Centre for Health Services Studies

Excellence in Health Research


profile image for Professor Stephen Peckham BSc (Hons), MA  (Econ), HMFPH

Professor Stephen Peckham BSc (Hons), MA (Econ), HMFPH

Director & Professor of Health Policy

 

 

I am Director of CHSS and Professor of Health Policy at CHSS and also in the Department of Health Services Research and Policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

I am also currently Director of the Department of Health funded Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System (PRUComm) a collaborative research unit with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Manchester. PRUComm is undertaking research on the development of Clinical Commissioning Groups, contracting, competition and the development of the new Public Health System in England. I am undertaking research on healthcare commissioning and patient and public involvement.

I was recently appointed Associate Professor in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME) at the University of Toronto.

I have over 20 years of policy analysis and health services research experience. I have particular interests in the way services are organized and delivered and examining the development and implementation of health policy. I am also interested in the use of evidence in policy and public health and ethical implications of public health policies.

Much of my research has focused on the organization of primary care and its role in commissioning healthcare. I have substantial experience of undertaking qualitative and mixed methods research. I have been the principal investigator on large multi-centre programme grants and am involved in international projects examining models of primary care and primary care accountability.

I joined CHSS in July 2012 from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine where I had worked for seven years. Previously I held posts at Oxford Brookes University, the University of the West of England and the University of Southampton.  Before that I worked for several years in the voluntary sector and before going to University in 1982, I worked for nine years in local government.

I completed my BSc in Social Sciences at the University of Southampton in 1985 and a Masters in Public Policy Analysis at the University of Manchester in 1988.

I am a member of the Social Policy Association, the Canadian Association of Health Services Policy and Research and an honorary member of the Faculty of Public Health.

 

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Also view these in the Kent Academic Repository

Article
Sheaff, R. et al. (2017). Bridging the discursive gap between lay and medical discourse in care coordination. Sociology of Health & Illness [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9566.12553.
Gadsby, E. et al. (2017). Commissioning for health improvement following the 2012 health and social care reforms in England: what has changed? BMC Public Health [Online] 17:1-11. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4122-1.
Peckham, S. (2016). Decentralisation A Portmanteau Concept that Promises Much but Fails to Deliver? Comment on "Decentralisation of Health Services in Fiji: A Decision Space Analysis. International Journal of Health Policy and Management [Online] 5:729-732. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/ijhpm.2016.88.
Jenkins, L. et al. (2015). Integration, influence and change in public health: findings from a survey of Directors of Public Health in England. Journal of Public Health [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdv139.
Peckham, S. et al. (2015). The organisation and delivery of health improvement in general practice and primary care: a scoping study. Health Services and Delivery Research [Online] 3. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3310/hsdr03290.
Smiddy, J. et al. (2015). Developing patient reference groups within general practice: a mixed-methods study. British Journal of General Practice [Online] 65:e177-e183. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3399/bjgp15X683989.
Peckham, S., Lowery, D. and Spencer, S. (2015). Are fluoride levels in drinking water associated with hypothyroidism prevalence in England? A large observational study of GP practice data and fluoride levels in drinking water. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2014-204971.
Marks, L. et al. (2015). The return of public health to local government in England: changing the parameters of the public health prioritization debate? Public Health [Online] 129:1194-1203. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2015.07.028.
Sheaff, R. et al. (2015). Integration and continuity of primary care: polyclinics and alternatives - a patient-centred analysis of how organisation constrains care co-ordination. Health Services and Delivery Research Volume [Online] 3. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3310/hsdr03350.
Bramwell, D. et al. (2015). How can GPs and community health services work more effectively together? British Journal of General Practice [Online] 65:374-375. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3399/bjgp15X685909.
Miller, R. et al. (2015). What happens when GPs engage in commissioning? Two decades of experience in the English NHS. Journal of Health Services Research and Policy [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1355819615594825.
Wilson, P. et al. (2015). ReseArch with Patient and Public invOlvement: a RealisT evaluation - the RAPPORT study. Health Services and Delivery Research [Online] 3. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3310/hsdr03380.
Peckham, S. et al. (2014). Commissioning for long-term conditions: hearing the voice of and engaging users - a qualitative multiple case study. Health Services and Delivery Research [Online] 2. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3310/hsdr02440.
Petsoulas, C. et al. (2014). Views of NHS commissioners on commissioning support provision. Evidence from a qualitative study examining the early development of clinical commissioning groups in England. BMJ Open [Online] 4:1-10. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005970.
Peckham, S. and Awofeso, N. (2014). Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention. Scientific World Journal [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/293019.
Book section
Checkland, K. et al. (2016). Clinically-led Commissioning: past, present and future? in: Exworthy, M., Mannion, R. and Powell, M. eds. Dismantling the NHS? Evaluating the Impact of Health Reforms. Policy Press, pp. 149-170. Available at: https://policypress.co.uk/dismantling-the-nhs.
Coleman, A., Dhesi, S. and Peckham, S. (2016). Health and Wellbeing Boards: The new System stewards. in: Exworthy, M., Mannion, R. and Powell, M. eds. Dismantling the NHS? Evaluating the Impact of Health Reforms. Policy Press, pp. 279-300. Available at: http://policypressco.uk/dismantling-the-nhs.
Monograph
Jenkins, L. et al. (2016). Public Health and Obesity in England - The New Infrastructure Examined (Phoenix) Findings from Surveys of Directors of Public Health and Elected Members in English Local Authorities 2014 and 2015 - Second Survey Report. Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System. Available at: http://blogs.lshtm.ac.uk/prucomm/2016/07/27/public-health-and-obesity-in-england-the-new-infrastructure-examined/.
Peckham, S., Catherine, M. and Peckham, A. (2016). General practitioner recruitment and retention: An evidence synthesis. Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System. Available at: http://blogs.lshtm.ac.uk/prucomm/files/2016/11/PRUComm-General-practitioner-recruitment-and-retention-review-Final-Report.pdf.
Peckham, S. et al. (2016). Phoenix: Public Health and Obesity in England - the New Infrastructure Examined. Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System. Available at: http://blogs.lshtm.ac.uk/prucomm/files/2016/07/PHOENIX-report-final.pdf.
Peckham, S. et al. (2015). Phoenix: Public Health and Obesity in England - the New Infrastructure Examined. Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System. Available at: http://blogs.lshtm.ac.uk/prucomm/files/2016/07/Second-interim-report.pdf.
Jenkins, L. et al. (2015). Public Health and Obesity in England - The New Infrastructure Examined (Phoenix) First Survey Report: Findings from a Survey of Directors of Public Health and Elected Members. Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System. Available at: http://blogs.lshtm.ac.uk/prucomm/2016/07/15/phoenix-public-health-and-obesity-in-england-the-new-infrastructure-examined-2/.
Bramwell, D. et al. (2014). Moving Services out of hospital: Joining up General Practice and community services?. PRUComm. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/chss/docs/PRUComm-Moving-Services-out-of-Hospital-Report-V8-final.pdf.
Research report (external)
Gadsby, E. et al. (2015). PHOENIX: Public Health and Obesity in England the New Infrastructure eXamined First interim report: the scoping review. PRUComm.
Riches, N. et al. (2015). The Role Of Local Authorities In Health Issues: A Policy Document Analysis. [Online]. PRUComm. Available at: http://www.prucomm.ac.uk/.
Showing 25 of 66 total publications in KAR. [See all in KAR]
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Centre for Health Services Studies, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NF

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Last Updated: 16/11/2016