School of Psychology

Experience Excellence Studying People


Daniel Jolley

Postgraduate Researcher

Research

Research interests

My PhD research focuses generally around the psychology of conspiracy theories, and takes a unique experimental approach to studying the social consequences specifically. The vast majority of studies on the psychological factors associated with conspiracy theories have been correlational, and very few researchers have considered the broader impact on important social issues. My research therefore asks questions such as: Are conspiracy theories harmless fun, or do they have potentially significant harmful effects? Who believes them and why? Can understanding more about these people help develop ways to alleviate the potential harmful effects?

Thesis title

Social psychological consequences of conspiracy theories

Supervisor

Dr Karen Douglas

Funding

Self-Funded

Publications

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (2014). The effects of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories on vaccination intentions. PLOS ONE.

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (2014). The social consequences of conspiracism: Exposure to conspiracy theories decreases intentions to engage in politics and to reduce one’s carbon footprint. British Journal of Psychology, 105, 35-36. doi: 10.1111/bjop.12018.

Jolley, D. (2013). The detrimental nature of conspiracy theories. PsyPAG Quarterly, 88, 35-39.

Jolley, D. (2013). New Voices: Are conspiracy theories just harmless fun. The Psychologist, 26(1), 60-62.

Conference presentations (selected)

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (Forthcoming, June 2014). Conspiracy theories and system justification beliefs. Oral presentation at European Association of Social Psychology, held at University of Amsterdam.

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (2013, September). The effects of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories on vaccination intentions. Poster presentation at BPS Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, held at Brighton Inn, Brighton.

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (2013, August). Anti-vaccine conspiracy theories influence immunisation intentions. Oral presentation at BPS Social Section Annual Conference, held at University of Exeter.

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (2013, July). Conspiracy theories and system justification. Oral presentation at the Annual Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group (PsyPAG) conference, Lancaster University.

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (2012, July). Examining the consequences of exposure to conspiracy theories. In D. Jolley (chair), “Psychology of conspiracy theories: What we want you to believe”. Oral presentation in symposium conducted at the Annual Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group (PsyPAG) Conference, held at Northumbria University, Newcastle. (Sponsored by the BPS SPS)

Jolley, D. & Douglas, K.M. (2012, July). Examining the consequences of exposure to conspiracy theories. Oral presentation at Power, Politics, and Paranoia meeting, held at Felix Meritis, Amsterdam.

Jolley, D. & Wood. M. (2012, March). The social psychology of conspiracy theories: Consequences and contradictions. Invited oral presentation at Anomalistic Psychology Interest Group (APIG), held at Goldsmiths University, London.

 

 

 

School of Psychology - Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP

Contact us

Last Updated: 25/02/2014