Architecture and Urban Design - MA


The MA in Architecture and Urban Design (MAUD) proposes a particular perspective of the city, combining the strength of architectural history and theory with the study of the contemporary city, to provide an understanding of architecture and urban design that addresses the dynamic conditions of cities today.



You examine the trajectory of cities’ development, particularly in relation to the Enlightenment, industrialisation, the role of Modernisms and the conditions of the 21st century. In doing so, you draw from the wider context of humanities, cultural studies, the visual arts, drama, film and other media that influence the formation of an urban landscape.

A cross-cultural, interdisciplinary programme, you spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. In the spring term you relocate to the University of Kent, Paris, where you study at the Columbia Global Center (known as Reid Hall) in a historic corner of Montparnasse.

In Paris, all modules are taught in English and you are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. You can also take French language courses which will help you when living and studying in the heart of French culture.

There are dedicated teaching facilities with full academic guidance and support.  You also have access to some of France’s finest libraries including: the five-storey Université Diderot Paris VII,  the American Library in Paris, library facilities at the Centre Pompidou and evening access to the Bibliothèque Nationale François Mitterrand.

This is a versatile Master’s qualification for architects, urban designers, surveyors, historians, landscape architects, theorists, engineers and other related professionals involved with planning and design of contemporary cities, as well as graduates interested in pursuing further postgraduate studies and an academic career.

Architecture and Urban Design can also be studied at Canterbury only.

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of Architecture was ranked 8th for research intensity and 8th for research output in the UK.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 88% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of research of international quality.

Course structure


The MA is composed of four taught modules and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice.

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Modules may include Credits

This Module project explores broad scale issues of site and context, planning and place making. Students become familiar with relevant planning documents and learn to work as part of a team in developing design strategies and making planning proposals. Precedent studies play an important role in shaping strategic and tactical development. Communication skills are enhanced through classes including computing, and project presentations.

Urban Landscape is adapted from year to year to engage with a range of issues concerning urban landscapes and architecture and may explore topical sites within the region.

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Students are introduced to the intellectual conditions under which the research in architecture and cities (urban design) is undertaken. They are given guidance that equips them with skills to formulate their dissertation and find the way around the increasingly diverse fields of knowledge. The module enhances the ability to formulate questions, communicate arguments and results. Students will be encouraged to exercise critical attitude and formulate new proposals. Students gain experience both by presenting their own research and in providing constructive criticism on the work of their peers. The sessions confer how to present arguments, use visual resources, think through and reflect, conduct interviews and improve presentation skills.

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This module explores the idea of the city, and the major concepts related to urban life. It analyses and determines the conditions of their emergence within a broader cultural context. It traces how these concepts have changed through time, with the aim of enhancing our present understanding of cities and their regeneration. It follows the development of city planning and the establishment of planned, ideal cities as a political goal up to the foundation of new towns. In its dealing with historically modern cities, the module centres on case studies of cities representative of urbanism from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, drawing lessons from the methods and types of documentation used in its development. The course also introduces the manner in which architecture has generated a number of spontaneous and critical responses to the demands of the city in the past four decades. The arguments are drawn from sources in architectural and urban theory, philosophy, art history, anthropology, literary sources and social sciences.

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‘Paris: The Residency’ contributes to the poetry and prose strands of the MA in Creative Writing and the Literature strand of the Paris Programmes. The objective of ‘Paris: The Residency’ is to give students as close an experience as possible of what it might be like to be a writer in residence or retreat, and to produce work inspired by a specific location for a specific period of time. The emphasis will be on producing a body of creative work for the main assessment. This module aims to enable students to develop their practice of writing through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and practices, and constructive feedback on their own work. Throughout their stay, students will be exposed to a wide range of instances of exemplary, contemporary work relating to Paris, or which was written by writers whilst staying, or living in Paris (as suggested by the indicative reading list). They will be encouraged to read as independent writers, to apply appropriate writing techniques to their own practice and to experiment with voice, form and content. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical as well as historical. At every point in the module, priority will be given to students’ own development as writers. It is an assumption of the module that students will already have a basic competence in the writing of poetry or prose, including a grasp of essential craft and techniques. The purpose of this module will be to stimulate students towards further development of, and to hone their already emerging voices and styles through engaging with various literary texts, raising an awareness of place as the starting point for new writing, and how their work can develop with large chunks of time for independent study, reflection and exploration of a city like Paris.

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'Modernism and Paris' provides students with an opportunity to study a selection of texts from the UK, USA and mainland Europe, all readily available in English and specifically relevant to both Paris and modernism. The texts are all either inspired by, set in, or refer significantly to Paris and most were written in the city. They seek new and experimental literary expressions for the experience of modern city life and demonstrate a range of literary forms, including the novel, poetry, manifestos, essays and biography. In exploring the cultural contexts as well as avant-garde politics and aesthetics of modernism, the module presents texts by major authors of different nationalities, chronologically ordered, allowing students to appreciate the beginnings and development of modernism from the late 19th century to the first decades of the 20th century. It recognises the importance of modernist cross-fertilisation between literature and the visual arts and encourages students to explore links between modernist literature and the development of, for example, cubism and surrealism. The primary materials are Paris-focused but are chosen to open an international perspective on literary culture and history.

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Among the various paradigms from which diasporic writing should be distinguished is the literature of exile. Exile is often the consequence of political pressure or disaffection with a society rather than the result of the larger and often spatially and chronologically extended migratory movements which led to the emergence of diasporic communities. While both paradigms may intersect, the concerns and motivations of diasporic and exilic literatures usually differ.

A historically and culturally significant geographical, and frequently also imaginary, point of intersection between the diasporic and the exilic paradigms is the metropolis of Paris. In this module, our comparative focus will be on diasporic and exilic literatures and on the significance of the diasporic or exilic space of the French metropolis, both as production context and as informing literary production. Writers to consider include: American expatriates in 1920 (like Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Djuna Barnes), in the Post World War II era (like Richard Wright and James Baldwin), and other writers who chose exile in Paris (like Heinrich Heine, Oscar Wilde, Rainer Maria Rilke, Samuel Beckett)

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This course examines the medium of film, considering its specific qualities as an art-form and the particular ways in which it is influenced by and influences other artistic and cultural forms in the historical moment of early 20th century Paris. The emphasis of the course varies from year to year, responding to current research and scholarship, but it maintains as its focus the aesthetic strategies of film in contrast with other arts, film's relationship to historical change, particularly as it is developed in the growth of Paris as a city. The course also addresses the particular strategies used by the cinema to communicate with its historical audience. The course explores both the historical place of the cinema within the development of twentieth-century urban culture in Paris as well as how this historical definition informs the development of the cinema.

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This module is designed to examine the overlapping influence of Early Modern and Enlightenment thinkers and writers mainly based in England, France and Germany. A particular focus is provided by the Parisian setting: several key figures (such as Voltaire, Rousseau and Diderot) lived in Paris for a significant part of their lives, and Paris was a city second to none in its importance within a vast international exchange of ideas during the Enlightenment period. The module will encourage students to consider the historical contexts out of which the various texts emerge, and show how ideas passed between England, France, Germany and elsewhere. Attention will consistently be paid to the tension between Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in Europe. This will include allowing the students to understand debates, in the eighteenth century (and, if appropriate, since then), around the following issues: empiricism; sensationism; toleration; freedom of speech; aesthetics; literary genres; the 'pre-Romantic'.

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The curriculum includes a selection of texts from various countries, all readily available in English and all specifically relevant to the modern history, evolving population and changing appearance of Paris and to how these aspects of the city has been perceived and represented in literary prose. The set texts are by writers from different periods and of various nationalities and they are all set in and inspired by Paris. The texts are chosen for their high literary quality, but also because they represent essential aspects of the city’s evolution and exemplify various narrative strategies and ways of engaging with the realities of life in the city, always shaped by personal preoccupations and sensibilities. This varied selection within the genre of prose fiction allows study of Zola’s naturalism and his presentation of the political and aesthetic implications of baron Haussman’s plans for urban renewal and control; Edith Wharton’s perspective as an American incomer; André Breton’s combination of oneiric urban encounters with photographic illustrations of the city, inserted into the text; Jean Rhys’s clearly gendered experience of the city in the 1920s and 1930s; the identity of the city as a site for postwar liberation and literary dynamism in the work of expatriates from the Beat generation; and the representation of today’s city as a centre for immigrant communities and cultural diversity. The primary texts are thus all Paris-focussed but are chosen to open an international perspective on the literary representation of an increasingly cosmopolitan city.

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In this module you will learn further techniques of writing fiction, including how to plot a full-length novel, work on deep characterisation and the construction of an intellectual framework within your fiction. You may be continuing to work on a project begun in Fiction 1, or starting something new. Rather than expecting you to try new techniques, voices and styles, your tutor will work with you to identify your strongest mode of writing and will encourage you to develop this.

Your tutor will supply you with a reading list before the start of the module.

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The main focus of Poetry 2 is to further develop and refine your writing with the eventual aim of producing a successful dissertation portfolio of fully realised, finished poems. Poetry 2 differs from Poetry 1 in that you are encouraged to develop a sequence or series of wholly new poems.

In this module you will develop your practice of writing poetry through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and constructive feedback on your own work. Each week, you will be exposed to a wide range of exemplary, contemporary sequences. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical rather than historical; at every point priority is given to your own particular development as poets.

The reading list does not represent a curriculum as such, but indicates the range of works and traditions we will draw upon to stimulate new thought about your own work. Decisions about reading will be taken in response to individual interests. Likewise, you will be directed toward work which will be of particular benefit to you.

The main focus of Poetry 2 is to further develop and refine your writing with the eventual aim of producing a successful dissertation portfolio of fully realised, finished poems. Poetry 2 differs from Poetry 1 in that you are encouraged to develop a sequence or series of wholly new poems.

In this module you will develop your practice of writing poetry through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and constructive feedback on your own work. Each week, you will be exposed to a wide range of exemplary, contemporary sequences. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical rather than historical; at every point priority is given to your own particular development as poets.

The reading list does not represent a curriculum as such, but indicates the range of works and traditions we will draw upon to stimulate new thought about your own work. Decisions about reading will be taken in response to individual interests. Likewise, you will be directed toward work which will be of particular benefit to you.

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From the French Revolution to the European Union, the term 'Europe' has long been a placeholder for a large number of utopian, internationalist aspirations. These aspirations are necessarily culturally and politically contingent; to trace the history of cultural constructions of Europe is to hold a mirror up to its changing intellectual faces. Focusing on a series of influential texts published at significant moments in the recent history of the continent, this module investigates how the changing ‘idea of Europe’ reflects the changing priorities of cultural discourse. In particular, it considers the key role – but also contested – played by Paris in particular as a European cultural capital, central to the idea of Europe and to the development of European culture. The texts studied on this module range across disciplines and genres, and include poems and pamphlets, essays and lectures, philosophy and politics. Through studying these texts in their socio-political contexts, the idea of Europe is triangulated through reference to a number of key categories (e.g. ‘prophecy’; ‘crisis’; ‘utopia’; Europe as ‘conservative’; Europe as ‘progressive’). The overall aim of this module is to explore what it means to be – in Friedrich Nietzsche’s words – a ‘good European’, and to consider the central role played by Paris in the emergence of modern European culture.

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In recent decades European intellectual culture has seen a turn towards the post-secular, the post-critical, the “return” of religion, or, as Claude Lefort described it “the permanency of the theologico-political”. Such gestures invite a rethinking of the political, social, and intellectual role of “religion” in the recent history of European thought. Such reworking intimately affects the understanding of Europe within a scene of global political and economic development, European traditions of philosophy, concepts of political autonomy; its critical theories of culture and economy, links between the idea of Europe and democratic political foundations; and the nature of artistic, social, and psychological exploration. This course creates capacities to interact with and to intervene in these important and on-going cultural discussions by developing new maps of “religion” as a central preoccupation in the formation of European intellectual identity, with a strong focus on Paris and the history of religion in “French theory” (e.g the works of Badiou, Benslama, Derrida and Foucault).

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Students are asked to propose and formulate their own dissertation which could include diverse methodological approaches as well as critique of urban design. Depending on their subject, students undertake the study of specific urban contexts, archives or the interpretation of textual and visual materials, the visualisation of parametric data and formulation of results. The commitment is to develop new methodologies that challenge the boundaries of research in urban design.

The dissertation will normally be 10,000-15,000 words long and will include necessary visual material and where appropriate new urban design proposals.

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Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • ensure that you achieve excellence in your knowledge of architecture and cities through the development of your understanding, research, design and other related abilities
  • promote creativity and excellence in architecture and urban design; from understanding concepts to thoughtful project development and the integration of research, strategically and in detail
  • develop your knowledge of the theoretical, historical and professional contexts of architecture and urban design and ensure that you are aware of your responsibilities
  • develop your understanding of architecture, cities and urban design within a broader cultural context that would include studies of arts and humanities
  • promote and support independent research and high-quality skills
  • accommodate a wide range of views and develop your specialised original interests
  • develop understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research and promote originality in applying knowledge in architecture and urban design
  • develop initiative, responsibility and sound critical judgement in making decisions about complex architectural and urban design issues
  • enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning
  • support you in achieving your full potential in all parts of the programme
  • enable you to learn from the direct experience of the city and the wealth of its resources as this programme will be partly based in Paris. 

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • the ways in which human activities shape and influence the environment and how the physical environment in turn affects and influences humans
  • the complexity of circumstances and constraints to which architecture and urban design has to respond
  • the histories and theories of urban design, architecture, the history of ideas, and the related disciplines of art, cultural studies and landscape studies and their application in critical debate
  • a critical awareness of the nature of architecture, cities, and conditions of emergence of urban space, in all its manifestations, including buildings, infrastructure, open spaces and landscape
  • a conceptual understanding that enables you to develop strategies and/or sound urban design proposals for new architecture and urban areas and the improvement of existing ones, in ways that are socially and culturally agreeable, economically viable and environmentally sustainable.

Intellectual skills

You develop intellectual skills in:

  • the ability to develop analytical and critical skills in the understanding of architecture and urban transformation applied to urban areas in relation to social, historical, organisational and political processes
  • the ability to independently define and appraise ideas in architecture and urban design and form considered judgements about spatial, aesthetic, technical and the social qualities of an urban context within the scope and scale of a wider environment
  • the ability to question and critically evaluate past and current design methods and tools
  • the ability to refer to, and analyse, case studies competently
  • the ability to speculate and apply relevant research to the proposed design ideas, development and tasks
  • the ability to formulate a research proposal with its appropriate methodology
  • the ability to develop strategic proposals/masterplans that deal with the built environment in a culturally sensitive, socially just, and environmentally and economically sustainable manner.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • the ability to produce documentation and clear, analytical reports covering a range of issues in relation to culture theory and urban design
  • the ability to use visual, verbal and written communication and appropriate media (including sketching, digital and audiovisual) to present critical appraisal and analysis of design proposals to professional and general audiences
  • the ability to formulate viable, original and well-supported design proposals and advice aimed at dealing with the complexity of urban contexts
  • the ability to acquire advanced negotiation skills and professional attitudes in dealing with stakeholders
  • the ability to acquire research skills including the formulation of a conceptual framework and use of a range of information sources
  • the ability to develop excellent graphic and other visual presentation skills to be applied to the design projects or the submission of written reports
  • the ability to understand how big cities work and develop.

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • the ability to prepare and manage well-supported critical analyses (written, visual and oral) based on theory and empirical evidence
  • the ability to challenge conventional wisdom and provide advice
  • the ability to reflect critically on your own ideas by becoming more open and acquainted with unfamiliar ideas and practices
  • the ability to work effectively in a multidisciplinary, multicultural environment
  • the ability to negotiate and work as part of a team
  • the ability to systematically plan, carry through and manage a project programme in a given time
  • the ability to be self-critical about your own work and constructive in how to address and progress it
  • the ability to live and study in another country and adapt to different structure of resources.


Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Study support

Postgraduate resources

The School of Architecture studios include a dedicated computing suite with a range of environmental construction software, and a new digital crit studio. There is a fully equipped architectural model-making workshop for constructing models and large-scale prototypes.

Professional links

The School has excellent contacts with businesses and culture in the local area, including regional organisations such as the Kent Architecture Centre, Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), Kent County Council and Kent Design Initiative. The Sustainable Communities Plan is particularly strong in south-east England, making the region the ideal place in which to debate innovative solutions to architectural issues.

Kent also has excellent links with schools of architecture in Lille, Bruges, Rome, Bauhaus-Dessau, Beijing and, in the USA, Virginia and California.

Academic study is complemented by a mentoring scheme organised in collaboration with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and involving students in events with local practices.

Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Architectural Research Quarterly; The Architectural Review; Building and Environment; The Journal of Architecture; and The World of Interiors.

Global Skills Award

All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme. The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.  

Entry requirements

A first or good second class honours degree (or the equivalent) in architecture or another related discipline in humanities, planning or similar. Those without the degree will be considered for entry on an individual basis but must be able to show a considerable period of experience at an appropriate level.

All applicants are considered on an individual basis and additional qualifications, and professional qualifications and experience will also be taken into account when considering applications. 

International students

Please see our International Student website for entry requirements by country and other relevant information for your country. 

English language entry requirements

The University requires all non-native speakers of English to reach a minimum standard of proficiency in written and spoken English before beginning a postgraduate degree. Certain subjects require a higher level.

For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. 

Need help with English?

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

Research areas

Research centres

KSA has two research centres: the Centre for Research in European Architecture (CREAte), which focuses on research in architectural humanities and design, and the Centre for Architecture and Sustainable Environment (CASE), which promotes research in the field of sustainable architecture.


The Centre provides a focus for research in architecture in the European context. Its emphasis is on the role and contribution of humanities to architecture and urban design in the context of urban and regional regeneration, nationally and internationally.

CREAte provides a platform for evening lectures by contemporary architects and scholars; hosting debates and events that are at the heart of architectural agenda of today.

The Centre builds upon its staff specialisms, interests and skills in the following areas: regional studies, contemporary architectural and urban theory and design, architectural history and theory (ranging from antiquity to contemporary European cities), sustainability, European topographies (landscape, urban, suburban and metropolitan) etc. Staff participate in the activities of AHRA – Architecture Humanities Research Association and are internationally published authors.


The Centre promotes research in the field of sustainable environment regionally, nationally and internationally.

Its research focus encompasses different aspects and scales of the sustainable built environment from the individual building to the urban block, promoting the wider environmental agenda and keeping the School at the forefront of research and development in the field. CASE also pursues research into the historical and cultural dimension of environmental design to foster links between the sciences, arts and humanities. There is a strong interest in understanding the environmental behaviour of historic buildings and the strategies originally deployed to manage the internal environment.

The Centre has already secured funding from various sources. This includes three EPSRC projects on climate change weather data for a sustainable built environment, sustainability of airport terminal buildings and design interventions in the public realm for affecting human behaviour, and two TSB-funded projects on Building Performance Evaluation. CASE is also involved with the recent EPSRC large-scale network on Digital Economy Communities and Culture.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website.

Professor Gerry Adler: Deputy Head of School; Programme Director: MA Architecture and Urban Design (Canterbury and Paris)

Twentieth-century architectural history and theory, in particular in Great Britain and Germany; Heinrich Tessenow; architecture in its wider cultural and philosophical contexts; the place of the ruin in the modern architectural imagination. 

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Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin: Senior Lecturer in Cultural Context

Nineteenth and early-20th century English architecture and, in particular, the work of A W N Pugin.

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Dr Luciano Cardellicchio: Lecturer in Design and Technology & Environment

The relationship between form and construction; the connection among technical details, urban shape and construction tradition in contemporary architecture in Europe and modern architecture in Italy.

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Professor Gordana Fontana-Giusti: Professor of Architecture and Urban Regeneration

Contemporary architectural and urban theory, in particular philosophy and its relation to architecture; perspective and its relation to architecture and the city; representation, conceptual art and the relationship between the arts and architecture; regeneration, public spaces and sustainable urban design; urban landscapes, cities and water.

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Dr Manolo Guerci: Senior Lecturer in Cultural Context and Design; Director of Graduate Studies

Secular architecture, particularly domestic, ranging from Early-Modern European palaces with emphasis on connections between Italy, France and Britain in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, to post-war social housing estates; relations between European Modernism and traditional Japanese architecture; conservation of historic buildings, particularly 17th-century construction techniques in Rome.

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Dr David Haney: Senior Lecturer in Cultural Context and Design; Director CREAte Research Centre

Relationship between landscape and architecture considered from both professional and cultural perspectives; history of modern architecture and landscape; history of ‘green’ or ecological design; ecological concepts in German modernism.

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Dr Nikolaos Karydis: Lecturer; Programme Director, Architectural Conservation MSc

Development of construction technology and the design aspect of city making, with specific focus on the European traditions; urban development in Early Modern Rome and the ways in which specific building projects of the 16th and the 17th centuries conditioned urban renewal.

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Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou: Professor of Sustainable Architecture; Programme Director, Architecture and Sustainable Environments MSc; Director of CASE Research Centre

Comfort of complex environments; urban microclimate; occupant perception and use of space; sustainable design and rational use of energy in the built environment.

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Dr Giridharan Renganathan: Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture

Urban morphology and climatology (environmental design), with specific interest in the urban heat island (UHI) effect; outdoor thermal comfort; summer time over heating in buildings; passive ventilation strategies; use of cool materials.

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Michael Richards: Senior Lecturer in Design; Programme Director, MArch

Design studio pedagogy in the area of ethics; the variances between the physical and fictional relative locations of ‘place’ in cinema; the implications for an understanding of contemporary cities.

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Dr Richard Watkins: Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture

Urban microclimate and the urban heat island, refrigeration, air movement and air quality; daylighting; climate change; future weather data; building performance modelling and measurement.

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The 2018/19 annual tuition fees for this programme are:

Architecture and Urban Design - MA at Canterbury and Paris:
UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £8250 £15200

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact

General additional costs

Find out more about general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent. 


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