Athenian Power Plays - CL713

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2019-20
Canterbury Autumn
View Timetable
5 30 (15) DR R Wyles

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

None

2019-20

Overview

This module explores 5th-century Athenian history through the plays which were put on stage during this period of war and political upheaval. Greek tragedies and comedies produced during this tumultuous period (472-405 BC) offer us some of the most enticing, yet challenging, evidence for the state of Athenian politics and attitudes to contemporary events (especially war and empire). In this module, the evidence of key plays will be set against other forms of historical evidence to illuminate the complex relationship between the types of evidence which survive and the nature of 'making history'.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

Total Contact Hours: 30

Availability

Also available under code CL714 (Level 6)

Method of assessment

• Essay (2,000 words) – 60%
• Examination (2 hours) – 40%

Indicative reading

Indicative Reading List

C. Collard (2008), Aeschylus Oresteia. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
J. Davie (1998), Euripides Suppliant Women, Trojan Women in Electra and Other Plays. London: Penguin.
A. De Selincourt (2003) Herodotus The Histories (especially Books 6-9) in The Histories Revised. London: Penguin.
A. Sommerstein (2003), Aristophanes Acharnians, Lysistrata in Aristophanes Lysistrata and Other Plays. London: Penguin.
R. Warner (2000). Thucydides History of the Peloponnesian War. London: Penguin.

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

Learning outcomes

On successfully completing the module Level 5 students will be able to:
- Articulate responses to key questions about the nature and value of the dramatic evidence for 5th century Athenian history;
- Understand the importance and implications of ancient drama within its historical context;
- Comprehend the conceptual nuances (and ambiguities) of key ancient Greek terms used within the dramas studied and prevalent in the political discussions of the time;
- Demonstrate critical, specific and in-depth analyses of these issues;
- Engage reflectively with other people's analyses and interpretations of primary and secondary sources.

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