Careers and Employability Service

I want to work in Computing without a computing degree

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Introduction

This is not a problem: there are many one-year “conversion courses” designed to give graduates from any degree subject an intensive grounding in programming and other IT skills. A few of these are listed below. All kinds of first degree disciplines may be combined with these skills to give you an advantage in career areas such as finance, media, library/information work and law.
If you don't want to do a postgraduate course, there are a few employers who will train you on-the-job, although graduates in business, science, maths and engineering may be most in demand here. There are also opportunities within IT companies in non-technical roles such as sales, marketing and customer service.

Now you wear more computing power on your wrist than NASA had available for the whole Apollo project.

Are you suitable for a career in IT?

To test your suitability for a technical role in computing first try our computer programming aptitude test www.kent.ac.uk/careers/tests/computer-test.htmwhich will give you some idea of whether you might have the aptitude for a career in IT. Other tests which will check your logical and analytical thinking abilities are given below.
You could try teach yourself some Python, Java or JavaScript if you haven't done any programming: it would give you a good idea of your suitability for IT roles and make the first months of an MSc course or IT job much easier.
Python (named after Monty!) www.python.org is a modern language which is free and very easy to learn. YouTube was written in Python. You can write your first "Hello World" program in five minutes(!).
Another easy language to learn is JavaScript. A good place to start learning JavaScript is at www.w3schools.com/JS/js_intro.asp.
Java is a harder but more powerful language to learn and again, free. The easiest way to start learning Java is via the BlueJ learning environment which you can download for free www.bluej.org
Another good place for beginners is code.org, which has tutorials and exercises covering the basics, to Python, Ruby and Javascript. Codecademy is more advanced and has interactive tutorials for HTML, PHP, Python, Ruby and Javascript.
Also see www.computerscienceonline.org/cs-programs-before-college for some useful resources

Computing Careers

 

 

 

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Last Updated: 15/11/2017