Kent and Brexit

Travel advice for staff and students

Travelling within the EU on or after 31 October 2019

Although much remains uncertain, it is currently anticipated that the UK will leave the European Union on either 31 October 2019, without a deal with the EU, or possibly earlier if an agreement can be found.

If the UK does leave without a deal with the EU, as a UK or EU/EEA national, there could be changes to your rights if you travel from and to the UK, and you may also experience some local travel disruption. It will be important to plan ahead before you travel.

The University’s Brexit Working Group has put together the following guidance on how to prepare for this:

For staff

I am going to be abroad on or after 31 October 2019. Where can I find the latest travel advice?

The UK Government Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) has a dedicated website with up-to-date travel advice after Brexit.

You can get latest updates from the FCO Travel Advice Twitter feed (@FCOTravel) and via the hashtag #PrepareforEUExit.

The University’s Estates team has information on travel disruption around campus. Many travel providers also have specific Brexit advice relevant to their services on their website, including Eurotunnel and National Express.

There is more information on the potential impact of Brexit on students and staff on the Brexit pages of our website.

I’m not a UK national. What will happen to my right to remain in the UK after Brexit?

There will be no change to the rights and status of EU/EEA citizens currently living in the UK until 31 December 2020 and your passport or ID will continue to evidence your rights. This means that if you travel outside of the UK for work, you should be able to return as normal.

The post-Brexit immigration system is still unknown, but in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal, EU/EEA citizens will either need to apply for European Temporary Leave to Remain to stay longer than three months, or, if already resident in the UK, apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by the end of 2020. If we leave the EU with a deal, EU/EEA citizens arriving in the UK before the end of 2020 will also be eligible to apply to the Settlement Scheme.

For those coming to the UK from outside the EU, you will still be able to travel under the current immigration rules.

What documentation will I need to travel to and from the UK?

Necessary documentation will stay the same, but there may be new rules on what is valid when you travel. If your passport was issued more than nine years ago, you will need to check if it is still valid for your trip. Passports should have at least six months remaining from your date of travel. Use the Government's online tool to check if your passport is still valid.

If you are a non-UK EU/EEA national then there should be no change to your existing rights.

I have been unavoidably delayed by travel disruption on my way to campus. Who should I contact?

If you are unavoidably delayed through transport delays or disruption and are likely to miss teaching, assessment or examination, contact your line manager or school administration office at the earliest opportunity.

Where can I find up-to-date info on local travel disruption?

We are in touch with Kent Highways and are getting updates as they are available. Should there be any transport issues affecting the Campus Shuttle or our regional roads or railways, our Estates transport team will be providing updates on their website and on their social media channels.

Will there also be an impact on travel services in Europe?

Leaving the EU without a deal could affect travel to and from the UK in a number of ways. It will be important to plan ahead to ensure you have everything you need before you travel. Check directly with travel companies for latest information on their services.

I have arranged to travel by air or rail within Europe on or after 31 October 2019. Will I still be able to do this?

Yes, although services may not run as normal. In the event of 'no deal', the government anticipates reaching individual agreements with airlines and rail companies to ensure their services continue. However, there could be short-term disruption to some flights and rail journeys. Check with your provider when you book and be prepared for alternate arrangements if necessary.

I am planning on driving abroad after Brexit. Will I still be able to do this?

Yes. However, if you intend to drive a UK-registered car in the EU after Brexit, you may need a green card from your insurer. If you hold a UK driver’s licence, you may also need an International Driving Permit, which will incur a small cost. Make sure you check in good time to ensure you have all the documentation you need.

Will I still be able to use my phone and bank card in Europe after Brexit?

Yes, although it may cost more than it used to. If you have a UK mobile phone, using it within the EU may become more expensive. This will be particularly true for services that use a lot of data, such as streaming videos. Check with your mobile operator to see if they provide free data roaming.

If you have a UK bank account, using your card in the EU may become more expensive. This is also true if your bank is based in the EU and you want to use your card in the UK. Check with your bank before you travel.

Will I still be able to access healthcare in the EU?

Yes, although UK nationals may need to take out additional insurance as, in the event of ‘no deal’, the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) will no longer be valid.

If you are travelling within the EU on a University-approved trip relating to your job, the University’s business travel insurance covers emergency medical expenses and will remain valid regardless of Brexit.

If you doing a longer official work placement, you may also need to buy local health insurance from a provider specified by your host employer. If this is the case, you will be contacted directly with more information.

For non-University travel or to access wider medical services, you will need to buy travel insurance to cover health care as you would if visiting a non-EU country.

Where can I find more information about Brexit?

The University’s Brexit webpages have further information on the wide-ranging impact of leaving the European Union, including our response to it. If you have any further questions about what this could mean for you, please contact staffEUqueries@kent.ac.uk

We are still the UK’s European university. Europe is part of our DNA and we are determined to remain outward looking. Our education and research reflects the expertise and knowledge of our European experts, and we embrace our collaborations with our European partners. That will not change.

For students

I am going to be abroad on or after 31 October 2019. Where can I find the latest travel advice?

The UK Government Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) has a dedicated website with up-to-date travel advice after Brexit.

You can get latest updates from the FCO Travel Advice Twitter feed (@FCOTravel) and via the hashtag #PrepareforEUExit

The University’s Estates team has information on travel disruption around campus. Many travel providers also have specific Brexit advice relevant to their services on their website, including Eurotunnel and National Express.

There is more information on the potential impact of Brexit on students and staff on the Brexit pages of our website.

I’m not a UK national. What will happen to my right to remain in the UK after Brexit?

There will be no change to the rights and status of EU/EEA citizens currently living in the UK until 31 December 2020. This means that if you travel outside of the UK during your studies, you should be able to return as normal.

Students who are non-EU/EEA nationals but are a dependant of an EU/EEA national should ensure that they hold a valid family permit.

For those coming to the UK from outside the EU, you will still be able to travel provided your Tier 4 visa is valid.

What documentation will I need to travel to and from the UK?

Necessary documentation will stay the same, but there may be new rules on what is valid when you travel. If your passport was issued more than nine years ago, you will need to check if it is still valid for your trip. Passports should have at least six months remaining from your date of travel. Use the Government's online tool to check if your passport is still valid.

If you are a non-UK EU/EEA national then, alongside your passport, make sure you also carry your University of Kent student card as proof of right to study. You will also need a ‘Proof of Student Status’ letter from the Registry. New requests take up to two days to process.

What should I do if my right to remain is challenged at the UK border?

If you experience difficulties at the border, border staff will be able to contact the University at any time of day or night to verify your attendance as student. These pages will be updated shortly with up-to-date information on how to seek assistance. The Student Immigration Compliance Team can also provide support should you need it.

I am likely to miss teaching, assessment or an exam due to unavoidable travel delays. Who should I contact?

If you are unavoidably delayed through transport delays or disruption and are likely to miss teaching, assessment or examination, contact your school administration office or email studentEUqueries@kent.ac.uk at the earliest opportunity. The University has effective processes to review your situation and provide mitigation where appropriate.

Where can I find up-to-date info on local travel disruption?

We are in touch with Kent Highways and are getting updates as they are available. Should there be any transport issues affecting the Campus Shuttle or our regional roads or railways, our Estates transport team will be providing updates on their website and on their social media channels.

Will there also be an impact on travel services in Europe?

Leaving the EU without a deal could affect travel to and from the UK in a number of ways. It will be important to plan ahead to ensure you have everything you need before you travel. Check directly with travel companies for latest information on their services.

I have arranged to travel by air or rail within Europe on or after 31 October 2019. Will I still be able to do this?

Yes, although services may not run as normal. In the event of 'no deal', the government anticipates reaching individual agreements with airlines and rail companies to ensure their services continue. However, there could be short-term disruption to some flights and rail journeys. Check with your provider when you book, and be prepared for alternate arrangements if necessary.

I am planning on driving abroad after Brexit. Will I still be able to do this?

Yes. However, if you intend to drive a UK-registered car in the EU after Brexit, you may need a green card from your insurer. If you hold a UK driver’s licence, you may also need an International Driving Permit, which will incur a small cost. Make sure you check in good time to ensure you have all the documentation you need.

Will I still be able to use my phone and bank card in Europe after Brexit?

Yes, although it may cost more than it used to. If you have a UK mobile phone, using it within the EU may become more expensive. This will be particularly true for services that use a lot of data, such as streaming videos. Check with your mobile operator to see if they provide free data roaming.

If you have a UK bank account, using your card in the EU may become more expensive. This is also true if your bank is based in the EU and you want to use your card in the UK. Check with your bank before you travel.

Will I still be able to access healthcare in the EU?

Yes, although UK nationals may need to take out additional insurance as, in the event of ‘no deal’, the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) will no longer be valid.

If you are travelling within the EU on a University-approved trip relating to your course, you will need to register for the University’s student travel insurance – this covers emergency medical expenses and will remain valid regardless of Brexit.

If you doing a longer official study placement, you may also need to buy local health insurance from a provider specified by your host university. If this is the case, you will be contacted directly with more information.

For non-University travel or to access wider medical services, you will need to buy travel insurance to cover health care as you would if visiting a non-EU country.

Where can I find more information about Brexit?

The University’s Brexit webpages have further information on the potential impact of leaving the European Union, including our response to it. If you have any further questions about what this could mean for you, please contact studentEUqueries@kent.ac.uk

We are still the UK’s European university. Europe is part of our DNA and we are determined to remain outward looking. Our education and research reflects the expertise and knowledge of our European experts, and we embrace our collaborations with our European partners. That will not change.

The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000

Last Updated: 11/04/2019