Gender in Conflicts, Migration and Development - PO944

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Brussels
(version 3)
Spring
View Timetable
7 20 (10)

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

This module will explore the various intersections between gender and conflict: how masculinities and femininities are constructed in times of conflict and war, the impact of these constructions within the conflict/post-conflict context, and how gender and ethnicity are used in narratives and political discourses. We will discuss the relationships between gender, militarism and war, between gender and power, and more generally between gender and social structures. The goal for this course is to analyse the relationship between conflict and gender. This course also aims at understanding the differing impact of conflict on women and on men and the diverging meanings of conflict and security for women and men.

Gender refers to the socially constructed roles, behaviours, norms, and so forth, which affect how both males and females, or rather how masculinities and femininities are defined or understood within society. A gender relations approach examines the interplay between masculinities and femininities. While feminism increased the attention to gender-related issues, most notably in regards to females, more recent men and masculinities research has offered a complementary understanding of how gender and gender relations affect us all.

Conflict-related policies such as UNSC 1325, and more generally the broader focus on gender mainstreaming, gender specialists and gender trainers, have further emphasised its centrality to conflict research. The changing nature of conflict itself, including civilians increasingly being targeted, rape as a weapon of war, and both female and male combatants, necessitates a more complex approach, which takes gender into account.

Details

This module appears in:


Availability

Autumn

Method of assessment

Students write one essay of approximately 5000 words answering questions related to the topics dealt with in the seminars. The essay is worth 100% of the final mark.

Preliminary reading

Anderlini Sanam Naraghi (2007), Women Building Peace, What they do, Why it Matters, Boulder, Lynne Rienner.
Cockburn Cynthia (2007), From Where We Stand: War, Women's Activism & Feminist Analysis, London, Zed Books.
Eager Paige Whaley (2008), From Freedom Fighters to Terrorists, Women and Political Violence, Aldershot, Ashgate.
Eisenstein Zillah (2007), Sexual Decoys: Gender, Race, and War in Imperial Democracy, London, Zed Books.
Enloe Cynthia (2000), Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives, Berkeley, University of California Press.
Goldstein Joshua S. (2001), War and Gender, How Gender Shapes the War System and Vice Versa, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Kampwirth Karen (2002), Women and Guerrilla Movements, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Chiapas, Cuba, University Park, Pennsylvania University Press.
Kaufmann Joyce P., Williams Kristen P. (2007), Women, The State, and War. A Comparative Perspective on Citizenship and Nationalism, Lanham, Lexington Books.
Lentin Ronit (ed.) (1997), Gender and Catastrophe, London, Zed Books.
Mazurana Dyan, Raven-Roberts Angela, Parpart Jane (2005), Gender, Conflict and Peacekeeping, London, Rowman and Littlefield.
McDonald Eileen (1991), Shoot the Women First, New York, Random House.
Meintjes Sheila, Pillay Anu, Turshen Meredeth (eds.) (2002), The Aftermath, Women in Post-Conflict Transformation, London, Zed Books.
Moser Caroline O.N., Clark Fiona C., (eds.) (2001), Victims, Perpetrators or Actors? Gender, Armed Conflict and Political Violence, London, Zed Books.
Ness Cindy (2008), Female Terrorism and Militancy. Agency, Utility and Organisation, London, Routledge.
Sjoberg Laura, Gentry Caron E. (2007), Mothers, Monsters, Whores, Women’s Violence in Global Politics, London, Zed Books.
Sutton Barbara, Morgen Sandra, and Novkov Julie (eds.) (2008), Critical Perspectives on Gender, Race, and Militarization, New Brunswick, Rutgers University Press.
Yuval-Davis Nira (1997), Gender and Nation, London, Sage.

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to
SLO1: Explain and use key concepts in the theory and practice of gender and conflicts
SLO2: Critically assess theories related to gender in conflicts and their interpretations in respect to the various stages of the conflict cycle
SLO3: Understand how masculinity and femininity work in times of conflict and war to create soldiers, combatants and support among the civilian population
SLO4: Draw on a variety of sources of information on international conflicts and gender issues, including on-line resources
SLO5: Assess the impact of international policies and initiatives aiming at "mainstreaming gender" in peacekeeping and peace-building
SLO6: Identify the relationship between gender and power, and more generally between gender and the social structure

These specific learning outcomes contribute to achieving the learning outcomes of our post-graduate programmes by demonstrating knowledge of the following:
A.1. key historical and theoretical issues in international conflict and the study of war and peace, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources (SLO1,2,3,4);
A.2. how to apply general theoretical and conceptual frameworks to the analysis of specific conflicts and security issues (SLO1,2,3);
A.3.the nature and distribution of power in the international systems; problems of political order; the social, economic, historical and cultural context within which actors operate (SLO3,5,6);
A.4. the different kinds of actors on the international scene, their respective interests and influence in conflict and security related issues (SLO 2,3,5);
A.6. current political challenges to international peace and security and possible strategies to address them (SLO 2,3,5);
A.7. the changing role of the state in the context of globalisation and regional integration and the implications for international peace and security (SLO5,6);
B.1. general research skills, especially bibliographic and computing skills (SLO1-6);
B.2. gather, organize and deploy evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources (SLO1-6);
B.3. identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems (SLO1-6);
B.4. develop reasoned arguments, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement (SLO1-6)
C.1. advanced understanding the nature and significance of conflict as a human condition (SLO1-6);
C.2. ability to critically apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of conflict to the analysis of political events, ideas, institutions and practices (SLO1-6);
C.3. ability to critically evaluate different interpretations of political issues and events (SLO2,3,5,6)
C.4. ability to collect, analyse and present information about conflict and political events (SLO 2,3,4,5)
C.5. awareness of the epistemological issues relevant to research in the social sciences, including the major theoretical and epistemological debates in the social sciences, as they bear on international conflict analysis (SLO1,2)
D.1. Communication: communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing (including, where appropriate, the use of IT); organise information clearly and coherently; use communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information, including, where appropriate, statistical or numerical information (SLO4)
D.5. Problem solving: identify and define problems; explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them (SLO2,3,5)

The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this module:
GLO1: will be able to work with theoretical knowledge at the forefront of their discipline
GLO2: will be aware of the ethical dimensions of the scholarly work done in their discipline in general as well as of their own work in particular
GLO3: will have a comprehensive understanding of methods and methodologies in their discipline
GLO4: will be able to undertake analysis of complex, incomplete or contradictory areas of knowledge
GLO5: will have a level of conceptual understanding that will allow them to critically evaluate research, advanced scholarship and methodologies and argue alternative approaches
GLO6: will be reflective and self-critical in their research work
GLO7: will be able to engage in academic and professional communication orally and in writing
GLO8: will have independent learning ability required for continuing professional study

By helping students to progress towards these subject-specific outcomes, the module contributes to achieving the following Programme Learning Outcomes (PLO):
A.1. key historical and theoretical issues in international conflict and the study of war and peace, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources (GLO1,4);
A.2. how to apply general theoretical and conceptual frameworks to the analysis of specific conflicts and security issues (GLO1,3,4,5);
A.5. key theoretical problems of war and peace (GLO1);
A.8. how to design and conduct a research project demonstrating awareness of epistemological and methodological principles (GLO2,3,4,5,6,7);
A.9. how to carry out an independent research project and write in a scholarly manner demonstrating familiarity with academic conventions (GLO1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)
B.1. general research skills, especially bibliographic and computing skills (GLO3,8);
B.3. identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems (GLO3,4,5,6,7,8);
B.4. develop reasoned arguments, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement (GLO2,3,4,5,6)
B.6. manage their own learning self-critically (GLO6)
C.1. advanced understanding the nature and significance of conflict as a human condition (GLO1,4);
C.2. ability to critically apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of conflict to the analysis of political events, ideas, institutions and practices (GLO1,2,3,4,5);
C.3. ability to critically evaluate different interpretations of political issues and events (GLO4,5);
C.5. awareness of the epistemological issues relevant to research in the social sciences, including the major theoretical and epistemological debates in the social sciences, as they bear on international conflict analysis (GLO1,2,4,5)
D.1. Communication: communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing (including, where appropriate, the use of IT); organise information clearly and coherently; use communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information, including, where appropriate, statistical or numerical information (GLO6,7,8);
D.4. Improving own learning: explore personal strengths and weaknesses; time management; review working environment (especially student-staff relationship); develop autonomy in learning; work independently, demonstrating initiative and self-organisation. Important research management skills include the setting of appropriate timescales for different stages of the research with clear starting and finishing dates (through a dissertation); presentation of a clear statement of the purposes and expected results of the research; and developing appropriate means of estimating and monitoring resources and use of time (GLO6,7,8);
D.5. Problem solving: identify and define problems; explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them (GLO5,6,8).

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