Portrait of Dr Lisa Lin

Dr Lisa Lin

Lecturer

About

Lisa Lin is a media scholar and documentary producer who is interested in exploring the correlations between technology and creativity. Before joining Kent, she worked as a documentary producer unveiling social issues and human stories among under-represented communities in the UK, Singapore and China. Having started making documentaries after her undergraduate study, Lisa produced mathematic documentary Matter Patterns and a series of oral history projects in 2012. Her producing works include historical documentary series I Wouldn’t Go in There WW2 Special (National Geographic, 2015), music documentary G-Force (theatrically released in Asia), her first directorial documentary Last Breath (One World Media, 2017) which unveiled social injustices behind industrial air pollution and mass consumerism. In 2018, she worked as a London-based producer for Channel News Asia’s The Truth about Fake News, investigating the impact of fake news on public opinion and democracy in the post-truth era.
Lisa is currently the Principal Investigator for a GCRF-funded research project 'How to Employ Environmental Documentaries as Visual Evidence to Engage a Wider Debate on Social Injustice Behind Air Pollution in Jingjinji (China) and Delhi (India)'. In partnership with Sussex University and Beijing Normal University, the multi-disciplinary research project is funded by GCRF Partnership Fund in 2019 which is supported by UKRI as part of Kent’s QR allocation from Research England. Drawing upon media, public policy and anthropological perspectives, this project adopts a highly innovative research design to combine documentary filming, policy and political analysis, and anthropological observation into one research inquiry on the marginalised people’s daily lives in China and India.
Lisa convenes and teaches two modules in Media Audiences and Podcasting at the School of Arts. She is also an Associate Member of Kent Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Cyber Security where she researches misinformation and privacy issues on Chinese social media. Before joining Kent, Lisa worked as a Visiting Tutor at Royal Holloway where she taught undergraduate courses including MA1051 Film and TV Histories, MA2080 Creative Industries and MA3092 TV Poetics. She also gave guest lectures to postgraduate students on factual television production and global media industries across Europe and Asia.
Lisa holds a PhD in Media and Communications, an MA in International Broadcasting from Royal Holloway, University of London and a Diploma in Factual Television Production from the National Film and Television School. She is currently in the process of publishing her ethnographic study on Chinese convergence-era television as a monograph that examines the shifting production cultures and convergence strategies adopted by Chinese media institutions, and how technology shapes production cultures and creates new opportunities and spaces for innovation and creativity across different players in post-TVIII China.  

Research interests

Lisa is interested in exploring the correlations between technology and creativity and how digital technologies have transformed and disrupted the traditional logics of media production and distribution on macro-, meso-, and micro-levels. Her works examine the shifting production cultures of Internet-distributed television and how digital technologies have empowered a new era of creative freedoms among media practitioners. She has been developing research projects on the impact of misinformation and user privacy issues in the post-TVIII era. 


She is currently working on a multi-disciplinary research project with Institute of Developmental Studies (IDS) and Beijing Normal University on the social injustices behind climate change and urban air pollution in fast industrializing countries and its impacts on the marginalized communities in China and India. The multi-disciplinary research project is funded by GCRF Partnership Fund in 2019 which is supported by UKRI as part of Kent’s QR allocation from Research England. Drawing upon media, public policy and anthropological perspectives, this project adopts a highly innovative research design to combine documentary filming, policy and political analysis, and anthropological observation into one research inquiry on the marginalised people’s daily lives in China and India. 

Teaching

Lisa will be convening and teaching two modules:

MSTU4001 - Media Audiences: This module examines perceptions of media audiences and their social and economic power through the study of key theorists, themes and case studies. Students will consider the audience as an object, the audience as an institution, the audience as a user and more laterally, as a producer of media in the digital age. This module also considers fandom, public opinion and ratings, and how these once fixed concepts have been blurred in the age of Web 2.0, troubling traditional notions of audiences as passive receivers or at times even victims. Through real-world contemporary examples and students’ own experiences with media, this module seeks to make audience theory relevant and accessible to the study of personal and public media consumption.

MSTU5005 - Podcasting: This module employs both theory and practice-based learning to examine the podcasting genre and consider how podcasts are developed; what are the editorial and ethical issues at stake; and how audiences are acquired and expanded. Podcasting is a media form that is increasing its audience reach and size year on year. Unlike supposedly impartial journalists, podcast presenters are often encouraged to give personal perspective allowing these media makers to have creative and intellectual agency often omitted from traditional mediated forms.

MSTU6002 - Podcasting: This module employs both theory and practice-based learning to examine the podcasting genre and consider how podcasts are developed; what are the editorial and ethical issues at stake; and how audiences are acquired and expanded. Podcasting is a media form that is increasing its audience reach and size year on year. Unlike supposedly impartial journalists, podcast presenters are often encouraged to give personal perspective allowing these media makers to have creative and intellectual agency often omitted from traditional mediated forms. Students are given the opportunity to research contemporary practitioners, companies and the platforms for the dissemination of podcasts. In parallel to learning about the podcasting culture and its contexts, students will engage with this more personal form of production, as they design, produce and distribute a podcast that will be available for download.

Supervision

Lisa is interested in supervising BA, MA and PhD projects on the following topics: 

  • Internet television
  • digital media production 
  • international television coproduction
  • Chinese television industries
  • documentary practices
  • factual television development and production
  • media audiences

She welcomes enquiries from potential MA and PhD applicants.

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