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Postgraduate Courses 2016

Modern History - MA

Canterbury and Paris

Overview

Following a similar path to our Modern History MA, the Paris option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse.

The programme focuses on the period c1500-2000, and draws on the considerable range of expertise within the School to offer a broad selection of modules, allowing you to tailor your programme to your interests. You can also study the Modern History MA at Canterbury only.

You learn from academics regarded as experts in their fields and research areas. You develop your capacity to think critically about past events, approach primary and secondary sources from a variety of perspectives and strive to understand the complex issues surrounding context and significance. In addition, you engage with the wider historiography and discourse associated with your studies, understanding the structure and nature of cultural, political and social forces in the modern period.

Think Kent video series

The famous Christmas Truce of 1914 now looms large in public perceptions of the First World War. In this lecture, Professor Mark Connelly from the University of Kent revisits this amazing event to explore Christmas 1914 in more detail and question what it tells us about the wider history of the conflict.

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of History was ranked 8th for research intensity and in the top 20 in the UK for research power.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

In Paris, you take the Paris-specific history module, England and France: Two kingdoms, two images, c1500-1700, and can choose between an historical independent research essay or select a ‘wild’ option from the range of humanities modules offered in Paris.

In the final term, you complete your MA by writing an 18-20,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with an academic supervisor.

All teaching is provided in English, by University of Kent academics.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)

This course investigates the nature of historical research at its highest level. While postgraduate students are expected to become highly specialised researchers in their own particular field or subfield, this course encourages them to consider history as a wider discipline and to broaden their approach to evidence and interpretation. Students will be expected to engage with a variety of intellectual viewpoints and methodological approaches to the discipline, and consider the impact that other disciplines have had on the study of History. A number of dissertation workshops will be arranged to help students with their dissertations.



Part I: Paradigms

Historicism: the emergence of ‘historical science’ in the 19th century

Structural history: the challenge of the social sciences

Cultural turns: history after the end of the master narrative



Part II: Fields

Religious history

Oral history

Military history

Propaganda studies

Environmental history

History of medicine



Part III: Portfolio and Dissertation workshops

Book reviews

Annotated bibliographies and historiographical reviews

Dissertation outlines



In addition, we will undertake field trips to archives and research libraries.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI915 - Landscapes of the Great War: Interpretations and Representations (30 credits)

This module will explore the way in which different academic disciplines have dealt with the three main overarching experiences of the Great War – mobilisation, attrition and endurance and remobilisation. Each week students will be exposed to the differing interpretations and will explore the major differences between them. The agreed historical facts are therefore the starting point; the harnessing and meanings is the terminus. The module convenor will be present in all sessions chairing them and facilitating the dialogue with the contributing academics. Where possible it is expected that each seminar will have multiple academic contributors. Each section will consist of a tripartite format – week one sets up the following week in special collections with the final week being reflections on what was examined in special collections and interpreted according to the approaches of different academic disciplines.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI823 - Testimonies of War: Oral History in Theory and Practice (30 credits)

This class aims to bring awareness to the possibilities of using oral history as a way of understanding the past, using the topic of twentieth-century war as a case study. It will examine the advantages and disadvantages, classic texts and theoretical and methodological insights. It also features a strong practical dimension and will provide experience in interviewing, transcription and analysis. Sessions will typically include What is Oral History?; Understanding Memory; Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity; Doing Oral History I: Plans and Preparation; Doing Oral History II: Recording, Summarising and Transcribing; Interpretation: Reconstructive Evidence and Narrative Analysis; Oral History and Public History; Fieldtrip to The Imperial War Museum; Reflecting on the Oral History interviews I and Reflecting on the Oral History interviews II.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI828 - Ireland and the First World War (30 credits)

The module will examine the experience of Ireland during the First World War. There is now considerable historiography available on Irish recruitment to the British armed forces between 1914 and 1918 and this will form the basis for three seminars; considering Nationalist and Unionist reactions to recruitment and the place of Ireland within wider UK recruitment. Political developments, caused largely by the war, namely, the decline of the Irish Parliamentary Party, rise of the Sinn Fein movement and Irish Unionisms acceptance of partition will form another important element of the module. There has been considerable work carried out on commemoration of the Great War in Ireland and Irish commemoration overseas (most notably the building of the Ulster Tower at Thiepval, France in 1921 and of the Irish Peace Park at Messines / Mesen, Belgium in 1998) and this will form the focus for two seminars. Other seminars will consider the Irish economy and the war and Irish paramilitarism between 1914 and 1918.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)

There is no better way to understand how scientific knowledge is made and consumed today than to look at how this happened in the past. Our examples come from 400 years ago up to the present day, and highlight how changes in the media of knowledge have shaped our understanding of science – printing presses, public lectures, museums and TV. How have audience needs and interests changed during this time, and how has the medium affected the message?





Themes and Topics



• The printing press and the scientific revolution

• Cabinets of curiosity: the first museums?

• Science on display in the 18th century

• Science and the steam-driven press in the 19th century

• Science and film in the 20th century

• Science wars and the public understanding of science in the late 20th century

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI874 - Religion and Society in Seventeenth-Century England (30 credits)

Religion has often been regarded as the motor for change and upheaval in 17th century England: it has been seen as the prime cause of civil war, the inspiration for the godly rule of Oliver Cromwell and ‘the Saints’, and central to the Glorious Revolution of 1688-9. Fears of popery, it has been suggested, helped forge English national identify. This module reflects critically on these claims. It explores tensions within English Protestantism, which led to an intense struggle for supremacy within the English Church in the early 17th century, to be followed in the 1640s and 1650s by the fragmentation of Puritanism into numerous competing sects which generated a remarkable proliferation of radical ideas on religion and society. The Restoration of Church and King in 1660 saw the gradual and contested emergence of a dissenting community and the partial triumph of religious tolerance, with profound implications for English society and culture. Another key theme is the changing fortunes of Anglicanism, with its erosion of its position from a national Church to the established Church over the century. The marginal position of English Catholics in 17th century England, albeit with a genuine possibility of significant recovery of rights and influence under James II, is also crucial. The module will address issues of theology, the close relationship between political power and religious change, and the nature of debates on religion at national and local level, and also track elements of continuity and change over a formative century in English religious experience.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI826 - Literary Undergrounds and Anarchists in the Basement (12 credits)

Paris as a city witnessed enormous urban and demographic expansion throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Firstly it became the preeminent centre for international intellectual exchange and the central nexus for the trade in luxury goods in Europe. Its status as a capital city only crystallised during the revolutionary decade of 1790s and since then it has remained the epitome of government centralisation. This module will chart some of these changes but will not focus solely on the development of the urban fabric of France’s capital city but rather seek to understand the site as one of the most important European hubs of the age. Indeed in the 1780s with over thirty-one foreign embassies and other diplomatic posts the French capital was both one of the largest and most impressive diplomatic centres in the world. During these centuries the city remained a major intellectual, cultural, imperial, industrial & manufacturing crossroad for continental Europe. The instability & weakness of French political institutions allowed a space for ‘free-thought’ to emerge which provided a haven for revolutionary exiles from all over the world. By studying the history of Paris this course will place such developments in their broadest political and trans-European context.

Credits: 12 credits (6 ECTS credits).

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AR814 - Architecture and Cities 1840s - 1960s (30 credits)

100% Essay (4,000 word essay)

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)

The ubiquity of the term diaspora in recent critical debates has been interpreted as the symptom of a shift in perspective in cultural and social studies. This is reflected in the growing significance of diaspora studies which, to some extent, has superseded postcolonial studies as a theoretical framework in explaining those global phenomena in society, culture and literature which are informed by conceptions of the nation state but cannot sufficiently be explained by them. At the same time, tendencies of universalising conceptions of diaspora as they have recently proliferated and the increasingly simplifying and historically undifferentiated usage of the term need to be reconsidered.



Among the various paradigms from which diasporic writing should be distinguished is the literature of exile. Exile is often the consequence of political pressure or disaffection with a society rather than the result of the larger and often spatially and chronologically extended migratory movements which led to the emergence of diasporic communities. While both paradigms may intersect, the concerns and motivations of diasporic and exilic literatures usually differ.



A historically and culturally significant geographical, and frequently also imaginary, point of intersection between the diasporic and the exilic paradigms is the metropolis of Paris. In this module, our comparative focus will be on diasporic and exilic literatures and on the significance of the diasporic or exilic space of the French metropolis, both as production context and as informing literary production.



Arguably, the most famous group of exiles to choose Paris as their temporary home was the generation of American expatriate writers in the 1920s for whom, as J. Gerald Kennedy suggests, Paris ‘inescapably reflect[ed] the creation of an exilic self’ – Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Djuna Barnes or, after the Second World War, Richard Wright, James Baldwin and Alexander Trocchi or Boris Vian. Other writers of note who, in different times and under different conditions, chose exile in Paris include Heinrich Heine, Oscar Wilde, Rainer Maria Rilke, Samuel Beckett, Heinrich Mann or Anna Seghers, Miguel Ángel Asturias, Czeslaw Milosz, Milan Kundera, Jorge Semprún and Marjane Satrapi or Julio Cortázar, Severo Sarduy, Vargas Llosa, Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Laura Alcoba, Assia Djebar, Nancy Houston and Leila Sebbar. Incorporating aesthetic dimensions, our seminars will explore in particular the extent to which experiences of diaspora and exile inform the work of ‘alien’ writers residing in Paris.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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EN899 - Paris: The Residency (30 credits)

‘Paris: The Residency’ contributes to the poetry and prose strands of the MA in Creative Writing and the Literature strand of the Paris Programmes. The objective of ‘Paris: The Residency’ is to give students as close an experience as possible of what it might be like to be a writer in residence or retreat, and to produce work inspired by a specific location for a specific period of time. The emphasis will be on producing a body of creative work for the main assessment. This module aims to enable students to develop their practice of writing through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and practices, and constructive feedback on their own work. Throughout their stay, students will be exposed to a wide range of instances of exemplary, contemporary work relating to Paris, or which was written by writers whilst staying, or living in Paris (as suggested by the indicative reading list). They will be encouraged to read as independent writers, to apply appropriate writing techniques to their own practice and to experiment with voice, form and content. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical as well as historical. At every point in the module, priority will be given to students’ own development as writers. It is an assumption of the module that students will already have a basic competence in the writing of poetry or prose, including a grasp of essential craft and techniques. The purpose of this module will be to stimulate students towards further development of, and to hone their already emerging voices and styles through engaging with various literary texts, raising an awareness of place as the starting point for new writing, and how their work can develop with large chunks of time for independent study, reflection and exploration of a city like Paris.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)

This course examines the medium of film, considering its specific qualities as an art-form and the particular ways in which it is influenced by and influences other artistic and cultural forms in its historical moment. The emphasis of the course varies from year to year, responding to current research and scholarship, but it maintains as its focus the aesthetic strategies of film in contrast with other arts, film's relationship to historical change, the interdisciplinary reach of Film Studies, and/or the particular strategies used by the cinema to communicate with its audience. The course explores both the historical place of the cinema within the development of twentieth-century culture as well as how this historical definition informs contemporary scholarship.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)

This module is designed to examine the overlapping influence of Early Modern and Enlightenment thinkers and writers mainly based in England, France and Germany. A particular focus is provided by the Parisian setting: several key figures (such as Voltaire, Rousseau and Diderot) lived in Paris for a significant part of their lives, and Paris was a city second to none in its importance within a vast international exchange of ideas during the Enlightenment period. The module will encourage students to consider the historical contexts out of which the various texts emerge, and show how ideas passed between England, France, Germany and elsewhere. Attention will consistently be paid to the tension between Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in Europe. This will include allowing the students to understand debates, in the eighteenth century (and, if appropriate, since then), around the following issues: empiricism; sensationism; toleration; freedom of speech; aesthetics; literary genres; the 'pre-Romantic'.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

The curriculum includes a selection of texts from various countries, all readily available in English and all specifically relevant to the modern history, evolving population and changing appearance of Paris and to how these aspects of the city has been perceived and represented in literary prose. The set texts are by writers from different periods and of various nationalities and they are all set in and inspired by Paris. The texts are chosen for their high literary quality, but also because they represent essential aspects of the city’s evolution and exemplify various narrative strategies and ways of engaging with the realities of life in the city, always shaped by personal preoccupations and sensibilities. This varied selection within the genre of prose fiction allows study of Zola’s naturalism and his presentation of the political and aesthetic implications of baron Haussman’s plans for urban renewal and control; Edith Wharton’s perspective as an American incomer; André Breton’s combination of oneiric urban encounters with photographic illustrations of the city, inserted into the text; Jean Rhys’s clearly gendered experience of the city in the 1920s and 1930s; the identity of the city as a site for postwar liberation and literary dynamism in the work of expatriates from the Beat generation; and the representation of today’s city as a centre for immigrant communities and cultural diversity. The primary texts are thus all Paris-focussed but are chosen to open an international perspective on the literary representation of an increasingly cosmopolitan city.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI821 - Best of Enemies: Images of Britain and France in the 19th and 20th Cent (30 credits)

‘Best of Enemies: Images of Britain and France in the 19th and 20th Centuries’ is a Modern History module which explores Anglo-French perceptions of each other in the 19th and 20th centuries, using primary texts, historical studies and a variety of visual materials including art-works, monuments, photographs, cartoons, posters and other documents. The module compares historical evidence with changing stereotypes and popular conceptions of national identities and cross-Channel alliances and competition.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • place the study of texts, images and artefacts, in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis;
  • ensure that students of modern history (ie history after 1500) acquire knowledge and understanding in the historical modes of theory and analysis
  • enable you to understand and use the concepts, approaches and methods of modern history in different academic contexts and refine their understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines
  • develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences
  • allow you to spend your first term in Canterbury, studying modules in modern history, and to spend your second term in Paris developing your understanding of French history and drawing on the sources available there (documentary, visual and cultural) to deepen your understanding of your chosen topics
  • encourage you to relate the academic study of modern history to questions of public debate and concern
  • promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate
  • assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development
  • provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study in Paris.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • the ability to understand how people have created and reacted to texts, images and artefacts in the differing contexts of the past and present
  • a comprehensive understanding of the origins and development of culture, politics and society in the modern period
  • a conceptual understanding of the structure and nature of cultural, political and social forces in the modern period, including the experience of France
  • the ability to understand historical and contemporary texts and materials both critically and empathetically while addressing questions of genre, content, perspective and purpose, with an emphasis on modern France
  • a comprehensive understanding of the problems inherent in the historical and contemporary record: a conceptual understanding that enables you to evaluate a range of viewpoints, an awareness of the limitations of knowledge and the dangers of simplistic explanations
  • a comprehensive knowledge of modern history (after 1500), from different perspectives within the discipline of history and relevant disciplines from the social sciences and humanities.

Intellectual skills

You develop intellectual skills in:

  • gathering, organising and deploying critically, evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and primary sources
  • the ability to identify, investigate and analyse critically, primary and secondary information
  • to develop reasoned defensible arguments based on reflection, study and critical judgement
  • to differentiate and evaluate arguments
  • to reflect on, and manage, your own learning and seek to make use of constructive feedback from your peers and staff to enhance your own performance and personal skills.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • understanding the nature of the socio-economic structures, cultural representations and political events in the modern period, and their significance as a global and historical human activity
  • the application of methods, concepts and theories used in the studies of history and relevant disciplines from the social sciences and humanities
  • the evaluation of different interpretations and sources
  • how to marshall an argument: summarise and defend a particular interpretation or analysis of events
  • how to acquire knowledge and understanding of French history through studying in Paris.

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: the ability to organise information clearly, respond to written sources, present information orally, adapt style for different audiences and use images as a communications tool
  • numeracy: the ability to read graphs and tables, integrate numerical and non-numerical information and understand the limits and potentialities of arguments based on quantitative information
  • information technology: how to produce written documents, undertake online research, communicate using email, process information using databases and spreadsheets (where necessary)
  • independence of mind and initiative
  • self-discipline and self-motivation
  • the ability to work with others and have respect for others’ reasoned views
  • the ability to live and work in diverse cultural environments: you will participate and work in academic communities in both Canterbury and Paris. You will thus develop cultural knowledge and understanding, flexibility, imagination, resourcefulness and tolerance.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Study support

Postgraduate resources

The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award

All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme. The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.  

Entry requirements

Minimum 2.1 or equivalent in history or a relevant subject (eg, politics, international relations, archaeology). In certain circumstances, the School will consider candidates who have not followed a conventional education path. These cases are assessed individually by the Director of Graduate Studies.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

English language entry requirements

For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. 

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history

Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history

Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine

Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website.

Dr Julie Anderson: Senior Lecturer in the History of Modern Medicine

The cultural and social history of 20th-century medicine in Britain and the Commonwealth, particularly with regard to war and medicine, surgery and disability.

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Barbara Bombi: Reader in Medieval History

Ecclesiastical and religious history, 1200-1400; canon law and history of the medieval papacy; crusades and history of the military orders; Anglo-papal relations in the 14th century; Latin diplomatic and palaeography.

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Dr Philip Boobbyer: Senior Lecturer in Modern European History

Russian and Soviet history, especially Russian religious and political philosophy.

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Dr Timothy Bowman: Senior Lecturer in British Military History

British military history in the 19th and 20th centuries; Irish history c1775-1998.

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Dr Ambrogio Caiani: Lecturer in Modern European History

European political, military and diplomatic history 1715-1848; The French Revolution; Napoleonic Europe; royal courts; constitutional monarchies’ Alexis de Tocqueville, French liberalism; political radicalism after the Congress of Vienna.

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Professor Mark Connelly: Professor of Modern British History

British modern history; British military history; the British at war from 1800; the image of war in popular culture. 

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Dr George Conyne: Lecturer in American History

American, constitutional, political and diplomatic history; Anglo-American relations; British diplomacy in the 20th century; the Cold War.

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Professor Kenneth Fincham: Professor of Early Modern History

Early modern British politics and religion; the clergy of the Anglican Church; the era of the Civil Wars.

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Dr Helen Gittos: Lecturer in Medieval History

Anglo-Saxon England, especially church history; early medieval liturgy and architecture.

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Dr Stefan Goebel: Senior Lecturer in Modern British History

Modern British and German history; war and commemoration; the impact of war on cities; collective memory; 20th-century urban history. 

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Dr Danielle van den Heuvel: Lecturer in History

The position of women in early modern Dutch society; street vending in early modern Europe; guilds, consumption and retail development.

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Dr Rebekah Higgitt: Lecturer in History of Science

History of science, especially physical sciences, in 17th to 19th-century Britain; relationship between science, government and the public; scientific institutions; popular science; biography.

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Professor Gaynor Johnson: Professor of History

The international history of the 20th century; the origins of the First and Second World Wars; international diplomacy; diplomats; the history of international peace organisations; the history of the Foreign Office.

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Dr Karen Jones: Senior Lecturer in American History

The American West; environmental history; the wolf: science and symbolism; hunting, nature and American identity; human relationships with animals; nuclear culture; parks and other tourist/heritage landscapes.

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Dr Jan Loop: Lecturer in History

The intellectual, religious and cultural history of Europe and the Near East, with a special focus on Western knowledge of the Arab, Ottoman and Persian world 1450-1800.

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Dr Giacomo Macola: Senior Lecturer in African History

Central African political and intellectual history from the 18th century to the present.

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Dr Emily Manktelow: Lecturer in African History

Central African political and intellectual history from the 18th century to the present.

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Dr Juliette Pattinson: Reader in History

Socio-cultural history, particularly the Second World War, specifically gender and oral history.

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Dr William Pettigrew: Reader in American History

England and her Atlantic colonies in the 16th to 18th centuries; the history of the British Atlantic Empire; the trans-Atlantic slave trade; race and ethnicity; the history of economic thought; Renaissance diplomacy. 

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Professor Ulf Schmidt: Professor of Modern History

German and European modern history, especially the history of medicine, eugenics and medical films during the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich and the Cold War.

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Dr Phil Slavin: Lecturer in Medieval History of Science

Environmental, economic and social history of late-medieval and early modern British Isles and the north Atlantic world.

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Dr Charlotte Sleigh: Reader in the History of Science

History and culture of the life sciences in the 19th and 20th centuries; history of natural history; literature; gender.

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Dr Leonie Wells-Furby: Lecturer in History


Anglicanism in Scotland and Ireland during the 17th century.

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Dr John Wills: Senior Lecturer in American History

Modern US history; environmental, cultural and visual history; American nuclear landscapes; California protest culture; Disney; theme parks; tourism; 1950s America; cyber-society (including video games).

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Resources

Contacts

Admissions enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

E:information@kent.ac.uk

Subject enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827279

F: +44 (0)1227 827258

E: history-admissions@kent.ac.uk

School website

Fees

The 2016/17 annual tuition fees for this programme are:

Modern History - MA at Canterbury and Paris:
UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £7310 £13340

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

Publishing Office - © University of Kent

The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000