Brussels School of International Studies

Flexible Study

The Brussels School of International Studies is an interdisciplinary academic community of the University of Kent bringing together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law, history, sociology and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration and the political economy and legal basis of a changing world order.

Students at BSIS are encouraged to take an interdisciplinary approach to their studies and are therefore able to combine their degree programme with a secondary specialisation if they wish. They can also take the programme in its extended version (120 ECTS) or start in January instead of September or even study part-time.

Programme Specialisations

You may choose to focus on one area, but you also have the possibility of selecting one of these subjects as a secondary area of focus. You could, for instance, read for an LLM in International Law with International Migration, or an MA in International Development with International Conflict and Security. This possibility of a combined degree reflects the interdisciplinary ethos of the School. In your in-depth study at BSIS, your area of study will likely be interdisciplinary; this programme option will allow your programme and diploma to reflect the intrinsic interdisciplinary nature of your degree and to enhance your profile. You will be able to make a choice on your secondary area of focus at the beginning of the academic year. You should submit an application for the programme that interests you most, you will then be able to choose whether you choose a secondary area of research on arrival at BSIS.

All our programmes can be tailored according to your needs:

To include a secondary area of focus, for a standard programme, you must choose three modules (four if you take the extended programme) from the pathway for your MA/LLM (see above for links) and then two modules (four if you take the extended programme) from the secondary area (click on the relevant areas below) plus one further module from the list of all modules offered at the Brussels School of International Studies. All students, irrespective of start date, standard or extended programme or full time or part time status, take the dissertation module, Fundamentals, Dissertation and Research, in their first and final semesters.

Political Strategy and Communication

 

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Extended Programme

All programmes at BSIS are offered in both the Standard (90 ECTS) and the Extended (120 ECTS) Programme format.

The Extended Programme allows students to broaden their knowledge and experience within the programme by taking more options whilst at the same time affording them a greater opportunity for internships. Students can also benefit by taking parts of the programme in Canterbury as well as in Brussels.

To be awarded a standard master degree, students must take 6 taught modules, the methodology module 'Fundamentals, Dissertation and Research' and then submit a dissertation. For the extended programme students must take an additional 3 taught modules. Details of the options are shown on the relevant programme page.

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Split-Site

If you are interested in studying in Brussels and Canterbury together, there are different ways to structure your studies.


What is Split-Site?

We offer flexibility to our programmes to ensure you can get the most out of your degree. Split-site is one aspect that means you can spend time at the Brussels School of International Studies and at the main campus in Canterbury. You might be interested in internship opportunities in Brussels, or want to experience the campus environment at Canterbury. Combining these provides a unique experience during your Master’s degree.
Split-site would involve spending the majority of your programme in Brussels and allows a term to be spent at the Canterbury campus. If you wish to start your split-site degree in Canterbury, please visit Politics or Law.


Which programmes?

The split-site option is aimed at those programmes that run at both locations. This means for the standard one year programme, you can study for an MA International Relations, MA International Conflict and Security, LLM International Law and LLM Human Rights Law.
If you are taking the extended programme, it may be possible to study all of the degrees on offer split-site. You would need to ensure that you have taken all the compulsory components of your degree in each location. For example, MA EU External Relations consists of compulsory modules in each term in Brussels. Your third term in Canterbury would be an additional term and allow you to enhance your degree with the modules on offer in Canterbury.


What is the structure?

Standard (90 ECTS) split-site (starting in Brussels)
The following programmes are available as split-site:
MA International Relations, MA International Conflict and Security, LLM Human Rights Law, LLM International Law.


Example
Term 1: Three taught modules: Brussels
Term 2: Three taught modules: Canterbury
+ Dissertation: Brussels


Extended (120 ECTS) split-site (starting in Brussels)
All MA programmes- MA EU External Relations, MA International Conflict and Security, MA International Relations, MA International Migration, MA International Development, MA International Political Economy, MA Political Strategy and Communication. LLM programmes - LLM Human Rights Law, LLM International Law.


Extended-Split-Site (starting in Brussels)
Term 1: Three taught modules: Brussels
Term 2: Three taught modules: Brussels
Term 3: Three taught modules: Canterbury
+Dissertation: Brussels

Before proceeding to the other location, students must ensure they have fulfilled all compulsory components of the degree.


What is the fee?

The split-site option is subject to its own fee and it is dependent on how you structure the programme. You’ll find details of the fee online here


How do I apply?

To apply for split site, you should apply for the programme you are interested in and at the location where you would like to start. In your application, you need to state clearly that you are applying for split-site. To confirm status on the split-Site programme, there is a form to complete during your first term of your studies to be completed and signed by the programme director.
If you are applying for the UK Postgraduate Loans, you would need to ensure you spend a minimum of 50% of your degree programme in the UK. Therefore, you would need to start in Canterbury and return to Canterbury for the dissertation.

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January Start

To accommodate those students for whom starting their studies in September is not possible, the University offers students the opportunity of starting in January. For some starting in January might coincide with the end of a work contract whilst for others, who wish to take a few months away from their studies between the completion of the undergraduate degree and the commencement of graduate studies, a January start is a practical alternative. Part-time students may also find it convenient to begin in January.

Applicants considering a January start should note, however, that both the rhythm of the academic year, as well as the overall duration of the programme, is different. For instance, students who begin in January have more opportunity to undertake an internship over the summer recess without pressure of other programme commitments. For January starters the programme extends to 18 months for full-time students in order to accommodate the examination cycle and to 27 months for those wishing to study part-time.

Full-time January students start by taking 3 modules in the January term before working, planning their dissertation or undertaking an internship during the May term and the summer recess. They then return in September to complete the remaining 3 modules before writing and then submitting their Dissertation in March. For part-time January students and those on the Extended Programme the framework is the same although spread out over two or three years.

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Standard Programme

As a full-time student starting in September, your programme will last a full 12 months. You will be expected to take 3 taught modules in the September Term together with the methodology module Fundamentals Dissertation and Research (FDR). Then in January you will take a further three modules and the second part of the FDR module. In the May term you can attend workshops and conferences as well as consult your dissertation supervisor and in the Summer months you will prepare your dissertation.

Extended Programme

As a full-time student starting in September, your programme will last 18 months. You will be expected to take 3 taught modules in the September Term together with the methodology module Fundamentals Dissertation and Research (FDR). In January you will take a further three modules before using the May term and summer recess to work on your dissertation or undertake an internship. You will return to your studies in September to take your remaining 3 modules and complete the second part of the methodology module, before writing and then submitting your dissertation in March. As well as having the considerable flexibility offered by being able to take 9 taught modules, students on this programme can also vary their study between Canterbury and Brussels but need to discuss this with admissions staff to ensure that they meet visa conditions.

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Standard Programme

Part-time students, on the standard programme, complete the normal curriculum over a period of 24 months with the dissertation being submitted in the second year. As a part-time student you are expected to take either 2, 3 or 4 modules in your first year and the remainder in your second year ensuring that you have taken 3 modules in the September term and three modules in the January term. Thus if you take 2 modules in the September term of Year 1, you would then take one module in the September term of Year 2.

You are required to take the methodology module (FDR) at some time during your studies. As Part 1 of FDR focuses upon writing papers, it is suggested that part-time students take this during their first term. Part 2, which deals with the dissertation, can either be taken in Year 1 or Year 2.

Part-time study is only available for EU/EEA passport holders, and for those who have the right to remain in Belgium for the duration of their degree.

Extended Programme

Part-time students, on the extended programme, complete the curriculum over a full three years which affords them considerable subject choice as well as a giving them greater internship opportunities. You will be expected to take either 2, 3 or 4 modules in your first year and then take the remainder of the modules in Years 2 and 3 ensuring that you take a minimum of one module and a maximum of 2 modules per term, that you have taken either 4 or 5 modules in the January and in the September terms, and that you have taken a total of 9 modules. Students on this programme can also vary their study between Canterbury and Brussels but would need to discuss this with admissions staff to ensure that they meet visa conditions.

You are required to take the methodology module (FDR) at some time during your studies. As Part 1 of FDR focuses upon writing papers, it is suggested that part-time students take this during their first term. Part 2, which deals with the dissertation, can either be at any time during your studies.

Part-time study is only available for EU/EEA passport holders, and for those who have the right to remain in Belgium for the duration of their degree.

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BSIS, University of Kent, Espace Rolin, Boulevard Louis Schmidt 2a, 1040 Brussels, Belgium

General Enquiries: +32 (2) 641 1721

Last Updated: 27/09/2017