Students preparing for their graduation ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral

Sport Management - MSport

UCAS code C608:K

CLEARING 2018

Planning to start this September? We may still have full-time vacancies available for this course. View 2018 course details.
2019

Do you want to turn your passion for sport into a rewarding career? On our Sport Management degree, you develop an understanding of what elite athletes need and how to help reluctant exercisers to get moving, alongside management and marketing skills that prepare you for a career in the sport industry.

Overview

The School of Sport and Exercise Sciences provides a first-rate experience for students in an innovative and fast-growing department. We encourage a range of teaching methods for student learning, including traditional lectures and more student-centred approaches, such as problem-based learning scenarios.

Our degree programme

On this four-year MSport programme there is an emphasis on building up practical experience. There are lots of opportunities for applied learning in leisure and fitness centres, as well as at sports events and in sports development.

In your first year, you take a series of introductory modules on the sports industries, sport and exercise psychology, and management principles. You choose optional modules from a range of sport-related and business modules.

In your second and third years, you study leadership in sport as well as marketing and promotion, and select further modules depending on your particular interests.

In your third year, you have the opportunity to complete a placement module within the sports industry, where you gain valuable experience and have the chance to apply the theory you have learnt in practice.

In your fourth year, you have further opportunities to gain workplace experience and to build up your network of contacts. You write a work placement report and are able to further specialise by selecting modules of particular interest to you.

Upon graduation, you hold a qualification that lies between an undergraduate and a Master’s degree.

Three-year degree

It is also possible to take this programme as a three-year BA (Hons) degree Sport Management.

Study resources

Our laboratories are based in the £11 million Medway Park development, a regional centre of sporting excellence. They include the latest equipment, such as our:

  • environmental chamber, which can recreate the atmosphere in the Brazilian jungle or at the top of Everest
  • anti-gravity treadmill, originally developed to help NASA astronauts to exercise in space
  • cycling and rowing ergometers to measure anaerobic capacity
  • isokinetic dynamometer to measure muscle and joint function
  • brain and muscle stimulators
  • 3D motion video analysis
  • imaging and treatment ultrasound
  • gait analysis and force pedals
  • blood testing and gas analysis equipment
  • rehabilitation gymnasium.

Extra activities

There is a thriving sports scene for students. Sports clubs at the Medway campus include athletics, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, kickboxing, rowing, taekwondo, Thai boxing and volleyball, plus women’s netball and men’s futsal and rugby.

With our free shuttle bus, it’s also easy to join the sports clubs on the Canterbury campus. These include American football, archery, boxing, caving, canoeing, cheerleading, cycling, equestrian, fencing, floorball, golf, gymnastics, hockey, judo, karate, kendo, korfball, kung fu, lacrosse, mountaineering, sailing and windsurfing, skydiving, snooker and pool, snowsports, squash, swimming, surfing, tennis, trampolining, ultimate frisbee and women’s rugby.

Professional network

The School of Sport and Exercise Sciences has links to many sporting bodies. It works with companies such as Science in Sport and Team Sky, and with organisations such as:

  • the NHS
  • RFU (governing English rugby)
  • English Institute of Sport
  • British Cycling
  • UK Sport
  • World Anti-Doping Agency
  • UEFA
  • UK Sport
  • Ministry of Defence.

Sports scholarships

If you are already competing at county level or equivalent, you can apply for a sports scholarship from the University. One of our best-known graduates is Olympic gold medallist Susannah Townsend. During her time at Kent she had a sports scholarship and played for Canterbury Hockey Club (where she continues to play midfield).

Independent rankings

Sports Science at Kent was ranked 15th in The Complete University Guide 2018.

For graduate prospects, Sports Science at Kent was ranked 11th in The Complete University Guide 2018. Of Sports Science students who graduated from Kent in 2016, over 95% were in work or further study within six months (DLHE).

Teaching Excellence Framework

Based on the evidence available, the TEF Panel judged that the University of Kent delivers consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for its students. It is of the highest quality found in the UK.

Please see the University of Kent's Statement of Findings for more information.

TEF Gold logo

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Stage 1

Modules may include Credits

Management Principles aims to provide an understanding of the challenges of managing people within complex work organisations. The experience of work and employment are being affected by rapid change as a result of a number of factors including new technology, the growth of global competition and the changing demographic profiles and values of the work force. These developments are considered within an historical context. An exploration of their implications for management practices and organisational forms will be conducted.

Students will be introduced to the main concepts and theories through readings and discussions of the main authors in the field. Case studies will be used to show how these concepts can impact upon management decision making within work organisations.

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15

The module aims to provide students with the necessary foundation of skills to study at degree level. It will cover a number of topics that will be invaluable for success in subsequent modules in your degree. This will include referencing and plagiarism, academic writing, critical thinking, basic statistics and research methods.

- Introduction to referencing and plagiarism

- Introduction to academic writing style

- Introduction to history of science

- Introduction to critical thinking

- Introduction to research methods

- Introduction to statistical concepts

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15

This module addresses all of the aims of the BA (Hons) Sport and Exercise Management, in particular, understanding the way that sport organisations work across each of the three acknowledged sectors of the sport industry. While gaining an understanding of how sport works, students should also gain insights into what skills, knowledge and competencies they need to acquire in order to find work or operate effectively within any of these sectors.

A synopsis of the curriculum

• Sport in the United Kingdom.

• Participation in sport

• Sport sectors and structures (voluntary, professional and public)

• Rational for sport provision and sport policies

• From grassroots to gold – the pathways for athletes, coaches and officials.

• Core activities of a sports organisation

• Multisport Games (Olympic, Commonwealth)

• Challenges that face sport

• Establishing Competitive Advantage

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15

The module aims to provide students with knowledge and understanding of human responses and adaptations to sport and exercise. Using a psychological approach, students acquire knowledge and understanding of sport and exercise performance and exercise adherence to promote health. Lectures and seminars provide forums for discussion and understanding of cognitions, affect and behaviour and the complex interactions between these. A key module aim is to provide an understanding of the application of theory to real ‘applied’ situations within sport and exercise settings.

A synopsis of topics included in this module are:

- Introduction to sport and exercise psychology

- The learning and performance process

- Feedback

- Attention and concentration

- Personality and individual differences

- Motivation

- Self-confidence

- Arousal, stress and anxiety

- Social facilitation and audience effects

- Sport and exercise psychology in action

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15

The main aims of this module are to explore and gain knowledge of human physiology. Students will study the major systems of the human body including the musculoskeletal system, the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. Students will gain an understanding of their structure and function.

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15

This module looks at the systematic processes involved in testing fitness. Consideration is given to the evaluation of fitness in both the field and in the laboratory. A range of fitness tests for a variety of parameters of fitness are covered. Students are taught to consider the reliability and validity of the tests as well as the specificity of the test to the population they are working with.

A synopsis of topics included in this module are:

- Health screening

- Fitness assessment & evaluation

- Principles of sport & exercise training

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15

The aim of this module is to give students a solid grounding in key statistical techniques required to analyse effectively business data and data relevant for business. The content includes:

• Maths and statistical skills for business; revision of algebra and basic mathematical functions.

• Summarising data with histograms, bar charts, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion.

• Spreadsheets: features and functions of commonly-used spreadsheet software including: workbook, worksheet, rows, columns, cells, data, text, formulae, formatting, printing, graphics and macros, charts and graphs, data management facilities, data validation, spreadsheet security and documentation.

• Probability: The relationship between probability, proportion and percent, addition and multiplication rules in probability theory and Venn diagrams.

• Common Probability Density Functions.

• Sampling and its use in inference, and applications of sampling in business management.

• Regression and correlation: scatter plots; simple regression; interpreting computer output.

• Forecasting using spreadsheets.

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15

The module introduces to students the importance of marketing in competitive and dynamic environments. The key topics of the module are:

• The marketing concept

• The marketing environment

• Market segmentation & targeting

• Brand development and management

• Management of the marketing mix

• Marketing research and new product development

• The implications of internationalisation for marketing managers

• Ethical issues in marketing

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15

Synopsis of the curriculum

  • Definition of management accounting;

  • Relationship to financial accounting;

  • Absorption costing; marginal costing;

  • Process costing; joint costs;

  • Activity based costing;

  • Cost behaviour;

  • Breakeven analysis;

  • Pricing: external, internal, transfer pricing;

  • Forecasting costs;

  • Regression analysis;

  • Information and management accounting

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    Stage 2

    Modules may include Credits

    Leadership in the context of sport and exercise is becoming increasingly recognised as providing the ‘spark’ that drives successful sport organisations.

    In this module, students will become more aware of styles of leadership and types of communication used in the sporting context.

    - Role of the coach & coaching philosophy

    - Coaching / teaching styles

    - Learning styles

    - Planning a coaching / teaching programme

    - Communication & motivation

    - Analysing performance

    - Feedback

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    To identify the structure of the Sports Industry

    To discuss the structure of a situational analysis, including the micro and

    macro environment.

    To discuss market segmentation and targeting.

    To discuss the 7 P’s Marketing Mix.

    To discuss primary and secondary research within a business context.

    To discuss the construction of a market research plan.

    Cultural, social, personal & psychological factors relating to consumer

    behaviour.

    Evaluate a range of marketing campaigns

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    30

    The module starts by considering the multi-dimensional nature of health to broaden student’s understanding of the many factors – individual or environmental - that could contribute to personal experience of health & what that means to different members of the population. Key aspects of Sport and Exercise promotion are considered, culminating in students completing a sport or exercise promotion event of their own as part of the assessment for the module. Whilst there is an emphasis on theoretical issues in the module, students are encouraged to apply these principles to the various aspects of sport and exercise promotion practice.

    - Introduction – What is health, sport and exercise?

    - Determinants of health, sport and exercise

    - Concepts and theories of health & health promotion

    - Health promoters & their roles

    - Sport development agencies and their roles

    - Guidelines for agencies involved in developmental work

    - Identifying population needs in relation to health & Sport needs

    - Motivation & behaviour change

    - Planning & evaluating a health, sport or exercise promotion activity

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    A synopsis of the curriculum:

    To discuss Human resource / personnel policies specifically in relation to recruitment and selection activities in sport settings.

    Working with Volunteers in Sport

    Discuss performance management / appraisal processes

    Investigate training and development activities to include graduate training programmes, development assessment centres, job shadowing and succession planning.

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    15

    The module aims to provide students with knowledge and understanding of human responses and adaptations to sport and exercise. Using a psychological approach, students acquire knowledge and understanding of sport and exercise performance and exercise adherence to promote health. Lectures and seminars provide forums for discussion and understanding of cognitions, affect and behaviour and the complex interactions between these. A key module aim is to provide an understanding of the application of theory to real ‘applied’ situations within sport and exercise settings.

    A synopsis of topics included in this module are:

    - Individual differences and personality

    - Attributions and perceived control

    - Exercise behaviour

    - Motivation

    - Emotions in sport

    - Attention and focus

    - Group dynamics

    - Leadership

    - Communication

    - Goal setting

    - Psychophysiology in sport and exercise

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    15

    This module will provide students with a grounding in training theory and application, specifically looking at programme design and implementation in health and athletic performance.

    Indicative content includes:

    - Principles of sport & exercise training

    - Training methodology

    - Programme design & organisation

    - Adaptations to training

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    15

    The module is intended to provide students with an understanding of research design, planning and data analysis. The first half of the module is dedicated to learning about inferential data analysis and the use of SPSS to understand basic statistical concepts (the normal distribution) and perform parametric and non-parametric statistical tests (e.g., Student’s t-test). The second half of the module is dedicated to research design and planning. IN this part of the module, students will develop a research proposal that will ultimately become the basis of their year 3 dissertation.

    A synopsis of topics included in this module are:

    - A range of statistical tests analysing parametric and non-parametric data

    - The process of forming a research question and hypothesis

    - Ethics in research

    - Scientific writing skills

    - Supervisor contact

    - Presentation of current dissertation projects

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    15

    Managing People and Teams aims to provide an understanding of the key concepts within management theory. This core knowledge is applied to a range of organisational settings so that the influence of management theory on management practice is understood. The role played by specialist management functions within Human Resource Management (HRM) and Employment Relations is investigated.

    Students will be introduced to the main concepts and theories through readings and discussions of the main authors in the field. Case studies will be used to show how these concepts can impact upon management thinking and decision making within work organisations.

    Read more
    15

    The module introduces to students the importance of marketing in competitive and dynamic environments. The key topics of the module are:

    • The marketing concept

    • The marketing environment

    • Market segmentation & targeting

    • Brand development and management

    • Management of the marketing mix

    • Marketing research and new product development

    • The implications of internationalisation for marketing managers

    • Ethical issues in marketing

    Read more
    15

    This module aims to enable students to understand the social and economic changes that have raised the status of enterprise, small business and entrepreneurial ventures in the global economy. It examines the diverse nature of entrepreneurs, their characteristics and motivations, as well as the barriers and issues facing entrepreneurs when planning and establishing a new venture.

    The key topics of the module are:

    1) Factors that have influenced the growth of the enterprise culture in the UK.

    2) The role and relevance of SMEs in the UK economy; definitions of SMEs; statistical information; Government policies and initiatives, and support agencies.

    3) Whether entrepreneurs are born or made; whether enterprise skills can be taught or learned, and whether entrepreneurs differ from business owners and other managers.

    4) Enterprise and innovation development in organisations.

    5) Differences in attitudes, objectives, skill requirements and business strategies between small and large firms.

    6) Surviving the early stages of business development, including failure rates in new and small enterprises and barriers to growth and development.

    7) The planning process for starting a new venture – including risks and liabilities; problems and pitfalls, and potential profit and success.

    8) The protection of ideas and intellectual capital.

    9) Funding a new enterprise, including via 'friends, family and fools', business angels and venture capitalists.

    10) Enterprise in different contexts, including corporate enterprise, public sector enterprise and social enterprise.

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    Stage 3

    Modules may include Credits

    The course takes the form of an individual research study. There are initially 4 taught lectures covering, ethical considerations and the management of a research project. The research projects are then conducted with the supervision of a School tutor who will advise the student on issues such as methodology, analysis and presentation, but it is the student’s responsibility to organise, conduct, analyse and present the research as required.

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    30

    The aims of this module are to develop an insight into the key concepts and theories of human resource management (HRM) and organisational behaviour (OB). It will develop in students an understanding of the links between HRM policies and practices and organisational performance, and the factors that influence the management of employees

    Content will include:

    1) An introduction to Human Resource Management (HRM) and Organisational Behaviour (OB)

    2) Strategic HRM

    3) Performance Management

    4) Strategic Recruitment and Selection

    5) Leadership

    6) Power, Politics and Decision Making

    7) Making the business case for diversity

    8) Organisational Culture and International HRM

    9) Pay, Performance and Reward

    10) Managing Innovation and Change

    11) HRM and Ethics

    Read more
    15

    This module aims to enable students to understand the social and economic changes that have raised the status of enterprise, small business and entrepreneurial ventures in the global economy. It examines the diverse nature of entrepreneurs, their characteristics and motivations, as well as the barriers and issues facing entrepreneurs when planning and establishing a new venture.

    The key topics of the module are:

    1) Factors that have influenced the growth of the enterprise culture in the UK.

    2) The role and relevance of SMEs in the UK economy; definitions of SMEs; statistical information; Government policies and initiatives, and support agencies.

    3) Whether entrepreneurs are born or made; whether enterprise skills can be taught or learned, and whether entrepreneurs differ from business owners and other managers.

    4) Enterprise and innovation development in organisations.

    5) Differences in attitudes, objectives, skill requirements and business strategies between small and large firms.

    6) Surviving the early stages of business development, including failure rates in new and small enterprises and barriers to growth and development.

    7) The planning process for starting a new venture – including risks and liabilities; problems and pitfalls, and potential profit and success.

    8) The protection of ideas and intellectual capital.

    9) Funding a new enterprise, including via 'friends, family and fools', business angels and venture capitalists.

    10) Enterprise in different contexts, including corporate enterprise, public sector enterprise and social enterprise.

    Read more
    15

    The understanding and application of enterprise knowledge is seen as a transferable skill that can have cross-school application within the University, in that it has relevance to students from a broad range of academic disciplines who might be considering self-employment after graduation.

    The curriculum is based on the Small Firms Enterprise Development Initiative (National Standards-setting body for small business) Standards for Business Start-up, but has been expanded to include contemporary issues such as Intellectual Property and recent legislation.

    The module will include the following areas of study:

    1) Why firms become insolvent – economic financial and operational reasons for business failure; risks & liabilities; skills requirements for business ownership; self-development planning; sources of advice, and support for businesses.

    2) The new business planning process and format - developing and evaluating the business idea, and producing a business plan for potential lenders.

    3) Financial aspects – budgetary planning and control; cash-flow and working capital; understanding financial accounting and key financial documents; break-even analysis; credit control, and debt recovery.

    4) Market research, competition and barriers to market entry - identifying customers; market segmentation; planning the sales and marketing processes; customer perceptions and customer care, and developing quality standards for the business

    5) Legal issues - reporting requirements; UK & EU law relevant to small businesses; business formats and trading status and their respective risks and liabilities; insurance; insolvency, and intellectual property rights such as patents and copyright.

    6) Planning and employing staff - planning and obtaining premises; physical and financial resources, and the phased implementation of the business plan.

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    15

    A synopsis of the curriculum

    The curriculum is organised into two parts.

    Part I:

    Understanding the European Business Environment (Autumn)

    The European Business Environment (PESTEL), History and Development of the EU, Political and Institutional Framework of the EU. Impact of EU policies on business operations: from Single Market to Single Currency, EU Competition and Social Policies, Regional Policy and Industrial Policy, EU Trade Policy.

    Part II:

    Doing Business in the 'New' Europe (Spring)

    Formulating a European Business Strategy, Identifying Market Opportunities and Evaluating Modes of Entry. Understanding the impact on business of cultural diversity. Management within a European environment. Finance, Marketing and HRM issues for European Business.

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    Stage 4

    Modules may include Credits

    The aims of this module are to develop an insight into the key concepts and theories of human resource management (HRM) and organisational behaviour (OB). It will develop in students an understanding of the links between HRM policies and practices and organisational performance, and the factors that influence the management of employees

    Content will include:

    1) An introduction to Human Resource Management (HRM) and Organisational Behaviour (OB)

    2) Strategic HRM

    3) Performance Management

    4) Strategic Recruitment and Selection

    5) Leadership

    6) Power, Politics and Decision Making

    7) Making the business case for diversity

    8) Organisational Culture and International HRM

    9) Pay, Performance and Reward

    10) Managing Innovation and Change

    11) HRM and Ethics

    Read more
    15

    A synopsis of the curriculum

    The curriculum is organised into two parts.

    Part I:

    Understanding the European Business Environment (Autumn)

    The European Business Environment (PESTEL), History and Development of the EU, Political and Institutional Framework of the EU. Impact of EU policies on business operations: from Single Market to Single Currency, EU Competition and Social Policies, Regional Policy and Industrial Policy, EU Trade Policy.

    Part II:

    Doing Business in the 'New' Europe (Spring)

    Formulating a European Business Strategy, Identifying Market Opportunities and Evaluating Modes of Entry. Understanding the impact on business of cultural diversity. Management within a European environment. Finance, Marketing and HRM issues for European Business.

    Read more
    30

    The understanding and application of enterprise knowledge is seen as a transferable skill that can have cross-school application within the University, in that it has relevance to students from a broad range of academic disciplines who might be considering self-employment after graduation.

    The curriculum is based on the Small Firms Enterprise Development Initiative (National Standards-setting body for small business) Standards for Business Start-up, but has been expanded to include contemporary issues such as Intellectual Property and recent legislation.

    The module will include the following areas of study:

    1) Why firms become insolvent – economic financial and operational reasons for business failure; risks & liabilities; skills requirements for business ownership; self-development planning; sources of advice, and support for businesses.

    2) The new business planning process and format - developing and evaluating the business idea, and producing a business plan for potential lenders.

    3) Financial aspects – budgetary planning and control; cash-flow and working capital; understanding financial accounting and key financial documents; break-even analysis; credit control, and debt recovery.

    4) Market research, competition and barriers to market entry - identifying customers; market segmentation; planning the sales and marketing processes; customer perceptions and customer care, and developing quality standards for the business

    5) Legal issues - reporting requirements; UK & EU law relevant to small businesses; business formats and trading status and their respective risks and liabilities; insurance; insolvency, and intellectual property rights such as patents and copyright.

    6) Planning and employing staff - planning and obtaining premises; physical and financial resources, and the phased implementation of the business plan.

    Read more
    15

    Teaching and assessment

    The programme involves traditional lectures, tutor- and student-led seminars, tutorials and self-directed learning. Guest speakers and involvement with external sports organisations will develop students' practical awareness and understanding of the sports industry. Strong links have been developed with sports development departments and sports providers in Kent.

    Theoretical modules are assessed through a combination of examination and coursework assessment. A number of the vocationally/practice-based modules are assessed using a combination of coursework assessment and observation.  Other methods of module assessment include presentations, reports, essays, peer assessment and time-constrained exercises.

    Programme aims

    The programme aims to provide:

    • multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary education that maximises local provision opportunities for students who seek professional careers within the field of sport management. The programme further aims to prepare them to meet the challenges of an expanding and rapidly changing industry
    • an understanding of key concepts, skills and techniques within the field of management studies and appreciation of how these are applied in the world of work
    • a curriculum that enhances student employability
    • a challenging and valuable educational experience providing students with the opportunity to learn through the integration of theory and practice
    • the level of academic knowledge and relevant professional competencies required by the sport industries
    • key transferable skills with applications in management
    • the opportunity to conduct in-depth enquiry in selected areas relevant to Sport Management
    • individuals with the ability to critically apply marketing theories in a range of different contexts, through the development of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills, research skills and personal and interpersonal skills.

    Learning outcomes

    Knowledge and understanding

    You gain knowledge and understanding of: 

    • management – the processes, procedures and practices for effective management of organisations, including theories, models, frameworks, tasks and roles of management, together with rational analysis and processes of decision making within organisations and in relation to the external
    • concepts and marketing models within a sporting context, to include the role of media and sponsorship
    • management of employees in sports industries
    • markets, customers, people, operations, communications and IT, business policy and strategy, and contemporary and pervasive issues, within the framework of the areas of ‘Organisations’, ‘External Environment’ and ‘Management’ 
    • leadership theory and styles and the relevant models
    • contemporary and pervasive issues deepening and/or integrating core knowledge
    • social processes that influence individual and group behaviour
    • the development of appropriate strategies within changing environments to meet stakeholders' interests
    • the use of a range of marketing and/or business research methods and techniques (qualitative and quantitative) and an understanding of the situations in which they should be used for providing marketers and/or managers with information to make informed decisions.

    Intellectual skills

    You gain intellectual skills in the following:

    • effective application of the skills needed for academic study and enquiry, including critical evaluation
    • effective self-management in terms of time, planning and behaviour, motivation, self-starting, individual initiative and enterprise
    • application of knowledge to the solution of familiar and unfamiliar problems, either independently or with others, in order to develop reasoned arguments and challenge assumptions
    • self-appraisal and reflection on practice
    • critical evaluation of arguments and evidence
    • recognition of and response to moral, legal, ethical and safety issues that directly pertain to the context of study
    • analytical skills necessary for the analysis of problems and the application of a systematic approach towards the identification of appropriate strategies and/or tactics
    • critical thinking and creativity; managing creative processes in self and/or others; organising thoughts; analysis, synthesis and critical appraisal
    • how to conduct research into business/management issues for project work, using a variety of sources and appropriate methodologies that inform the learning process.

    Subject-specific skills

    You gain subject-specific skills in the following areas:

    • creating, evaluating and assessing options in a range of business situations, applying concepts and knowledge appropriately
    • communicating effectively, orally and in writing, about business issues
    • the ability to conduct research into business and management issues, either individually or as part of a team, requiring familiarity with a range of business data, research sources and appropriate methodologies
    • applying and evaluating relevant managerial skills to a range of vocational and professional situations
    • Identifying, formulating and solving business /decision-making problems using appropriate qualitative and quantitative tools
    • ethical and value management, recognising ethical situations, applying ethical and organisational values to situations
    • problem solving and decision making, establishing criteria, using appropriate decision techniques including identifying, formulating and solving business/management problems; the ability to create, identify and evaluate options.

    Transferable skills

    You gain transferable skills in the following areas:

    • communicating effectively, orally and in writing, using media appropriate for the purpose
    • working in groups effectively and applying other interpersonal skills
    • problem solving 
    • time management, so as to plan and deliver required outputs effectively
    • identifying and making effective use of information from various sources to assess ideas
    • applying numeracy and IT skills appropriately
    • listening, negotiating and persuading or influencing others; oral and written communication using a range of media, including the preparation of business/management reports
    • personal effectiveness, self-awareness and self-management; sensitivity to diversity in people and in different situations, the ability to continue learning.

    Careers

    Graduate destinations

    The School of Sport and Exercise Sciences has an excellent reputation, and a graduate in Sport Management has a number of career opportunities. The degree can lead to: 

    • employment in sports development with local authorities, national or regional sports governing bodies
    • employment within public or private leisure centres, health and fitness clubs
    • posts in community leisure centres
    • self-employment as a personal trainer. 

    Additionally, you can choose further study to pursue a career in teaching (PGCE), research (MPhil/PhD) or other Master’s programmes.

    Help finding a job

    The School of Sport and Exercise Sciences has many links to professional bodies. This network is very useful to students when looking for employment.

    The University also has a friendly Careers and Employability Service which can give you advice on how to:

    • apply for jobs
    • write a good CV
    • perform well in interviews.

    Career-enhancing skills

    Combining your sports knowledge with expertise in all areas of business puts you in a strong position as you start to plan your career. Completing a fourth year of study allows you to gain more practical experience and a wider range of business expertise. In addition, you also develop the transferable skills that employers look for in a graduate. These include:

    • computing and IT
    • analysing data and problem solving
    • writing and communicating well.

    You can also enhance your degree studies by signing up for one of our Kent Extra activities, such as learning a language or volunteering.

    Independent rankings

    For graduate prospects, Sports Science at Kent was ranked 11th in The Complete University Guide 2018.

    Of Sports Science students who graduated from Kent in 2016, over 95% of
    were in work or further study within six months (DLHE).

    Entry requirements

    Home/EU students

    The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications. Typical requirements are listed below. Students offering alternative qualifications should contact us for further advice. 

    It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

    New GCSE grades

    If you’ve taken exams under the new GCSE grading system, please see our conversion table to convert your GCSE grades.

    Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
    A level

    BBB

    GCSE

    Mathematics and English grade C

    Access to HE Diploma

    The University will not necessarily make conditional offers to all Access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. 

    If we make you an offer, you will need to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

    BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

    18 units at Distinction, Distinction, Merit, plus GCSE Mathematics grade C

    International Baccalaureate

    34 points overall or 15 points at HL including Mathematics 4 at HL or SL

    International students

    The University welcomes applications from international students. Our international recruitment team can guide you on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about entry requirements for your country.

    If you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes.

    Meet our staff in your country

    For more advice about applying to Kent, you can meet our staff at a range of international events.

    English Language Requirements

    Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

    Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of 'pre-sessional' courses in English for Academic Purposes. You attend these courses before starting your degree programme. 

    General entry requirements

    Please also see our general entry requirements.

    Fees

    The 2019/20 tuition fees have not yet been set. As a guide only, the 2018/19 annual tuition fees for this programme are:

    UK/EU Overseas
    Full-time £9250 £15200
    Part-time £4625 £7600

    For students continuing on this programme, fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* 

    Your fee status

    The University will assess your fee status as part of the application process. If you are uncertain about your fee status you may wish to seek advice from UKCISA before applying.

    Additional costs

    All Students who are part of the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences  will receive a complementary uniform which includes: 1 x Tracksuit bottoms, 1  x Shorts, 1 x Hoodie, 1 x Nike Shirt once they have started the course. Although there are currently no mandatory extra costs specified for this course students do have the option to purchase extra uniform If they want to, as you might be required to wear your uniform for some practical sessions. Current cost of the uniforms are:

    Nike T-Shirt  -  £17.49
    Unisex Shorts – £10.20
    Men’s Tracksuit bottoms -£21
    Women’s Tracksuit Bottoms –£21
    Unisex Quantumn Jacket - £40
    Unisex Hurricane Jacket - £31
    Unisex Hoodie - £14.40 

    Please be aware these prices are subject to change each year

    General additional costs

    Find out more about accommodation and living costs, plus general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent.

    Funding

    University funding

    Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. See our funding page for more details. 

    Government funding

    You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

    Scholarships

    General scholarships

    Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

    The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

    At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. 

    For 2018/19 entry, the scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications (including BTEC and IB) as specified on our scholarships pages

    The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

    Full-time

    Part-time

    The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. 

    Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

    If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.