Foundations of Language 2: Structure and Meaning - LING3110

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Module delivery information

This module is not currently running in 2021 to 2022.

Overview

This module introduces linguistic approaches to the study of language structure, language meaning and communication. For language structure, the module provides an overview of the major grammatical properties of English (e.g. lexical classes, grammatical functions, phrase and sentence structure), and provides students with analytical tools for understanding and constructing arguments about linguistic structure (e.g. morpho-syntactic tests, constituency tests). For meaning, the module introduces students to lexical semantics (the meanings of words and characteristics of word classes) and sentential semantics (how the meanings of words and phrases combine to create propositional meaning). In addition, the module covers introductory topics in pragmatics, focusing on context dependence and the differences between semantic and pragmatic meaning. . The relationships among related but distinct notions such as grammar, inference, and communication are discussed throughout. The module is particularly useful for students who are studying linguistics, psychology, anthropology, language(s), or literature, as it provides them with analytical skills for understanding language and language-related behavior.

This module introduces linguistic approaches to the study of language structure, language meaning and communication. For language structure, the module provides an overview of the major grammatical properties of English (e.g. lexical classes, grammatical functions, phrase and sentence structure), and provides students with analytical tools for understanding and constructing arguments about linguistic structure (e.g. morpho-syntactic tests, constituency tests). For meaning, the module introduces students to lexical semantics (the meanings of words and characteristics of word classes) and sentential semantics (how the meanings of words and phrases combine to create propositional meaning). In addition, the module covers introductory topics in pragmatics, focusing on context dependence and the differences between semantic and pragmatic meaning. . The relationships among related but distinct notions such as grammar, inference, and communication are discussed throughout. The module is particularly useful for students who are studying linguistics, psychology, anthropology, language(s), or literature, as it provides them with analytical skills for understanding language and language-related behaviour

Details

Contact hours

This module will be taught in two sessions, consisting of one lecture and one two hour-seminar.

Method of assessment

Assessment is 70% coursework 30% Exam

Indicative reading

Blakemore, D (1992) Understanding Utterances. Oxford: Blackwell

Burton-Roberts, N. (1997). Analysing Sentences: An Introduction to English Syntax. London: Longman

Huddleston, R. & G. K. Pullum (2005). A Student's Introduction to English Grammar. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Lyons, J (1995) Linguistic Semantics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Saeed, J (2003) Semantics. Oxford: Blackwell

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this module will be able to:
a) Understand the major characteristics of English grammar
b) Select and apply appropriate terminology to describe and analyse the structure and systems of English, e.g. noun, verb, clause, phrase, aspect, adjunct, complement
c) Understand the properties of words, structures and longer stretches of language used to convey meaning
d) Develop an awareness of the nature of theory and what constitutes an explanation
e) Understand concepts and terminology used to account for the way in which meanings are conveyed, focusing on the distinction between linguistically encoded meaning (semantics) and context-dependent interpretation (pragmatics)
f) Explore a number of distinct established core theoretical frameworks used to account for word meaning and lexical relations, including decompositional accounts and those based on meaning postulates
g) Demonstrate familiarity with distinctions between propositional content and illocutionary force, and theories of sentence meaning and sentence relations

Notes

  1. ECTS credits are recognised throughout the EU and allow you to transfer credit easily from one university to another.
  2. The named convenor is the convenor for the current academic session.
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