School of Arts

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Dr Aki Pasoulas

Lecturer

Music and Audio Arts

Aki Pasoulas is an electroacoustic composer, interested particularly in acousmatic music, sonic art, sound perception and spatial sound.

Aki Pasoulas is an electroacoustic composer, whose works are continually performed worldwide. He holds a PhD on timescale perception in electroacoustic music, and between 2004 and 2012 he taught at universities in London including City, Middlesex, and the University of the Arts. His doctoral research, supervised by Denis Smalley at City University London and funded by the AHRC, investigated the listener's experience and interpretation of time passing and the interrelationships among timescales in electroacoustic music. He is a board member of the UK and Ireland Soundscape Community (UKISC).

He originally studied and worked as a graphic designer, before embarking on music studies at the Open University and then at Goldsmiths College, University of London, from where he graduated with first class honours. His BMus concentrated on contemporary art music, composition and ethnomusicology. He subsequently gained a distinction for his master's degree at Goldsmiths, specialising in electroacoustics. Aki organised and performed with many ensembles and wrote pieces for various combinations of instruments, found objects, voice, recorded and electronic sound.

Aki was a SPNM shortlisted composer for 2008-11. His compositions received honorable mentions and were shortlisted at international composition competitions such as Métamorphoses 2008 in Belgium, and Concours Internationaux 2009 (Musiques Electroacoustiques et Arts Electroniques) in France. His works have been selected and presented at key peer-reviewed events across the globe, and his music is housed in the Phonothèque and Mnémothèque of the Institut International de Musique Electroacoustique de Bourges (IMEB) in the National Library of France.

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‘Stimulus Complexity and Time Judgments’ in International Computer Music Conference Proceedings (ICMC 2011), August 2011.

‘Temporal Associations, Semantic Content, and Source Bonding’ in Organised Sound, Vol. 16 (1), pp. 63-8, 2011.

‘Paramnesia’ in ICMC 2010 (CD compilation of computer music published by the International Computer Music Association). ICMA, CD IC120, 2010.

Three compositions and several sound gestures in Sound Design Tools (published by KPM Music Ltd). CD KPM752, 2010.

‘An Overview of Score and Performance in Electroacoustic Music’ in eContact!, Vol. 10 (4) (online, published by the Canadian Electroacoustic Community), 2008; includes 10 min recorded improvisation of the electronic ensemble City Composers’ Collective.

‘Architectural Soundmarks: Greek Orthodox Cathedral’ in Earshot (the Journal of the UK and Ireland Soundscape Community), No 4 (Time and Visibility II), ed. Rahma Khazam, p. 83; and CD track 7 (soundscape recording), 2003.
- ‘Stockhausen and Formel Komposition’ in NoiseGate magazine, issue 9, pp. 50-56, 2001.

Peer-Reviewed Performances:

‘Paramnesia’ (2009, acousmatic work). Selected and performed at: EMUFest International Electroacoustic Music Festival in Rome, 2011; WFAE International Conference on Acoustic Ecology in Corfu, Greece, 2011; Festival Futura of acousmatic art in Crest, France, 2011; International Computer Music Conference (ICMC) in New York, 2010; Sonic Artists in Wales (SAW) electroacoustic symposium in Cardiff, 2010.

‘Arborescences’ (2008, acousmatic work). Ran continuously as an installation for ten days at the ISCM World New Music Days festival, Sydney, Australia, 2010; ran continuously in an interactive kiosk for three months at the ‘International Exhibition: Summer 2011’ at the BYTE Gallery in Lexington USA, 2011. Also selected and performed at: Musicacoustica International Festival of Electroacoustic Music in Beijing, China, 2012; Sonic Rain concert series in Oregon, 2011; International Computer Music Conference (ICMC) in Montreal, Canada, 2009; 6th Sound and Music Computing conference (SMC) in Porto, Portugal, 2009; Sonoimágenes international acousmatic and multimedia festival in Buenos Aires, 2009.

‘Chronos’ (2006, electroacoustic stereo sound and miked clock, for 3 channels; second version for stereo sound only). Selected and performed at ÉuCuE xxvii, La primauté de l'oreille / Primacy of the ear, Concordia University, Montréal, Canada, 2008. Aki Pasoulas was selected for the Composer Shortlist (2008-11) by the SPNM organisation, for the acousmatic version of ‘Chronos’.

‘Vessel@Anchor ST6’ (2006, acousmatic work). Festival Synthèse, France (two performances in 2006 and 2007; selected by the audience for the subsequent performance in 2007).

In addition, Aki Pasoulas reworked new versions of ‘Paraboles Mixe’ and ‘Scambi’ originally composed by Henri Pousseur in 1972 and 1957 respectively. The new versions were commissioned in 2011 by Middlesex University for the ‘DREAM’ project (Digital Re-working of ElectroAcoustic Music), and were premiered at Middlesex in 2011.

Non-peer reviewed performances and invitations include California (at the Centre for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics), Wisconsin, Carrboro, New York City, San Diego, Nacodgoches, Mercer Island, Illinois, Cambridge (USA), Montreal, São Paolo, Corfu, Rethymnon, Thessaloniki (Greece), London, Leicester, Stockholm (at Fylkingen), Gävle (at IDKA, Sweden), and Vienna.

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Aki Pasoulas teaches sonic art and various topics related to music technology and composition. His expertise lies in electroacoustic music, spatial sound, psychoacoustics, and acoustic communication.

In the past, he designed and developed modules related to studio-based composition, sonic art and creative practice, and supervised a large number of innovative works at both undergraduate and postgraduate level related to electroacoustic composition, sound design and music for animations, live improvisation, public intervention, unconventional scores, field recordings, sound poetry, and multichannel and interactive sound installations. He has continuously been working with students to find appropriate routes to present their works in public, with venues ranging from conventional art galleries to elevators, squash courts, and the London Underground.

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Aki’s research interests include electroacoustic music, particularly acousmatic music; time and timescale perception; psychoacoustics and sound perception; spatial sound; and field recording and soundscape ecology, especially in relation to listening psychology.

Aki has an international presence as a composer, and he co-ordinated and organised conferences, workshops, sound installation events and electroacoustic music concerts. He was a shortlisted composer for the Society for the Promotion of New Music (SPNM), from 2008 to 2011. During that period, his acousmatic works were promoted by the organisation and played at many venues worldwide. In 2009, his electroacoustic work ‘Arborescences’ was one of only three compositions selected to represent Great Britain at the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM) World New Music Days international festival in Sydney, Australia; it ran continuously as an installation at the Conservatorium of Music, for the duration of the festival for ten consecutive days.

Aki gained his PhD (outright pass) from City University in London, supervised by Denis Smalley and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). His doctoral research comprises a large thesis and a number of acousmatic works with alternative versions, all of which are continually performed across the world. His study revealed and reinforced the importance of psychological time in perception and interpretation of structures in music, developed the innovative idea of using parallel temporal forms in composition, and analysed extrinsic and intrinsic factors that affect our perception of time and thus our interpretation of a musical work.

His research on timescales and psychological time, which is directly related to musicology of electroacoustic music and creative practice, is also useful for interactive music encouraging further development and interdisciplinary research among the areas of music perception, time perception and electroacoustic performance practice.

Aki reviewed music works and papers on aesthetics for the International Computer Music Conferences (ICMC), and papers related to acoustic ecology and soundscape composition for the ‘Organised Sound’ journal. He is currently a board member of the UK and Ireland Soundscape Community (UKISC; affiliated to the World Forum for Acoustic Ecology), and a member of Electronic Music Foundation (EMF), International Computer Music Association (ICMA), Live Argorithms for Music (LAM) research network, PRS for Music, and Hellenic Electroacoustic Music Composers Association (HELMCA).

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Aki is interested in supervising research students wishing to explore any areas of electroacoustic music and sonic art. He is particularly interested in acousmatic composition, time perception and music, sound and space, soundscape and listening.

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Last Updated: 26/06/2013