Over the course of a term the module will provide students with an understanding of the principles, methods and strategies of marketing communications. The main tools of marketing communications will be discussed as well as their suitability and effectiveness:

Topics may cover:

• The communications process

• Advertising

• Strategy and media planning

• Image, brand management and packaging

• Direct marketing

• Digital and interactive media

• Sales promotion, merchandising and point of sale

• Public relations and corporate identity

• Exhibitions, trade shows, product placement and sponsorship

• Personal selling

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CB612 - New Enterprise Startup (15 credits)

The curriculum is based on the Small Firms Enterprise Development Initiative (National Standards-setting body for small business) Standards for Business Start-up, but has been expanded to include contemporary issues such as Intellectual Property and recent legislation. It will include the following areas of study:

• Why firms become insolvent – economic financial and operational reasons for business failure, risks & liabilities, skills requirements for business ownership, self-development planning, sources of advice and support for businesses

• The new business planning process and format, developing & evaluating the business idea, producing a business plan for potential lenders.

• Financial aspects – budgetary planning & control, cash-flow and working capital, understanding financial accounting and key financial documents, break-even analysis, credit control and debt recovery, understanding PAYE & VAT.

• Market research, competition and barriers to market entry, identifying customers, market segmentation, planning the sales & marketing processes, customer perceptions & customer care, developing quality standards for the business

• Legal issues: reporting requirements, UK & EU law relevant to small businesses, business formats & trading status and their respective risks and liabilities, insurance, insolvency; patents, copyrights and IPR.

• Planning & employing staff, planning and obtaining premises, physical & financial resources; phased implementation of the business plan.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO539 - Web Development (15 credits)

Building scaleable web sites using client-side and and server-side frameworks (e.g. GWT, CakePHP, Ruby on Rails).

Data transfer technologies, e.g. XML and JSON.

Building highly interactive web sites using e.g. AJAX.

Web services

Deploying applications and services to the web: servers, infrastructure services, and traffic and performance analysis.

Web and application development for mobile devices.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO528 - Introduction to Intelligent Systems (15 credits)

This module covers the basic principles of machine learning and the kinds of problems that can be solved by such techniques. You learn about the philosophy of AI, how knowledge is represented and algorithms to search state spaces. The module also provides an introduction to both machine learning and biologically inspired computation.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO832 - Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery (15 credits)

This module explores a range of different data mining and knowledge discovery techniques and algorithms. You learn about the strengths and weaknesses of different techniques and how to choose the most appropriate for any particular task. You use a state-of-the-art data-mining tool, and learn to evaluate the quality of discovered knowledge.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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EC566 - Macroeconomics for Business (15 credits)

The aim of the module is to develop your understanding of the principles of macroeconomics as they relate to business. We examine how these principles can help you to understand the current macroeconomic policy debate and how they are applied to common macroeconomic situations you will meet in business.



Module topics include: the circular flow of the macroeconomy; inflation and unemployment definitions and causes; aggregate supply, aggregate demand and fiscal policy; money, the financial system, interest rates and monetary policy; international trade, the balance of payments and exchange rates.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PL583 - Philosophy of Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence (30 credits)

The module will study some of the major works in the history of modern philosophy of cognitive science and artificial intelligence. An indicative list of topics is: The Turing test; the Chinese Room argument; the frame problem; connectionism; extended and embodied cognition; artificial consciousness. The approach will be philosophical and critical, and will involve the close reading of texts. Students will be expected to engage critically with the works being studied and to formulate and argue for their own views on the issues covered.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CB587 - Digital Marketing Strategy (15 credits)

This module aims to develop a critical understanding of the role of digital marketing in modern organisations. The module considers what digital marketing strategy means looking at a range of examples across business sectors. Core areas are looked at including the technologies which make digital marketing possible, the relationship between digital marketing strategies and the wider organisation, the key issues in the development and implementation of digital marketing strategies and the threats, security and other, posed by digital marketing.



The following topics may be covered:

Enabling technologies for e-commerce: The Digital Marketing Environment, Digital Marketing Strategy; The Internet and the World Wide Web; Mobile platforms; Dot com and multi-channel; Social Media and Web 2.0; Database and data warehouses; Web site design and management; Marketplaces; B2B Digital Marketing; Business Models and Innovation.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO636 - Cognitive Neural Networks (15 credits)

In this module you learn what is meant by neural networks and how to explain the mathematical equations that underlie them. You also build neural networks using state of the art simulation technology and apply these networks to the solution of problems. In addition, the module discusses examples of computation applied to neurobiology and cognitive psychology.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO641 - Computer Graphics and Animation (15 credits)

Computer graphics and animation are important for a variety of technical and artistic applications including web design, HCI and GUI development, games and simulations, digital photography and cinema, medical and scientific visualization, etc.



This module introduces the subject from the perspective of computing. You will learn about technologies and techniques for modeling, manipulating, capturing, displaying and storing 2D and 3D scenes, digital images, animations and video. You will also gain practical experience of 3D modelling and animation tools.



Digital Imaging and Video:

Human vision

Colour models

Images, video and 3D

Capture and display

Enhancement and conversion

Formats and compression (e.g. GIF, JPEG, MPEG)



Computer Graphics:

Graphics pipeline

3D object and scene modelling with polygon meshes

Transformations

Projection, clipping and visible surface determination

Illumination and shading

Ray tracing and photorealism



Computer Animation:

Key-frame animation

Warping and morphing

Articulated figures

Kinematics, dynamics and collision detection

Particle systems and flocking

Computer-generated human characters and video-realism

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO643 - Computing Law and Professional Responsibility (15 credits)

The scope of the module is outlined below. Note that topics will not necessarily be delivered in this order

Professional issues and professional organisations.



Data privacy legislation, and other UK laws relating to the professional use of computer systems

Criminal law relating to networked computer use, including new Anti-Terrorism legislation; and their application



Intellectual Property Rights, including Copyright, Patent and Contract Laws

Health & Safety issues.

Computer-based Projects, including the vendor-client relationship and professional responsibilities

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO645 - IT Consultancy Practice 2 (15 credits)

Students taking this module will undertake one or (typically) more assignments for the Kent IT Clinic (KITC). Each assignment will be of one of three types:

Work on one of KITC’s contracts with an external client. To the extent that client-funded work allows, every student will be given at least one assignment of this type. Wherever practical, a student will be encouraged to participate in the negotiation and pricing of contracts, under the ultimate supervision of KITC management. For each assignment, the student may work on the assignment individually or as part of a group, as directed by KITC. A contribution to the infrastructure of KITC itself.

A contribution to the infrastructure of KITC itself. These assignments work in a similar way to external assignments, but with KITC as the client.

Formulating a costed proposal for the future development of KITC, and presenting reasoned argument in support of the proposal to KITC management, as a candidate for inclusion in KITC’s strategic plan for the following academic year.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO646 - Computing in the Classroom (15 credits)

Students will spend one half-day per week for ten weeks in a school with a nominated teacher. They will observe sessions taught by their designated teacher and possibly other teachers. Later they will act somewhat in the role of a teaching assistant, by helping individual pupils who are having difficulties or by working with small groups. They may take ‘hotspots’: brief sessions with the whole class where they explain a technical topic or talk about aspects of university life. They must keep a weekly log of their activities. Each student must also devise a special project in consultation with the teacher and with the module convener. They must then implement and evaluate the project.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CO659 - Computational Creativity (15 credits)

The module aim is to give students an overview and understanding of key

theoretical, practical and philosophical research and issues around

computational creativity, and to give them practical experience in writing and

evaluating creative software.



The module will cover the following topics:

• Introduction to computational creativity

Examples of computational creativity software e.g. musical systems,

artistic systems, linguistic systems, proof generator systems,

furniture design systems

• Evaluation of computational creativity systems (both of the quality

and the creativity of systems)

• Philosophical issues concerning creativity in computers

• Comparison of computer creativity to human creativity

• Collaborative creativity between humans and computers

• Overview of recent research directions/results in computational

creativity

• Practical experience in writing creative software

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Teaching & Assessment

Computing

Most modules run for a single 12-week term, and usually include a combination of lectures, seminars, private study and practical sessions. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and end-of-year examination and details are shown in the module outlines on the web. Project modules are assessed wholly by coursework.

Business Administration

Most modules are taught by a combination of  lectures and seminars and you have regular access to a personal tutor for advice on matters concerning your studies Modules also involve individual study and sessions in the computer laboratories. In your final year, you take at least one project module, including the possibility of a 30-credit business/management project on a topic of your choice. Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and exams.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • provide a programme which will attract and meet the needs of those contemplating a career involving a significant element of computing and those motivated primarily by intellectual interest in applied computing and business administration
  • provide a sound knowledge and understanding of computing and business administration
  • provide skills which will be of lasting value in a constantly changing field
  • offer a range of options to enable students to study selected areas of computing and/or of business administration in depth
  • provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship, which requires students to engage with work at the frontiers of knowledge
  • develop students' critical, analytical and problem-solving skills, which can be applied to business, computing and other settings
  • provide relevant work experience
  • provide an opportunity to develop knowledge understanding and skills of relevance to Computing and Business Administration within an industrial or commercial organisation.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • hardware – the major functional components of a computer system
  • software – programming languages and practice, tools and packages, computer applications, structuring of data and information
  • communications and interaction – basic computer communication network concepts, communication between computers and people, the control and operation of computers
  • practice – problem identification and analysis, design development, testing and evaluation. 
  • organisations, their environment and their management, including the management of people, operations management, finance, marketing and organisational strategy 
  • social science concepts and theories and their application in business and management contexts
  • aspects of the core subject areas from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation.

Intellectual skills

You develop intellectual skills in:

  • modelling – knowledge and understanding of the modelling and design of computer-based systems and of the trade-off involved in design choices
  • reflection and communication – the ability to present succinctly, rational and reasoned arguments, to a range of audiences
  • requirements – identifying and analysing criteria and specifications appropriate to specific problems and planing strategies for their solution
  • criteria evaluation and testing – analysing the extent to which a computer-based system meets the criteria defined for its current use and future development 
  • methods and tools – deploying appropriate theory, practices and tools for the specification, design, implementation, and evaluation of computer-based systems
  • professional responsibility –  recognize and be guided by the professional economic, social, environmental, moral and ethical issues involved in the sustainable exploitation of computer technology
  • computational thinking – demonstrate analytical ability and show its relevance to everyday life
  • the critical evaluation of arguments and evidence
  • analyse and draw reasoned conclusions concerning structured and, to a more limited extent, unstructured problems
  • apply some of the intellectual skills specified for the programme from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation.  

Subject-specific skills

You develop subject-specific skills in:

  • design and implementation – specifying, designing and implementing computer-based systems
  • evaluation – evaluating systems in terms of attributes and possible trade-offs
  • information management – applying the principles of effective information management, information organisation, and information retrieval skills to information of various kinds.
  • tools – deploying the tools used for the construction and documentation of software, to understand the process involved in using computers to solve practical problems
  • identifying, formulating and solving business/decision-making problems using appropriate qualitative and quantitative tools
  • creating, evaluating and assessing options in a range of business situations and applying concepts and knowledge appropriately. 
  • effective communication about business issues, orally and in writing
  • apply some of the subject-specific skills specified for the programme from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in:

  • teamwork – working effectively as a member of a development team
  • communication – making succinct presentations to a range of audiences about technical problems and their solutions
  • information technology – effective information-retrieval skills (including the use of browsers, search engines and catalogues), and effective use of general IT facilities
  • numeracy – understanding and presenting cases involving a quantitative dimension
  • self-management – managing your learning and development including time management and organisational skills.

Careers

Kent Business School equips you with the skills you need to build a successful career. Through your studies, you acquire communication skills, the ability to work in a team and independently, and the ability to express your opinions persuasively and with passion. Through modules on entrepreneurship such as our New Enterprise Start-up module, we give you the confidence and the expertise you need to start your own business and, through our varied contacts in the business world, we give you the opportunity to gain valuable work experience as part of your degree.

Those students who take a year in industry find the practical experience they gain gives them a real advantage in the graduate job market. In addition, the Kent IT Clinic gives you the opportunity to take on consultancy work for local companies, giving you real-world experience alongside your academic studies.

Our high graduate employment rate speaks for itself and recent graduates have gone on to work in companies including: BT, Hays Consulting, Juniper Networks, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Oracle, Thomson Reuters and T-Mobile.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

AAB

GCSE

Mathematics grade C

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

DDD

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 16 points at HL including Mathematics 5 at HL or SL (Mathematics Studies 6 at SL)

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised. However, details of our proposed funding opportunities for 2016 entry can be found on our funding page.  

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. Details of the scholarship for 2017 entry have not yet been finalised. However, for 2016 entry, the scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages. Please review the eligibility criteria on that page. 

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £16480

As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

The University of Kent intends to increase its regulated full-time tuition fees for all Home and EU undergraduates starting in September 2017 from £9,000 to £9,250. This is subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise by 2.8%.

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

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The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000