Developing and implementing interventions - TZ902

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2019-20
Canterbury Spring and Summer
View Timetable
7 20 (10)

Pre-requisites

The programmes of study to which the module contributes:

MSc in Applied Behaviour Analysis (Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities)
Post Graduate Diploma in Applied Behaviour Analysis (Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities)
Post Graduate Certificate in Applied Behaviour Analysis (Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities)
MSc in Positive Behaviour Support (Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities)

Restrictions

None

2019-20

Overview

The aim of this module is to develop advanced understanding of the design and implementation of positive strategies to improve the behavioural and psychological functioning of vulnerable populations, and their support by carers and others.
Topics will include:
Approaches to increasing the frequency of behaviour
Approaches to developing new behaviour
Using assessment information to inform intervention planning
Design of behaviour support plans, instructional strategies and appropriately prosthetic environmental arrangements
Precision teaching, direct instruction and group contingencies
Barriers to implementation
Procedural reliability
Generalisation and maintenance

Details

Contact hours

Total contact hours: 45
Private study hours: 155
Total study hours: 200

Availability

Spring and Summer

Method of assessment

100% coursework comprising:

Assignment (report) 1 (2500 words) – 50%
Examination (2 hours) or coursework - assignment 2 (report) (2500 words) – 50%

Indicative reading

Bailey, J. S., & Burch, M. R. (2010, 2nd Ed). Ethics for behavior analysts: a practical guide to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board guidelines for responsible conduct. London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Brown, F., Anderson, J.L. and Dr Pry, R.L. (2015). Individual Positive Behaviour Support: a standards-based guide to use in school and community settings. Baltimore: Brookes.

Cooper, J.O., Heron, T.E., Heward, W.L. (2007, 2nd Ed.) Applied Behaviour Analysis. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill-Prentice Hall.

Emerson, E., & Einfeld, S. L. (2011). Challenging behaviour (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kubina, R. M., & Yurich, K. K. L. (2012). The precision teaching book. Lemont, PA: Greatness Achieved Publishing Company.

Rehfeldt, R. A., & Barnes-Holmes, Y. (2009). Derived relational responding applications for learners with autism and other developmental disabilities: A progressive guide to change. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Sulzer-Azaroff, B., & Mayer, G. R. (1991). Behavior analysis for lasting change. Belmont, Ca: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

Learning outcomes

On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1. Describe and discuss at an advanced level the relationship between functional assessment/analysis and the development of behaviour analytic interventions.
2. Describe and discuss at an advanced level a range of approaches to develop new behaviour/increase existing behaviour including: prompting; shaping; chaining; modelling; incidental teaching; discrimination training; precision teaching.
3. Describe and critically evaluate the processes by which functionally-based behavioural interventions to develop new behaviour and/or increase the occurrence of existing behaviours may be designed, implemented and evaluated.
4. Describe and discuss in depth approaches to reducing and replacing challenging behaviour from a range including: antecedent manipulations; functional communication training; differential reinforcement; non-contingent reinforcement; extinction; punishment; contingency contracts and token systems; self-management.
5. Describe and critically evaluate the processes by which functionally-based behavioural interventions to reduce and replace challenging behaviour may be designed, implemented and evaluated.
6. Describe and discuss at an advanced level maintenance and generalisation of behavioural intervention including issues of systems support.

On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1. Effectively integrate complex knowledge from different sources, including published work and personal experience
2. Demonstrate the ability to understand, and communicate in writing, complex, abstract concepts.
3. Show a capacity to effectively prioritise the demands of work and study.
4. Use information technology to a high level (word processing, email, Moodle, e-journals and other online resources).
5. Develop an in-depth plan for intervention with the behaviour of an individual with intellectual and developmental disabilities, requiring the identification, definition and solution of difficult problems.

University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that module information is accurate for the relevant academic session and to provide educational services as described. However, courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Please read our full disclaimer.