School of English

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Dr Harry Newman

Lecturer in Early Modern Literature

School of English

(BA and MA, Leeds; PhD, Birmingham)

Office: W4.E4 (Rutherford College)

Interests

My research interests in the early modern period include drama (especially that of Shakespeare, Middleton and Jonson), poetics, material culture, book history, paratexts, gender and sexuality studies, the history of science and medicine, epistolary culture and epigram collections. I recently completed my PhD at The Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon. My doctoral project, ‘Impressive Shakespeare’, was an investigation of the language and imagery of three ‘impressing technologies’ (sealing, coining and printing) in Shakespearean drama, and in particular how they contribute to the construction of characters’ sexual identities. It is an interdisciplinary thesis that considers not just imaginative literature by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, but also a wide range of ‘non-literary’ early modern texts such as medical writings, religious and political treatises, philosophical works, rhetorical manuals and technological discourses. I am currently working on further publications in my areas of interest, including a monograph that develops the subject of my PhD thesis, and I have plans for a book called The Paratextual Metaphor in Early Modern England.

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Publications

Book Chapter

‘“PRinter, that art the Midwife to my muse”: Thomas Freeman and the Analogy between Printing and Midwifery in Renaissance England’, in Victoria Gardner and John Hinks (eds), The Early Modern Book Trade: Perceptions and Practices (London: British Library/Oak Knoll Press, forthcoming in early 2013).

Articles

‘“A seale of Virgin waxe at hand / Without impression there doeth stand”: Hymenal Seals in English Renaissance Literature’, in James Daybell and Andrew Gordon (eds), New Directions in the Study of Early Modern Correspondence, special edition of Lives and Letters 4:1 (Autumn 2012)

‘“[T]he stamp of Martius”: The Technology of Wounds in Shakespeare’s Coriolanus’ (in progress).

‘“[M]y intentions herein are honest and iust”: Prefacing Printed Gynaecological and Obstetrical Texts in Early Modern England’ (in progress).

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During the Academic Year 2014/15 I will be teaching:

EN692 Early Modern Literature 1500-1700 (Stage 2)

EN694 Shakespeare and Early Modern Drama (Stage 2)

EN660 Writing Lives in Early Modern England: Diaries, Letters and Secret Selves (Stage 3)

I am also the convenor for EN694 and EN660.

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School of English, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NX

The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 823054

Last Updated: 29/08/2014